ANNEX 1

 

 


 


Contents

What is the Local Plan.. 9

Strategic Proposals. 24

1       Economic Strategy. 24

2 - Town Centre Strategy. 34

3 - Housing Strategy. 52

4 - Environment Strategy. 68

5 - Community Strategy. 92

6 - Transport Strategy. 94

 

Development Management Policies. 100

7 - Economy. 100

8 - Town and District Centres. 103

9 - Tourism... 106

10 - The Rural Economy. 112

11 - Housing.. 116

12 - Green Infrastructure. 136

13 - Quality Development. 146

14 - Heritage. 152

16 - Safe and Healthy Environment. 172

17 - Communities. 187

18 - Transport. 191

 

APPENDIX A:  ECONOMY.. 205

APPENDIX B: HOUSING.. 219

APPENDIX C: ENVIRONMENT AND QUALITY OF LIFE.. 242

APPENDIX D: TYPES OF DEVELOPMENT THAT WOULD TRIGGER THE NEED FOR AN AIR QUALITY ASSESSMENT.. 250

APPENDIX E: TRANSPORT AND INFRASTRUCTURE.. 252

 



 

List of Maps

Map 1 - Map of Thanet 11

Map 2 - Rank of Lower Super Output Areas. 13

Map 3 - Key Issues and Opportunities. 14

Map 4 - Settlement Hierarchy. 19

Map 5 - Key Diagram... 20

Map 6 - Manston Business Park. 30

Map 7 - Westwood Policy Map. 38

Map 8 - Margate Policy Map. 42

Map 9 - Ramsgate Policy Map. 47

Map 10 - Broadstairs Policy Map. 50

Map 11 - Settlement Hierarchy. 54

Map 12 - Green Wedges. 69

Map 13 - Thanet's Existing Green Infrastructure. 76

Map 14 - Thanet's Transport Infrastructure. 95

Map 15 - New Rail Station. 99

Map 16 - Cliftonville West and Margate Central 123

Map 17 - Thanet's Heat Density. 167

Map 18 - Solar Parks. 169

Map 19 - Thanet's Groundwater Protection Zones. 175

Map 20 - Aircraft Noise Contour Map. 181

Map 21 - New Primary School, Margate. 189

Map 22 - Expansion of Margate Cemetery. 190

Map 23 - The High Speed One Network. 194

Map 24 - Vere Road, Broadstairs. 196

Map 25 - Palm Bay, Cliftonville. 196

Map 26- Barnes Avenue Car Park, Westbrook. 197

Map 27 - Car Parking in Margate Town Centre. 199

Map 28 - Car Parking in Ramsgate Town Centre. 200

Map 29 - Car Parking in Broadstairs Town Centre. 200

Map 30 - Car Parking at Westwood. 203

 


 


List of Tables

Table 1 - Thanet's Retail Need. 35

Table 2 - Total Housing Provision. 54

Table 3 - Area Specific Objectives. 55

Table 4 - Market Homes. 65

Table 5 - Affordable Homes. 65

Table 6 - Sites Allocated for Residential Development at Rural Settlements. 124

Table 7 - Requirements for New Open Space. 138

Table 8 - Code for Sustainable Homes. 164

Table 9 - Noise Hierarchy. 179

Table 10 - Environmental Zones. 184

Table 11- Obtrusive Light Limitations for Exterior Lighting Installations – General Observers. 184



 

What is the Local Plan

The Local Plan is a key Council document that is required to guide and deliver the Council’s plans and aspirations for growth. It is essential to shaping change in a form which is desired by the Council and Thanet’s communities, and for the delivery of development projects and infrastructure.

The Plan must be prepared with the objective of contributing to the achievement of sustainable development, and be in accordance with national planning policy.

The Plan should be aspirational but also realistic and should provide sufficient flexibility to adapt to rapid change. The Plan must be based upon up to date, sound evidence. We have to be able to demonstrate that the Plan will be deliverable and therefore the proposals included within it must be viable and realistic. The Plan will be delivered by a number of partners, including the private sector.

The Plan sets out policies and proposals that will be used to guide decisions and investment on development and regeneration over the period to 2031. It sets out how and where the homes, jobs, community facilities, shops and infrastructure will be delivered and the type of places and environments we want to create. It also identifies land to be protected from development, such as open space. Once adopted, the Plan will form the statutory planning framework for determining planning applications and will replace the ‘saved’ policies from the Thanet Local Plan 2006.

Why is the Council producing a Local Plan?

·       The Council is required by government to produce a Local Plan.

·       The Council also wants to set out in advance how it wishes to see the district develop. This provides certainty to developers, businesses, the community and other stakeholders.

·       The Plan provides a framework to help deliver the Council’s Economic Development and Regeneration Strategy

·       The Plan will ensure that decisions on planning applications are made in accordance with local policy. Without a Plan the Council has less control over development in the area.

How has the Council decided what the Plan should contain?

·       The National Planning Policy Framework sets out what the government expects local plans to cover.

·       We have considered the specific issues and opportunities that are relevant to Thanet.

·       We carried out consultation on the Issues and Options for the Plan and have considered the comments received.

·       We have assessed the merits of the options in achieving sustainable development, including through the Sustainability Appraisal.

·       We have and will continue to co-operate with our neighbouring authorities on cross boundary strategic issues.

The options and assessment of their merits are documented in the Issues and Options Consultation Document, the Sustainability Appraisal and in topic papers, which can be accessed on the Planning Policy pages of the Council's website. This Draft Local Plan is based upon the Council’s preferred options.

How is the Plan structured?

The Plan is set out in three main sections.

Section 1 provides the introduction and sets the context for the Plan. It sets out the vision for Thanet that the Plan is seeking to achieve, and introduces the overall strategy behind the Plan, as well as setting out the strategic priorities and objectives which need to be achieved in order to deliver the vision and strategy of the Plan.

Section 2 sets out the strategic issues and policies of the Plan. These are the overarching policies which underpin the Plan's strategy. This section sets out the overarching strategies for delivering sustainable development and the overall levels of development and growth which are needed in Thanet, and includes the strategies for the economy, town centres, housing, environment, communities and transport, including strategic site proposals.

Section 3 sets out district wide development management policies. These are detailed and wide ranging policies which may be relevant to all new development proposals in Thanet. The section is set out in topic areas, and covers issues including climate change, design and heritage.

 

Disclaimer: All maps in this publication are produced under the following OS copyright:  © Crown copyright and database rights 2014 Ordnance Survey 100018261

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanet's Profile and Key Issues

In order to inform the Plan for the future, we must have a good understanding of the characteristics of Thanet today, and the issues and opportunities that it presents. These are set out in the evidence and background papers supporting this document.

The following profile of Thanet provides an overview of the key characteristics, problems, issues and opportunities that need to be addressed.

Thanet lies at the eastern end of Kent, in close proximity to continental Europe. It has three main coastal towns of Margate, Ramsgate and Broadstairs. The built up area is densely populated and forms an almost continuous urban belt around the north east coast. This is separated by areas of countryside between the towns and providing relief in the built area. There are also attractive coastal and rural villages.

Map 1 - Map of Thanet

© Crown copyright and database rights 2014 Ordnance Survey 100018261
 
 Description: Thanet in East Kent 1

The district has an area of 103 square kilometres and a resident population of 134,400[1]. About 30% of the district is urban with 95% of the population living in the main urban area around the coast. Thanet is the fourth most populated district in Kent, with the second highest population density. Thanet is a popular area for retired people to live, and has the highest number of over 65 year olds in the county whilst having a lower proportion (59.6%) of 16-64 year olds than the county (62.6%).

Thanet is a unique and vibrant coastal area, with an attractive environment and a number of unique features. There are 32 kilometres of coastline with attractive chalk cliffs and beautiful sandy beaches and bays, many of which have been awarded European Blue Flag status. Much of the coast is also recognised for its internationally important habitats, including coastal chalk and significant populations of coastal birds. This is reflected in the coast’s designation under international and national legislation, including Sites of Special Scientific Interest, Special Protection Areas, and Specials Areas of Conservation. These areas are protected by legislation to prevent harm to them from development change and other activity.

Thanet is also rich in history, with around 2,000 listed buildings and 21 Conservation Areas. Its historic landscape contains many archaeological sites dating back to pre-historic times.

Outside of the urban area, much of the land is high quality and intensively farmed agricultural land.

Thanet has some areas which are at risk from flooding. These are confined to the low lying areas of the countryside to the south west of the district, and along the very edges of the coast, affecting small areas of Margate and Ramsgate.

In 2005, a new town centre was established at Westwood. This brought many retailers not previously represented in Thanet, and in turn has significantly reduced the ‘leakage’ of retail spend from the district. The centre continues to attract investment, with further development planned over the next few years. The area does however suffer from traffic congestion, and accessibility around the centre, particularly on foot, is not convenient.

The district benefits from excellent road access to and from the M25 and London via the M2 and dual carriageway A299. Access to Dover and beyond is via the A256, with the recently completed East Kent Access Road providing dual carriageway for the majority of the route. Access to the nearby cathedral city of Canterbury and to Ashford is via the single carriageway A28. Thanet has rail links to London, Canterbury, Dover and Ashford. Since 2009 High Speed domestic rail services operate from Thanet to London St Pancras using the High Speed 1 route via Ashford.

Ramsgate is a major cross channel port with opportunities for passenger and freight services to Belgium. It has also recently established itself as a base for servicing offshore wind farms. Thanet has an international airport whose recent activity has been predominantly in the freight market, but with some passenger services. The recent announcement regarding the closure of the airport makes its future role for the district uncertain.

The tourism sector has continued to grow over the last couple of years, compared with declines in the South East and England. However, Thanet has a generally weak economic and employment base, and is underperforming when compared to the region. Productivity is below the county average and Thanet experienced a steeper decline in total employment in 2011 than the South East and England. Thanet’s Business Parks have been slow to develop, and there is a significant amount of undeveloped employment land.

The towns’ high streets have continued to suffer, particularly Margate, with vacancy rates significantly above the national average. However, alongside the opening of the Turner Contemporary Gallery in April 2011, Margate’s Old Town and lower High Street have seen a significant number of new businesses opening.

Map 2 - Rank of Lower Super Output Areas

Description: Indices of Multiple Deprivation 2010

The district is ranked as the 49th most deprived district out of 326 authorities in England with the highest average proportion of households in poverty within Kent (Index of Multiple Deprivation 2010). Average skills levels of Thanet’s residents are lower than the rest of Kent and England, with unemployment levels (claimant count 2012) at 6.2%, twice that of Kent. Wage levels are also lower than the national and regional average.

The overall quality of life of Thanet’s residents is extremely varied. Some residents enjoy a very high quality of life, including living in high quality residential environments. However, Thanet also has a number of highly deprived wards with many people with support needs. These areas are also characterised by pockets of urban decline and poor housing stock. A key challenge is to ensure that everyone has the same opportunities by reducing inequalities in the area and improving quality of life for all.

In relation to Thanet’s specific places and towns the following map summarises the key issues and opportunities that need to be addressed.

 

 


Map 3 - Key Issues and Opportunities

© Crown copyright and database rights 2014 Ordnance Survey 100018261
 
 Description: place based issues


The Vision

Thanet has realised its growth potential as a location for business investment.

Making the most of its close proximity to Europe and easy access to London, Thanet plays an important role in East Kent.

It has benefited from investment in skills, employment, and infrastructure. Health and educational attainment in Thanet are comparable with the county average. Thanet successfully retains and attracts skilled people to live and work in the area.

A strong higher and further education sector has developed and evolved, providing links with local businesses. Opportunities in the green economy have been realised.

Thanet has a sustainable, balanced economy with a strong focus on tourism, culture and leisure, supported by the three thriving coastal towns.

It has a well established year round visitor economy, a destination of choice, having high quality accommodation and public spaces, and capitalising on its natural assets, the coastline and beaches, the heritage and culture.

The coastal town centres have re-defined their roles, maximising their unique characteristics, with diverse commercial offers and independent places to shop, eat and stay. New and restored housing has been regenerated next to boutique hotels and art studios.

Margate is a contemporary seaside resort based on its unique assets of a sandy beach, harbour and rich townscape. The creative industry, niche retail and educational sectors have diversified the economic heart of the town.

Ramsgate's maritime heritage, the commercial function of the port, supporting renewable technology, its Royal Harbour, marina, beach and attractive waterfront, provide a vibrant mix of town centre uses, with a strong visitor economy and café culture.

Broadstairs is a charming and attractive town and a popular location for visitors and residents, who enjoy the flavour of its historic associations, range of small shops and restaurants, beach and picturesque waterfront.

Westwood has strengthened its position as a retail destination, as well as being firmly established as a town centre, and has developed as an integrated community, with housing, business, leisure, sport and recreation, and education. This has been supported by investment in transport infrastructure creating a safe and attractive pedestrian environment at its centre.

High quality new homes, as well as the regeneration of Thanet’s high quality historic housing, provide a choice of homes for Thanet’s residents and for those who have invested and relocated to the area.

Cliftonville has an economically independent, settled and mixed community structure, with the pride and confidence to invest in quality development and care for its local environment.

The villages retain their separate physical identity, historic character and have vibrant communities with local facilities and services.

The open countryside between the towns and villages remains essentially undeveloped, with a varied landscape, tranquility and distinctive views. Opportunity has been taken to increase public access and there is a diverse agricultural economic base, including green tourism.

 

 

 

 


 

The Local Plan's Strategy

The following sections set out the key drivers for this Local Plan strategy, explains the overarching principles of the strategy and context of national planning policy, and the need to deliver sustainable development.

Sustainable Development

The Local Plan is prepared by Thanet District Council under the national planning policy system, whose central principle is to achieve ‘sustainable development’. This may be defined as ‘development that meets the need of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs’.

The National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) sets out the Government’s view of what sustainable development in England means in practice for the planning system.

The NPPF identifies the three dimensions of sustainable development; economic, social and environmental; giving rise to the need for the planning system to perform a number of roles:

‘an economic role – contributing to building a strong, responsive and competitive economy, by ensuring that sufficient land of the right type is available in the right places and at the right time to support growth and innovation; and by identifying and coordinating development requirements, including the provision of infrastructure;

a social role – supporting strong, vibrant and healthy communities, by providing the supply of housing required to meet the needs of present and future generations; and by creating a high quality built environment, with accessible local services that reflect the community’s needs and support its health, social and cultural well-being; and

an environmental role – contributing to protecting and enhancing our natural, built and historic environment; and, as part of this, helping to improve biodiversity, use natural resources prudently, minimise waste and pollution, and mitigate and adapt to climate change including moving to a low carbon economy.’

In pursuing sustainable development, this Plan positively seeks opportunities to meet the needs of the area, and economic, social and environmental gains are sought jointly and simultaneously.

The following policy sets out how the Council will consider proposals for development in accordance with the National Planning Policy Framework. The Plan as a whole sets out what sustainable development means for Thanet.

Policy SP01 - National Planning Policy Framework – Presumption in favour of sustainable development

When considering development proposals the Council will take a positive approach that reflects the presumption in favour of sustainable development contained in the National Planning Policy Framework. It will always work proactively with applicants jointly to find solutions which mean that proposals can be approved wherever possible, and to secure development that improves the economic, social and environmental conditions in the area.

Planning applications that accord with the policies in this Local Plan (and, where relevant, with polices in neighbourhood plans) will be approved without delay, unless material considerations indicate otherwise.

Where there are no policies relevant to the application or relevant policies are out of date at the time of making the decision then the Council will grant permission unless material considerations indicate otherwise – taking into account whether:

·       Any adverse impacts of granting permission would significantly and demonstrably outweigh the benefits, when assessed against the policies in the National Planning Policy Framework taken as a whole; or

·       Specific policies in that Framework indicate that development should be restricted.

A bold and positive strategy is needed in order to achieve the Council’s vision for Thanet. Realising the economic aspirations for the district and improving the quality of life for all Thanet’s residents will require investment in new job creation, new quality homes, open space and infrastructure, as well as maintaining and enhancing Thanet's existing high quality built and natural environment.

Although Thanet has historically experienced social and economic problems, the Council has high aspirations for growth as set out in the Council's Corporate Plan and Economic Growth and Regeneration Strategy. The Local Plan looks to support this by identifying, facilitating and helping to deliver the development required. The National Planning Policy Framework requires the Council to plan positively for economic growth and boost housing supply, which is what this Plan seeks to achieve.

Preparing this draft Local Plan has involved some tough and complex decisions including the selection of key sites to accommodate new development.

The levels of development proposed within the draft Plan are based upon robust and up to date evidence of the needs of the district. Thanet’s population is expected to grow significantly over the next 20 years, and new homes and jobs are required to support this. The overall strategy aims for an optimistic and aspirational level of economic growth necessary to bring about the step change that is required in the district. It also aims to deliver the right number and mix of housing required alongside such growth, as well as delivering new open space, and protecting and improving the quality of Thanet’s existing built and natural environment.

It is recognised that any growth in Thanet must be supported by the necessary infrastructure, such as roads, schools and health facilities. The Plan aims to take a co-ordinated approach to delivering such facilities alongside new development, and the Council has and will continue to work with other agencies, organisations and service providers to ensure that this is achieved.

The location of growth set out in this Plan is based upon a district settlement hierarchy and the key principle of focusing new development in locations that are highly accessible, and that can take advantage of and support Thanet’s existing infrastructure and services. Thanet’s established settlement pattern and transport links have evolved over a long period of time, and have been strongly influenced by its coastal location and peninsular geography. The hierarchy aims to inform and underpin policies in this Local Plan to facilitate growth in a manner sustainable in the local context.

The settlement hierarchy is illustrated on Map 4 below:

Map 4 - Settlement Hierarchy

© Crown copyright and database rights 2014 Ordnance Survey 100018261
 
 Description: Housing map 1 - settlement hierarchy

A number of sites and proposals are of fundamental importance to delivering the objectives of the Local Plan. The locations of sites of strategic importance for the Plan are indicated on the Key Diagram below, and the text of Local Plan sets out the relevant specific policies.


Map 5 - Key Diagram


Strategic Priorities and Objectives

The following strategic priorities and objectives set out what this Plan is seeking to do in order to achieve the Council's vision and deliver sustainable development for the district. (No order of priority is implied)

Strategic Priority 1 - Create additional employment and training opportunities, to strengthen and diversify the local economy and improve local earning power and employability.

Objectives:

Strategic Priority 2 - Facilitate the continued regeneration of the coastal town centres, developing their individual niche roles, whilst also consolidating the role and function of Westwood as Thanet’s primary retail centre, ensuring retail expenditure is retained in the district.

Objectives:

Strategic Priority 3 - Provide homes that are accessible to, and suited to the needs and aspirations of, a settled and balanced community.

Objectives:

Strategic Priority 4 - Safeguard local distinctiveness and promote awareness, responsible enjoyment, protection and enhancement of Thanet's environment, including the coast, countryside, rich seaside heritage, historic environment, diverse townscapes and landscape, biodiversity and water environment.

Objectives:

Strategic Priority 5 - Deliver the infrastructure required to support existing communities and new development, including an efficient and effective transport system.

Objectives:

 

 

 

 


 

Strategic Proposals

1     Economic Strategy

Employment Growth

1.1 The Plan's economic strategy sets out how the Thanet's economy should grow, develop and create new jobs and prosperity over the plan period. The economic strategy is based upon a positive and optimistic level of growth. The strategy explains where the growth is expected to take place, and what the Local Plan is doing to support this, alongside the Council's Economic Development and Regeneration Strategy.

1.2 One of the core principles of the National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) is to proactively drive and support sustainable economic development to deliver the homes, business and industrial units, infrastructure and thriving local places that the country needs. It states that planning authorities should set out a clear economic vision and strategy for their areas which positively and proactively encourage sustainable growth, identify strategic sites to meet anticipated needs over the plan period, support existing business sectors and plan for new and emerging sectors. Policies should be flexible to accommodate needs not anticipated and to allow rapid responses to changes in the economy. It also states that clusters or networks of knowledge driven, creative high technology industries should be planned for, priority areas for economic regeneration and infrastructure provision, and environmental enhancement should be identified, and flexible working practices such as the integration of residential and commercial uses within the same unit should be facilitated.

1.3 It further states that plans should avoid the long term protection of sites allocated for employment use where there is no reasonable prospect of the site being used for that purpose.

1.4 The NPPF states that plans should recognise town centres as the heart of their communities and support their vitality and viability, promote competitive town centres that provide customer choice and a diverse retail offer, retain and enhance existing markets and introduce new ones and allocate a range of suitable sites to meet the scale and type of retail, leisure, commercial, office, tourism, cultural, community and residential development needed.

1.5 The NPPF also states that Local Plans should support the sustainable growth and expansion of all types of business and enterprise in the rural areas, promote the development and diversification of agricultural and other land based rural businesses, support sustainable rural tourism and leisure developments that benefits businesses in the rural area and promote the retention and development of local services and community facilities. The Plan’s evidence base should assess the needs of the food production industry and any barriers to investment that planning can resolve.

1.6 Thanet is unique in that it has a diverse economy which is currently strong in the education and health sectors and traditionally has seen above average representation of retail and public administration. Cuts in public sector spending and increased pressure on personal wealth could have an impact on this. However, evidence shows that the tourism and green economy sectors are currently doing well and are expected to increase in the district.

1.7 Thanet also benefits from an airport and port. There is uncertainty regarding the future of the airport, however both offer potential to deliver job growth.

1.8 Thanet’s manufacturing base has always been limited and mainly characterised by small scale business. There has always been a diverse economy in Thanet with tourism historically at its heart. Tourism and leisure continues to be an important component of Thanet’s economy and retail has been particularly strong outperforming all other Kent districts.

1.9 Thanet’s business parks have been slow to develop and there is a significant amount of land available which in itself is an opportunity. Evidence suggests that only 30% of future jobs will be in traditional office, industrial and warehouse (Class B) type uses that are often located on business parks and therefore a flexible approach to Thanet’s employment land is required.

1.10 Thanet has been a tourist destination for many years and whilst the popularity of seaside tourism may have declined it is still important in terms of Thanet’s economy. Total employment across tourism related industries in 2011 was 4,089 employees although around half of these were part time. Tourism accounts for 9% of Thanet’s employment. A good visitor economy can also provide benefits for Thanet residents in terms of leisure facilities, attractive public realm and quality of life which in turn attract business to the area.

1.11 Thanet’s strength in the visitor economy stems from the attractive sandy beaches in close proximity to London, the established successful tourist destination of Broadstairs, the development of the Turner Contemporary Gallery and the strong character of Thanet as a traditional tourist destination. Thanet also contains a wealth of heritage assets which are attractive to visitors with around 2,000 listed buildings.

1.12 Tourism along with the green economy are performing well and with certain developments in these sectors coupled with improved transport and communications infrastructure it is expected that these sectors will grow over the plan period and provide a significant number of jobs.

1.13 The green sector includes agriculture, forestry and fishing and construction activities but it is the growth in the low carbon goods and services and renewable energy and their spin off manufacturing and service businesses that are likely to deliver job growth over the plan period. Thanet has already seen above average development of wind farms, solar farms, anaerobic digesters and other renewable sources of energy production particularly located around the former Richborough Power Station site. The forecasted growth sees the green sector accounting for 12% of the Thanet’s economy by the end of the plan period.

1.14 Ramsgate Port is an infrastructure asset and is important for the green economy sector and as a wharf for the movement of minerals. The Council supports the growth of port related uses and would wish to see the reintroduction of a roll on roll off passenger ferry service.

1.15 Thanet has 7 rural settlements with a population of around 6,000 residents which make up just 4% of the population. The employment land review concludes that Thanet has quite a low representation of rural employment enterprises when compared to the rest of the south east with less than 10% of VAT registered premises being located in the rural areas. Nonetheless the Council wishes to support rural economic development of an appropriate scale.

1.16 The overall target is to deliver a minimum of 5,000 jobs across the district during the plan period to 2031 based on a projection assuming high growth in the tourism and green sectors. The aim of the strategy is to reduce unemployment to 3%. In order to do this it is necessary to understand what sectors have the most potential to deliver.

1.17 Future job growth in Thanet is expected to remain strong in town centre and tourism uses, as well as in public administration, and education. Thanet is a popular retirement area and this brings with it benefits to the economy particularly in terms of the health and caring professions which are expected to grow. Given that Thanet has a diverse economy a flexible economic strategy is needed in order to accommodate all employment generating uses.

1.18 In Thanet’s town centres there is opportunity to capitalise on heritage assets and cultural and creative industries creating hubs of innovation and entrepreneurship. This is increasingly the trend in Margate, particularly the Old Town.

1.19 The Council’s Economic Development and Regeneration Strategy identifies tourism as a key sector to support and enhance. A key element of this is the re-establishment of Dreamland as an amusement park. The Economic Development and Regeneration Strategy also identifies the potential to develop the green sector and capture more economic benefits from the windfarms surrounding Thanet and spin off businesses as opportunities. Growth in these sectors forms the basis of the district’s economic strategy to plan for and deliver at least an additional 5000 jobs.

1.20 In delivering high growth in tourism, the main challenge is to increase visitor spend in Thanet, which can be achieved by encouraging the overnight visitor and developing more of a year round offer.

1.21 The Council has adopted a Destination Management Plan (DMP) which focuses on individual projects bringing together a variety of stakeholders to improve beach management, facilitate coastal regeneration and develop a shared story to improve marketing for visitors.

1.22 30% of overall job growth is still likely to be from the development in B use classes found on business parks. Thanet is strong in smaller manufacturing firms which require smaller industrial units. It is therefore important within the strategy to protect them. A range of employment sites is needed to cater for all types of employment generating development and an element of flexibility is needed.

1.23 Improving education and skills in Thanet is an important part of growing the economy and therefore the Plan seeks to support the provision of these facilities.

1.24 Thanet’s employment offer and relatively peripheral location combined with improving transport and communications infrastructure means that a certain level of commuting is expected. Currently the majority of working age people that live in Thanet work in Thanet with a significant amount commuting to the neighbouring districts of Dover and Canterbury, as well as further afield. Improved rail linkages in the future could further impact on this. This is not necessarily a harmful trend as it brings wealth to the area and better access to jobs which increases local consumer spend further strengthening the retail and leisure professions. It is envisaged particularly that the Discovery Park Enterprise Zone established in Sandwich following the closure of the Pfizer pharmaceutical plant will impact upon out commuting levels, but its close proximity to Thanet is beneficial in terms of retention of wealth in the area as well as potential relocation of firms to Thanet’s nearby employment sites. The proximity of the Enterprise Zone to Thanet is positive for employment and Thanet’s economic strategy takes account of this in order to complement Discovery Park and benefit from it.

1.25 Job growth in the district will be supported, promoted and delivered by;

1.26 It is not possible to predict or plan specifically for the needs of all significant job creating development proposals that may arise over the lifetime of the Plan and only 30% or employment growth is expected to be in the non B use classes that are traditionally located on business parks. The Council wishes to plan positively for all kinds of employment generating development and such proposals whose needs cannot be met within existing or planned provisions will need to be considered in the context of relevant environmental and countryside policies and the aspirations of the strategic priorities. Account will also be taken of prospective benefits arising from additional and better paid local employment.

 

 

The following policy sets out the Economic Strategy for this Plan.

Policy SP02 - Economic Growth

A minimum of 5,000 additional jobs is planned for in Thanet to 2031.

The aim is to accommodate inward investment in job creating development, the establishment of new businesses and expansion and diversification of existing firms. Sufficient sites and premises suited to the needs of business are identified and safeguarded for such uses. Manston Business Park will be the key location for large scale job creating development.

Land is identified and allocated to accommodate at least 65ha of employment space over the period to 2031. Land and premises considered suitable for continued and future employment use will be identified and protected for such purpose.

Thanet's town centres are priority areas for regeneration and employment generating development, including tourism and cultural diversification, will be encouraged.

The growth of the Port of Ramsgate is supported as a source of employment and as an attractor of inward investment.

New tourism development, which would extend or upgrade the range of tourist facilities particularly those that attract the staying visitor, increase the attraction of tourists to the area and extend the season, will be supported.

Development is supported that enhances the rural economy subject to protecting the character, quality and function of Thanet’s rural settlements.

 

Employment Land

1.27 The employment land strategy sets out how the Council proposes to support job growth through the allocation of employment land for development, the safeguarding of existing premises and flexibility regarding the types of development considered appropriate. The supply of employment land is supported by the town centre strategy which also provides land for economic development and job growth.

1.28 The National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) requires that local planning authorities set out a clear economic vision and strategy for their area which positively and proactively encourages sustainable growth, identify strategic sites to meet anticipated needs over the plan period, support existing business sectors and plan for new and emerging sectors. It also requires flexibility and states that the long term protection of sites with little chance of being used for employment purposes should be avoided.

1.29 In accordance with the NPPF an assessment of current and future growth sectors has been carried out along with an assessment of Thanet’s employment sites and land available.

1.30 Forecasts show that Thanet will need in the region of 15 ha of employment land (B1, B2 and B8 uses) over the plan period. Methodology and discussion of this is contained in the employment growth topic paper and the Economic and Employment Assessment 2012.

1.31 The 15 ha is significantly below the amount of land that was allocated in the 2006 Thanet Local Plan.

1.32 The Economic and Employment Assessment in 2012 and the Employment Land Review 2010 both indicate that the land requirement to the end of the plan period is low. This is consistent with past trends showing low take up of employment land. The ELR states 7.7 ha of employment land is needed to 2026 and the Economic and Employment Assessment 2012 states that 15 ha of employment land is needed to 2031. The National Planning Policy Framework requires that we should avoid the long term protection of allocated sites where there is no reasonable prospect of them being used for that purpose. This brings into question the need to maintain an oversupply in Thanet’s employment land portfolio.

1.33 In 2012 the Pfizer pharmaceutical plant at Sandwich closed and the site has been designated as the Discovery Park Enterprise Zone. With the range of benefits offered by its enterprise zone status available just across the district boundary the site is likely to have a positive impact on the demand for employment in Thanet.

1.34 There is a need to provide land for potential inward investment and for growing existing businesses to relocate to. There is also a need for affordable premises for the indigenous market and start up space also fulfills an important role.

1.35 Thanet needs to cater mainly for small to medium sized businesses and tourism related trade. Some land needs to be made available for larger businesses but some of these types of businesses may be drawn towards Discovery Park Enterprise Zone and Thanet’s employment allocations will complement this trend. Some larger established sites such as Pysons Road, Haine Road and Westwood Industrial Estate are in need of some investment to secure their renewal and/or upgrade. Good quality, popular sites that are within the urban and rural confines are retained and protected. Of particular importance are quality sites that support Thanet's small and medium enterprises such as Fullers Yard and Manston Green. As far as possible there is a balanced distribution of sites across the district.

1.36 There is a need to keep a range of sites for cheap premises and business start ups. Thanet also needs to retain some sites that can accommodate uses such as paint spraying and tyre recycling. The range of sites include some in the rural area to support the rural economy. A “flagship” site for inward investment that can also accommodate growing indigenous businesses is provided for at Manston Business Park. There is also a need for “flexible” sites where alternative non Class B uses will be allowed. This reflects the current trend and ensures land is provided to meet all types of economic development.

1.37 Thanet's portfolio of employment sites caters for all of these uses both in terms of new sites and existing sites protected for future employment purposes. The following policy identifies Thanet’s employment allocations, where new employment generating development will be promoted and supported. These sites are shown on maps in Appendix A.

Policy SP03 - Land Allocated for Economic Development

At the following sites land is allocated for business and employment generating purposes:

1. Manston Park, Manston

2. Eurokent Business Park, Ramsgate

3. Thanet Reach Business Park, Broadstairs

4. Hedgend Industrial Estate, St Nicholas

At Manston Park and Hedgend Industrial Estate development will be restricted to use classes B1 (business), B2 (general industry) and B8 (storage and distribution). Thanet Reach Business Park is also suitable for education uses.

 

Map 6 - Manston Business Park

1.38 Manston Business Park is a prime business investment location, being strategically located at the centre of Thanet and adjacent to Manston Airport. It also has easy accessibility from the centres of population, the port at Ramsgate and excellent road links to the rest of Kent and the UK via the A299 and M2.

1.39 Approximately half of the site is owned by East Kent Opportunities which is a joint venture between Kent County Council and Thanet District Council. The aim for the joint venture is to bring forward economic growth and regeneration in Thanet. Manston Business Park is approximately half developed, and there is some infrastructure in place ready for the rest of the site to be developed. Whilst development on the site has been slow to come forward in the past, more recent developments have included speculative business units, and purpose built accommodation. The site provides a good opportunity for existing growing businesses in Thanet to re-locate to.

1.40 The focus for development of the site should be office, industrial and warehousing, whilst some mixed use including additional business support services and training facilities which demand a location outside of Westwood and of the coastal urban belt will be considered appropriate where this would serve to attract new or support existing job creating development.

Policy SP04 – Manston Business Park

Manston Business Park is allocated and safeguarded for business purposes within classes B1 (business), B2 (general industry) and B8 (storage and distribution).

Development proposals will need to comply with all of the following criteria:

1) Provide green infrastructure to create an attractive environment compatible with its location and boundaries adjoining the countryside.

2) Be accompanied by a transport assessment and travel plan unless the development is considered too small to have a significant impact. This should specifically consider improvements to public transport to enable access from Thanet's main residential areas to Manston Business Park by a range of means of transport.

3) Safeguard land traversing the site to accommodate a new road alignment from Columbus Avenue to the Airport and to take account of the need to safeguard the operational capability of Manston Airport.

4) Safeguard land within the site to enable future extension of Columbus Avenue northwards to link directly with the B2050.

 

Manston Airport

1.41 Given the recent closure of Manston Airport, there is an opportunity to review the viability of an operational airport at Manston and to consider future options for the vast area of land around the airport. It is considered that a successful airport has the potential to be a significant catalyst for economic growth. The Council can continue to support proposals that would maintain the operational part of the airport to encourage future air travel and aviation related operation at Manston.

1.42 To safeguard an operational airport at Manston, the Council is aware of the need to prevent developments that might prejudice the future operation and expansion of the airport, or be adversely affected by airport operations. The Civil Aviation Authority has identified development safeguarding zones around the airport. Within these zones, the local planning authority is required to consult the airport operators regarding different forms of development that might affect airport operations. These safeguarding zones should therefore be retained to ensure that the future aviation operations at the airport are not prejudiced.

1.43 The Local Planning Authority will take account of airport feasibility studies and the interest of potential airport operators and the interest of other commercial developers in relation to the future development options, in addition to its own assessment about development which might prejudice the development of the airport.

1.44 In view of the various options available to the Council for the future of the Manston Airport site as an airport operation and aviation activities and other developments, these need to be explored and assessed for the wider area of the airport and its environ through the development plan making process. The area should be designated as an “opportunity area” for which the District Council will prepare Area Action Plan (AAP) Development Plan Document. The AAP for Manston Airport will set out the development framework for the development and regeneration of the area. A consideration of the AAP should be the promotion, retention, development and expansion of the airport and aviation related operations. This should be supported by a feasibility study and a viable business plan. The alternative option for the AAP should be to assess mixed-use development that will deliver significant new high quality skilled and semi-skilled employment opportunities, residential development, sustainable transport and community facilities. These options should be subject to Habitat Directive and Habitat Regulation assessment (HRA).

 

Policy SP05 – Manston Airport

The site of Manston Airport and the adjoining area will be designated as an “Opportunity Area” for the purposes of preparing the Manston Airport Area Action Plan” Development Plan Document. The Manston Airport AAP will explore through the development plan process the future development options for the site of the airport and the adjoining area. A consideration of the AAP should be the retention, development and expansion of the airport and aviation operations where supported by a feasibility study and a viable Business Plan, while exploring alternative options for the future development of the area for mixed-use development.

Whilst the Manston Airport Area Action Plan is being prepared and until adopted by the Council as a development plan for the Manston Airport area, the following policy for the Manston Airport will apply.

Proposals at the airport, that would support the development, expansion and diversification of Manston Airport, will be permitted subject to all of the following requirements.

1) That there be demonstrable compliance by the applicants with the terms of the current agreement under section 106 of the Town and Country Planning Act 1990 as amended or subsequent equivalent legislation.

2) That new built development is to be designed to minimise visual impact on the open landscape of the central island. Particular attention must be given to roofscape for the purposes of minimising the mass of the buildings at the skyline when viewed from the south.

3) The provision of an appropriate landscaping scheme, to be designed and implemented as an integral part of the development.

4) That any application for development for the purpose of increasing aircraft movements in the air or on the ground, auxiliary power or engine testing, be supported by an assessment of cumulative noise impact and the effectiveness of mitigation measures to be implemented in order to minimise pollution and disturbance. The acceptability of proposals will be judged in relation to any identified and cumulative noise impact, the effectiveness of mitigation and the social and economic benefits of the proposals.

5) The provision of an air quality assessment in compliance with the Air Quality Management Plan to demonstrate that the development will not lead to a harmful deterioration in air quality. Permission will not be given for development that would result in national air quality objectives being exceeded.

6) That any new development which would generate significant surface traffic must meet requirements for surface travel demand.

7) That it must be demonstrated both that new development cannot contaminate groundwater sources and that appropriate mitigation measures will be incorporated in the development to prevent contamination.

8) There will be no significant harm to Thanet’s SSSI/SAC/SPA/Ramsar sites. A Habitats Regulations Assessment will be required.

 


 

2 - Town Centre Strategy

2.1 The town centre strategy sets out how Thanet's town centres will develop, the inter-relationship between them, and how the towns’ commercial functions will support and contribute to the overall economic strategy for the district.

2.2 The National Planning Policy Framework states that planning policies should be positive and promote competitive town centre environments and set out policies for their management and growth over the plan period. Plans should recognise town centres as the heart of the community and pursue their vitality and viability. A network of centres should be defined that reflects the relationship between them in order to guide future development.

2.3 The strategy for Thanet’s town centres seeks to reinforce the different but complementary roles of the primary centre at Westwood and of the coastal town centres of Margate, Ramsgate and Broadstairs. The objectives of the hierarchy are to:

2.4 The Council is required to set out a network and hierarchy of centres. Identifying the existing hierarchy provides an understanding of the role and function of the town centres and their inter-relationship. A major factor in determining the role of the centres is the catchment which they serve. Canterbury is the pre-dominant centre in the wider sub region of East Kent. Thanet’s hierarchy of centres is set out below:

2.5 Westwood - This centre sits at the top of the hierarchy as it caters for high order need, attracts the major national retailers and has a catchment that covers the whole of Thanet as well extending to areas outside of the district.

2.6 Coastal Town Centres - Margate, Broadstairs and Ramsgate. The catchments of these town centres are their individual town populations and tourist trade with a wide range of shops to cater for everyday need, special interest and tourism. These towns have traditionally attracted national retailers and services as well as local businesses.

2.7 District Centres - Cliftonville, Westgate, Birchington and Minster. These centres cater for local needs and services. They serve large residential and semi-rural locations but catchments are limited and these locations are not appropriate for large scale retail development.

2.8 Local Centres - Several across the district such as Westbrook and St Peters. These cater for a more restricted local need and tend to have a small catchment. These centres provide services such as takeaways, hairdressers and small convenience stores. Business is often local rather than the national multiples. These centres are not appropriate for large scale retail development.

2.9 The Council wishes to maintain the current retail hierarchy as it has been functioning successfully. Thanet currently retains 84% of retail expenditure within the district and given this healthy retention rate there is no need to increase Thanet’s market share within the sub region. However, in order to maintain the current market share the following growth will be required over the plan period:

2.10 Convenience retailing is currently skewed towards the large supermarkets clustered around the Westwood area and this trend is likely to continue. However, the Council would like to encourage more convenience provision within the coastal town centres.

2.11 In addition to this an assessment has been made of other uses that are traditionally found in high street locations and support the retail function of centres – these include uses such as banks, building societies restaurants, take aways, and drinking establishments and are known in planning terms as the A2-A5 use classes. The assessment concluded that a total of 9,560 square metres of such floorspace is needed in the district to support the retail function of town centres. Much of this is shown to be needed at Westwood although uses such as restaurants would support the tourism appeal of the coastal town centres.

2.12 Town centres are hubs of the community and as such are not just retail areas. They contain a number of uses including leisure and tourism. Although no need for major commercial leisure facilities such as cinemas has been identified there is a need to be flexible within the town centres in order to support the tourism economy.

Table 1 below sets out the retail need for Thanet's town centres:

Table 1 - Thanet's Retail Need

Convenience sqm

Comparison (high street goods) sqm

A2-A5 uses sqm

Total Need sqm

Westwood

1,154

27,870

7,256

36,280

Margate

1,123

1,372

624

3,119

Broadstairs

792

4,091

1,221

6,104

Ramsgate

376

584

240

1,200

 

Policy SP06 – Thanet’s Town centres

Provision is made for a range of town centre uses reflecting the individual role, character and heritage of the town centres, including provision for retail development as referred in Table 1 above.

 

Westwood

2.13 Westwood has emerged as a commercial hub between the coastal towns. Its Westwood Cross town centre, established in 2005 has served to stem leakage of retail expenditure outside the district. The primary task of the Local Plan will be to guide land use and investments that will maintain its role.

2.14 The Plan's vision is that Westwood has developed and consolidated into a mixed use hub with an excellent range of homes, schools, leisure, sports, shops and other facilities in a pleasant and convenient environment. New homes close to the town centre sustain and benefit from a wide range of services which are accessible on foot and by cycle. In particular the presence of the University, the Marlowe Academy and Innovation Centre have helped create a diverse and enterprising community.

The key issues for Westwood are:

2.15 Westwood Cross opened in June 2005 consolidating what had become piecemeal retail development in the Westwood area. Since its opening there have been a number of further developments such as the development of the leisure complex and numerous developments at and improvements to the surrounding retail parks. Westwood has proved highly successful in its aims of clawing back retail expenditure formerly lost to locations outside the district boundary. It has secured its place as the preferred location for the large format style of retailing favoured by the national chains. This style and scale of retail was never before available in Thanet.

2.16 Figures show that in the region of 27,000 square metres of retail floorspace is needed at Westwood to maintain the status quo. However, much of this floorspace is already taken up by recent permissions leaving no reason to significantly expand the boundaries of the town centre. The remaining floorspace need at Westwood to the end of the plan period can be accommodated amongst the existing town centre development by way of redevelopment and re configuration.

2.17 Sainsburys have an approval for a major redevelopment of the site which comprises approximately 14,000 square metres of convenience floorspace as well as an element of retail floorspace selling high street goods. The scheme includes improvements to the road layout around the Westwood area and will improve traffic flow.

2.18 The adjacent housing allocation and flexible employment allocation at Eurokent supports tourism and leisure uses as well as B1 uses and will serve to add footfall to the town centre and increase its vitality, viability, accessibility and sustainability

2.19 In addition to the 1020 new homes under construction, Westwood is identified as a wider strategic housing allocation to enable its development as a sustainable mixed use business and residential community.

2.20 Westwood embraces a number of distinct areas which together will serve to transform it into a new business and residential community. It will also integrate with neighbouring communities including Newington, an area suffering deprivation, and whose residents will benefit from connectivity to its amenities and services. As a location for strategic housing development, Westwood represents a major opportunity to redress the over-supply of flats in Thanet. This also provides the opportunity to create a strategic area of natural and semi-natural green space to increase provision of such open space in the district.

2.21 The area currently suffers from poor connectivity between sites, both vehicular and pedestrian. This is a challenge that needs to be addressed in the future development of Westwood.

2.22 Westwood lies at the intersection of the A256 and A254 and retains a partially piecemeal development pattern. Following the opening of Westwood Cross in 2005 alongside other retail parks and leisure development, the area has become a destination in its own right as well as a through route for traffic travelling into and out of the district and between Margate and Ramsgate. A key issue for Westwood will be to facilitate vehicular access to and around the area without the need to enter onto the main roundabout at the intersection of the A256 and A254.

2.23 Facilities to provide for public transport and encourage walking and cycling were established as part of the town centre development, including a bus hub for the frequent Loop bus service.

2.24 As part of the housing and commercial development already permitted in the area and now under construction, new road infrastructure is being provided which will help relieve peak time traffic congestion at the A256/A254 roundabout. However, inherent growth and development proposed in the Local Plan will potentially add to traffic flows compounding the need for a more comprehensive solution.

2.25 A Relief Scheme is in preparation to address this issue, which the Council will seek to implement. This will require developer-led solutions. A fundamental objective of this Scheme will be to realign traffic routes to enable free movement by pedestrians between town centre facilities.

2.26 As an emerging business and residential community there is scope to provide, locate and co-locate community services such as GP, youth service and library and other cultural facilities so as to be highly accessible on foot and by public transport.

2.27 Development proposals including residential may be required to provide for or contribute towards their provision, taking account of the plans and programmes of the service providers.

2.28 Jackey Bakers sports ground is Thanet’s main area for sports and recreation purposes. The site provides the best opportunity to both enhance existing facilities, and in the longer term, to increase the level of facilities. There are current proposals for a new astro-turf pitch and pavilion with changing facilities.

Map 7 - Westwood Policy Map

 

Policy SP07 - Westwood

The Council will seek to support the evolution and development of Westwood as a mixed use business and residential community in line with the following area based policies, indicated on Map 7.

Development (in the vicinity of Westwood) will be required to have regard to and contribute towards implementation of a Westwood Relief Scheme. Development that would prejudice implementation of the Scheme will not be permitted. New development should also seek to improve pedestrian connectivity.

1) Westwood Town Centre

Retail development will be directed to the core town centre area at Westwood and complementary town centre uses will be accommodated within the wider town centre boundary, as defined by the primary and secondary frontages. Any development proposals should ensure there is no net loss in overall commercial floorspace.

2) Eurokent Mixed Use Area

Development of Eurokent will be for a mix of residential and business purposes, in accordance with a comprehensive development masterplan linking and integrating the development into the wider Westwood community.

Land at Eurokent will provide for:

The masterplan shall incorporate, be informed by and/or address the following:

Proposals will be accompanied by a Transport Assessment informing the masterplan and including assessment of impact of development on the local road network and demonstrating measures to promote multi-modal access, including footway and cycleway connections and an extended bus service accessible to the development. Development will be expected to provide an appropriate contribution to offsite highway improvements in respect of Westwood Relief Scheme, improvements to the A256 from Lord of the Manor and any other improvements identified in the Transport Assessment.

3) Thanet Reach Mixed Use Area

In accordance with Policy SP03 part of Thanet Reach is allocated for employment and education uses. The southern part of the site is allocated for residential development.

 

Margate

2.29 The vision for Margate is for it to evolve into a contemporary seaside resort based on its unique assets of a sandy beach, harbour, rich townscape, and on the success of a revived Dreamland Heritage Amusement Park and the Turner Contemporary Gallery. Margate’s economic heart will be diversified through creative and cultural development and the town will no longer suffer disproportionately high levels of deprivation, transience and poor quality accommodation.

2.30 Positive signs of this step change are beginning to emerge with a 59% increase recorded in contacts to the Visitor Information Centre from November 2012 to March 2013, the second winter period since the Turner Contemporary opened.

2.31 Margate has experienced the most dramatic changes of all of the three major seaside towns in Thanet. Its decline from its position as one of the premier mass market holiday resorts in the mid-20th century is the main reason for the high levels of vacancy and decay along the seafront, High Street and the former hotel suburb of Cliftonville. Its historic development has provided a legacy of an old town and harbour and adjacent Georgian squares whose quality and presence is not fully acknowledged or appreciated.

2.32 Margate has a number of commercial areas such as the Old Town, College Square and the upper and lower High Street areas that perform different functions around the town. The upper and lower High Street along with the seafront have suffered from high vacancy rates although this is now beginning to improve.

2.33 The Old Town area is a vibrant part of the town which contains many restaurants, cafes, gift shops and galleries. This area is popular with tourists and local people alike. This area of the town lends itself to tourism and leisure uses.

2.34 Considerable progress has been made towards safeguarding Margate’s built heritage and diversifying its economy. A ‘Townscape Heritage Initiative’ (THI) historic building grant scheme, jointly funded by Thanet District Council and the Heritage Lottery fund, was operated in the Old Town area between 2003 and 2008 dispensing £1.2m in grants. Through this scheme, many properties which had been unused for many years were brought back into beneficial use as independent shops and cafes and creative businesses. In addition, major funding has been secured for the regeneration of Dreamland Amusement Park. Kent County Council, the Arts Council England and SEEDA also demonstrated their commitment to the town through the successful completion of the Turner Contemporary Gallery.

2.35 Building upon this Dalby Square conservation area in Cliftonville West was designated in July 2010, and further designations are being considered. The Heritage Lottery Fund together with Thanet District Council agreed to fund another Townscape Heritage Initiative grant scheme within the designated conservation area (which includes Dalby Square and parts of Arthur Road and Dalby Road), totaling £2.5m. The scheme's aim is specifically to improve the built environment of the area. It officially started in January 2013 and will run for 5 years.

2.36 Dreamland Amusement Park is synonymous with Margate as a seaside resort. The park closed after the 2006 season. Since its closure the Council has worked, alongside partners, to re-open Dreamland as an amusement park. The Council has compulsory purchased the site and wishes to realise a comprehensive scheme for Dreamland, maximising its potential to contribute to the economic well-being and attractiveness of Margate as a visitor destination.

2.37 The vision is for the amusement park to open comprising historic rides with classic side shows, cafes, restaurants, special events, festivals and gardens incorporating the restored famous scenic railway. This would serve as a major tourist attraction in Margate and a key part of the town’s regeneration.

2.38 The run down Lido complex is situated close to the Margate Winter Gardens and Turner Contemporary and, given its coastal location, provides an ideal opportunity for a leisure/tourism related development with uninterrupted sea views. The site is also an important heritage asset but is in need of significant restoration and repair, which the Council considers should be the main focus for any redevelopment proposals.

2.39 Strategic Local Plan designations that are expected to help deliver the continued regeneration of Margate include Margate’s Town Centre and Old Town area, Margate’s seafront area, and Dreamland.

2.40 Margate has a number of sites which present the opportunity for mixed use re development that potentially include residential. These will also contribute to the overall vibrancy and energy of the town. These sites include Arlington House, the Rendezvous site, the Centre, the Cottage car park and Bilton Square.

2.41 The Arlington House site is a highly prominent site in Margate and has permission for a supermarket. This decision is currently subject to legal challenge. Should this development not commence the Council considers that this site is suitable for mixed use redevelopment.

2.42 The strategy for Margate’s core area is to support retail uses including banks, restaurants and drinking establishments in the Primary shopping frontage centred around the upper and lower High Street. The Old Town area will provide a range of town centre uses including cultural and creative industries. There will also be a designated Margate Seafront and Harbour Arm area that supports and encourages seafront leisure uses that are sympathetic to the surrounding seafront architecture. Evidence shows that in Margate there is a need for an additional 3,119 square metres of retail floorspace to the end of the plan period. Current vacancy levels and the wider town centre designations can adequately accommodate this need.

2.43 Seafront areas are important to the vitality and viability of the coastal town centres as they attract tourists and provide a natural leisure focus for the towns in close proximity to the High Streets and main shopping areas. As such it is important that leisure and tourism uses are encouraged here that are complementary to the town centres and that encourage economic growth.

2.44 The cultural and economic regeneration of Margate needs to be supported by strategies that tackle the poor housing conditions and imbalances in the market. There is an important relationship between Margate's regeneration and the need to address the social, economic and environmental problems in west Cliftonville which are associated with its concentration of poor quality private rented accommodation. This will require a range of specific planned initiatives and interventions. In addition comprehensive regeneration will need to promote attractive and convenient links between Cliftonville West and Margate Seafront and town.

Map 8 - Margate Policy Map

 

 

 

Policy SP08 – Margate

The Council will seek to support the continued regeneration and development of Margate as a contemporary seaside resort in line with the following area based proposals, indicated on Map 8.

1) Margate Town Centre

The focus for retail development will be in and around the High Street as defined by the Primary and Secondary Frontages.

2) Margate Old Town

Margate’s Old Town area will continue in its complementary role, contributing to the vitality and viability of Margate’s town centre, increasing footfall and enhancing quality and choice of facilities in the town centre. It will be a focal location for creative and cultural industries. Residential development will be permitted above ground floor level only and the Council will resist the loss of existing commercial premises in the area.

3) Margate Seafront and Harbour Arm

Within the seafront area of Margate and the Harbour Arm as indicated on Map 8, leisure and tourism uses will be permitted, including retail, where they enhance the visual appeal of these areas and protect the seafront character and heritage. Residential development above ground floor will be permitted.

4) Dreamland

Dreamland will be developed as an amusement park and be a significant visitor attraction supporting the regeneration of the town.

Proposals that seek to extend, upgrade or improve the attractiveness of Dreamland as an amusement park will be permitted. Development that would lead to a reduction in the attractiveness, leisure or tourist potential will be resisted. Exceptionally, development of a limited part of the site may be accepted as a part of a comprehensive scheme for the upgrading and improvement of the amusement park. The scheme will be required to demonstrate that the future viability of the amusement park can be assured and the Council will negotiate a legal agreement to ensure that the proposed development and the agreed investment in the amusement park are carried out in parallel.

In the event that evidence, in the form of an independent professional assessment, is submitted (and accepted by the Council) as demonstrating that it is not economically viable to operate an amusement park on the whole or majority of the site in the foreseeable future, then proposals for redevelopment may be accepted subject to:

5) Opportunity Sites

There are Opportunity Sites identified on Map 8 which are considered suitable for mixed use town centre development. Residential development will be considered acceptable where this does not conflict with the area based criteria above.

6) The Lido

Proposals for leisure and tourism related uses will be supported at the Lido. Any development must respect and restore the site's status as a significant heritage asset.

Any development permitted by this policy must not adversely affect any designated nature conservation sites either directly or as a result of increased visitor pressure.

 

Ramsgate

2.45 The vision for Ramsgate is for maritime heritage, Royal Harbour, marina, beach and attractive waterfront, to provide the underlying flavour and economic base of its vibrant mix of town centre uses, visitor economy and café culture. The former surplus of small shops beyond the town's commercial core has been refurbished to provide quality residential accommodation and there is a viable balance and mix of residential and commercial use including specialty shopping.

2.46 Like Margate, Ramsgate has been adversely affected by the decline of the traditional resort holiday. However, with its magnificent Royal Harbour and nautical atmosphere Ramsgate has been quicker to recover. A café culture has developed around the harbour area and this needs to be further encouraged. With assistance from area based renewal programmes, shops once empty are being converted to new homes, around a stronger commercial core. However, some neighbourhoods of the town centre hinterland such as parts of the east cliff area are still visibly in need of social, economic and physical revitalisation.

2.47 The key issue for Ramsgate town will be to maintain momentum so as to further improve the vitality, diversity and economic vibrancy of the town centre, secure refurbishment of the generally fine but often tarnished stock of historic buildings, support development of the visitor economy including cultural creativity, attract more economically active residents and strengthen the range of local services.

2.48 Ramsgate contains many separate commercial areas. As well as at the traditional focal point of the High Street commercial development has stretched to the upper High Street and the length of King Street. Over recent years as with all high streets Ramsgate has seen an increase in vacancies and commercial development has become somewhat sporadic and in some cases run down. The strategy of the Council has been and continues to be to draw commercial development back to the commercial heart of Ramsgate and allow the more peripheral areas of the town centre to revert to residential use. This strategy has been showing results and Ramsgate is benefitting from an improved public realm and so it is appropriate for this policy approach to be continued.

2.49 Ramsgate has a need for an additional 1,200 square metres of retail floorspace. The current vacancies and scale of the town centre boundary can adequately accommodate this in the plan period.

2.50 Retail development will be focused in Ramsgate’s core area with complementary town centre uses accommodated within the wider town centre boundary. Leisure and tourism uses will be particularly encouraged around the marina area.

2.51 Land at and adjacent to Ramsgate harbour is identified for a mix of uses including leisure, tourism, retail and residential purposes. Any proposals should have regard to the emerging Ramsgate Maritime Plan or any future plan for the port and Royal Harbour.

2.52 The Royal Harbour and historic waterfront are important for both leisure and commercial users which is important for the vibrancy of the town. The seafront area already has a thriving cafe culture. The Royal Harbour is a Grade II* listed structure and is at the heart of Ramsgate Conservation area. The regeneration of Ramsgate depends on the continued attractiveness of the Royal Harbour and new development in this area will need to preserve and enhance its character and appearance. It is a tourism and leisure attraction with significant potential and already offers much to smaller pleasure craft. Commercial fishing and ship repair are also carried out in the Royal Harbour.

2.53 The growth of the Port of Ramsgate (Kent's second Cross Channel port) is supported as a source of employment and as an attractor of inward investment. The Kent Minerals and Waste Local Plan 2013-2030 proposes to safeguard the port for the importation of minerals into Kent. In addition to the potential growth of port trade including passenger ferry operations, there is additional employment associated with marine engineering, including the use of the port as a base to assemble and maintain offshore wind turbines, and other businesses benefiting from a port location.

2.54 The Council is producing a Ramsgate Maritime Plan which supports the Council’s regeneration goal of accelerating economic growth to achieve greater productivity and profit for business in and around the port, more jobs, and increased prosperity for residents and in particular:

Further development will be permitted at Ramsgate Port that supports the aims of the Ramsgate Maritime Plan or any future plan which the Council adopts.

2.55 Any business plans and supplementary guidance will have regard to the need to make optimum use of the existing port land to protect and support diversification of its function.

2.56 Recognising the proximity of the port to the Sandwich Bay -Thanet Coast SSSI/ SPA/Ramsar Site and Marine SAC, development proposals for growth would be subject to the Habitat Regulations and will need sensitive consideration in relation to nature conservation and landscape. Proposals would need an acceptable environmental assessment of their impact on the Harbour, its setting and surrounding property, and the impact of any proposed land reclamation upon nature conservation, conservation of the built environment, the coast and archaeological heritage, together with any proposals to mitigate the impact.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Map 9 - Ramsgate Policy Map

 

Policy SP09 – Ramsgate

The Council will seek to support the continued regeneration and development of Ramsgate focusing around its maritime heritage and developing leisure role, in line with the following area based proposals, indicated on Map 9.

1) Ramsgate Town Centre

The main focus for retail shall be the central High Street/Queen Street/King Street/Harbour Street area of the town and complementary town centres uses will be permitted in the wider town centre area, as defined by the primary and secondary frontages.

2) Ramsgate Waterfront and Royal Harbour

Land at and adjacent to Ramsgate Royal Harbour, as indicated on Map 9, is identified for development for a mixture of leisure, tourism, retail and residential purposes.

Any such proposals should have regard to the emerging Ramsgate Maritime Plan or any subsequent plan adopted by the Council. The following activities and development will be supported:

All proposals must:

3) Opportunity Sites

There are Opportunity Sites identified on Map 9 which are considered suitable for mixed use town centre development. Residential development will be considered acceptable where this does not conflict with the area based criteria above.

4) Ramsgate Port

The Council supports further development at Ramsgate Port which would facilitate its improvement as a port for shipping, increase traffic through the port, and introduce new routes and complementary land based facilities including marine engineering, subject to:-

Land reclamation will not be permitted beyond the western extremity of the existing limit of reclaimed land.

Any development permitted by this policy must not adversely affect any designated nature conservation sites either directly or as a result of increased visitor pressure.

Broadstairs

2.57 Broadstairs is an attractive town with a thriving town centre and is a popular location for visitors and residents who enjoy its heritage, Dickensian past, beach, local events and picturesque waterfront. Broadstairs has a strong commercial and visitor economy and has been resilient during the economic downturn. It is important to maintain and enhance the town's attractive character and economic base.

2.58 Broadstairs is a popular shopping destination characterised by small independently owned shops. The town has many independent shops interspersed with cafes, restaurants and drinking establishments that have enabled the town to buck the trend of high vacancy rates. The town has a particular demand for retail premises selling high street style goods (comparison goods).

2.59 There is a need for in the region of 6,000 square metres of additional retail floorspace to the end of the plan period. The prime focus for retail is centered around the High Street but with supporting town centre uses along Albion Street and the upper end of High Street towards the railway station. The town centre is largely linear in character and there is little scope for physical expansion and development. In order to accommodate retail need in the future it will be necessary to be flexible and allow some development on the edge of the town centre as close as possible to the High Street.

2.60 Broadstairs promenade and beach front is an important part of the town and is an attraction in itself, drawing families to the area. It contains a mix of cafes, restaurants and drinking establishments as well as residential uses and areas of open space. It is important that existing commercial premises are retained in order to maintain the commercial function of this area as a link between the beach and the High Street. Development in this area should contribute to and support the vibrancy of the town centre but also respect its peaceful and unique character.

2.61 The town is linear in style with separate beachfront and town centre areas and the town would benefit from improved pedestrian connectivity between these two areas.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Map 10 - Broadstairs Policy Map

 

Policy SP10 - Broadstairs

The Council will seek to support proposals that maintain and enhance the role and character of Broadstairs as a popular attractive small seaside town in line with the following area based proposals, indicated on Map 10.

1) Broadstairs Town Centre

The focus for retail will be the lower High Street and Albion Street with complementary town centre uses in the wider area, in accordance with the Primary and Secondary Frontages.

New retail development will be acceptable on the edge of Broadstairs town centre, subject to Policy E05. Proposals will be required to provide direct pedestrian links to the High Street, be well related to the retail core, centres of population and be accessible by a range of means of transport.

2) Broadstairs Promenade and Beach Front

Opportunities to enhance the use and attractiveness of the promenade, seafront and beach are welcomed particularly where they achieve improved connectivity between the town centre and beach front. Within this area small scale leisure and tourism uses will be permitted, including retail, where they do not harm the character and heritage interest of the surrounding area. Within Victoria Gardens open space policies will prevail. Change of use of existing commercial premises in this area will be resisted.

Any development permitted by this policy must not adversely affect any designated nature conservation sites either directly or as a result of increased visitor pressure.

 

 

 


 

3 - Housing Strategy

3.1 The Plan's housing strategy sets out how the Local Plan seeks to meet the housing needs of Thanet alongside other partners including the Council's housing regeneration, empty property and strategy functions. The Local Plan proposes to do this by:

3.2 The National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) aims to boost the housing supply and expects Local Plans to meet the full objectively assessed needs for market and affordable homes.

3.3 The key driver of housing growth in Thanet has been the number of in-comers choosing to live in the district. Further in-migration will be needed to provide an adequate labour supply to deliver the economic strategy.

3.4 The Council's Housing Strategy seeks to create sustainable communities, recognising the need for Thanet's residents to have access to high quality housing which they can afford.

3.5 In particular it recognises the need for a greater emphasis on provision of family homes, that need for affordable housing outweighs supply, the importance of bringing empty property back into use to provide new homes, and the need to work with the private sector to drive up standards in the private rented sector. Its main objectives are to: -

3.6 Reflecting this, an imperative of the housing strategy of the Local Plan will be to facilitate delivery of the type and quality of homes that will meet the needs of settled and mixed communities including in particular those aspiring to take advantage of and generate new employment opportunities.

 

Amount of Housing

3.7 Housing provision is made for 12,000 additional homes over the 20 year period to 2031. This reflects forecasts based on recent migration trend based population projections and the labour requirements supporting the Council’s aspirations for economic and employment growth. In line with the forecasts the housing provision is attributed evenly over four 5 year periods.

Policy SP11 - Housing Provision

Provision is made for a total of 12,000 additional homes in the period to 2031, with notional delivery across the period as indicated below.

Period

2011-16

2016-21

2021-26

2026-31

Total

Additional homes

3000

3000

3000

3000

12000

 

Location of Housing

3.8 Identification and allocation of housing land has been informed by assessment of the sustainability of individual sites through the Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment alongside the strategy for the planned location of homes whose key principles are to:-

This approach has been informed by, and serves to formalise, a settlement hierarchy indicated diagrammatically on Map 11.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Map 11 - Settlement Hierarchy

© Crown copyright and database rights 2014 Ordnance Survey 100018261
 
 Description: Housing map 1 - settlement hierarchy

3.9 A number of allocated sites are of strategic importance for delivering the quantity and type and variety of homes required to deliver the strategy. These are identified as Strategic sites. The distribution of allocated housing land is illustrated in Table 2.

3.10 Within total housing provision shown below the Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment suggests capacity to deliver some 2,950 dwellings exists by way of sites which have already received planning permission. In addition some 400 dwellings have already been delivered since the start of the Plan period.

Table 2 - Total Housing Provision

Period

2011-2031

Strategic Sites

Westwood

1450

Birchington on Sea

1000

Westgate on Sea

1000

Manston Green

700

Non-Strategic Sites/areas

Westwood

1405

Margate & Cliftonville

1267

Ramsgate

1827

Broadstairs & St Peters

483

Birchington on Sea

138

Wesgate on Sea

199

Rural Settlements

485

Windfall/broad area

1644

Completed since 2011

402

Total

12000

 

Area Specific Objectives

3.11 Reflecting the make-up of the housing stock and specific issues in different parts of Thanet, the Council has identified, and will seek to achieve, the following area based objectives. It will expect applications for residential development to demonstrate that full account has been taken of these.

Table 3 - Area Specific Objectives

 

Area

 

Area specific housing objectives

District wide

Increase the proportion of houses (non flatted homes) within the overall dwelling stock.

Safeguard and increase the stock of family homes.

Increase the stock of affordable homes

Safeguard and enhance the character and amenity of existing residential neighbourhoods.

Westwood

Transform the neighbourhood into a mixed business and residential community benefiting from mutual proximity, accessibility and supporting amenity infrastructure.

Contribute a significant addition to the district’s stock of non-flatted accommodation including family sized houses and of affordable homes.

Coastal town centres

Contribute to area regeneration objectives expressed in policy or supplementary guidance, and, where appropriate, in line with specific site development briefs.

Cliftonville West & Margate

Establish a mixed, inclusive and settled community through improvements to the quality and configuration of residential accommodation and its environment and diversity of tenure.

Apply public sector intervention and finance to pump-prime private sector investment.

King Street, Ramsgate

Improve the visual appearance of the area and provide good quality housing that is affordable and well managed.

Newington & Millmead

Establish a mixed, inclusive and settled community through improvements to the quality and configuration of residential accommodation and to the local environment and diversity of tenure.

Rural settlements

Accommodate additional homes to provide locational choice at a scale compatible with the size and character of the settlement and in light of accessibility of services and community facilities.

Increase the stock of affordable housing at a scale commensurate with any outstanding local need.

 

Strategic Housing Allocations

Strategic Housing Site Allocations.

3.12 The existing built up areas of the district will continue to deliver additional housing. However, a significant amount of greenfield housing land is required to meet the housing target. Assessment has revealed that some of the suitable and sustainably located greenfield sites identified are large and some are adjoining or in mutual proximity. These sites provide the opportunity to deliver development at a scale that will serve both to facilitate a step change in delivering the type of homes required to meet need and secure the infrastructure required to support them. Such large and clustered sites have been identified as strategic housing allocations that will be of particular importance in delivering the Plan’s housing objectives.

3.13 The geographical extent indicated for individual strategic site allocations represents the anticipated maximum land requirement. Proposals will be expected to consider, and where possible accommodate, notional maximum dwelling capacities indicated together with all other relevant policy requirements within a lower level of greenfield land take. This section identifies, and sets out policies for, housing sites of strategic significance to the Local Plan strategy.

 

Policy SP12 - Strategic Housing Site Allocations.

The sites listed below are identified as Strategic Housing Sites. Applications to develop such sites shall be accompanied by a detailed development brief including an illustrative site masterplan featuring all elements of the proposal and indicating phasing of development and supporting infrastructure. Applications will be determined in light of the following site specific policies:

A - Westwood

B - Birchington

C - Westgate on Sea

D - Manston Green

 

Policy SP13 Strategic Housing Sites - Manston Green

Land is allocated for up to 700 new dwellings at a maximum density of 35 dwellings per hectare net at land known as Manston Green. Built development will be focused at the northern part of the site taking account of the considerations below. Proposals will be judged and permitted only in accordance with a development brief and masterplan for the whole site incorporating

1) a minimum of 9 ha of open space in accordance with the standards set out in Table 7,

2) a fully serviced area of 2.05 ha (to be provided at the cost of the developer) to accommodate a new two-form entry primary school,

3) small scale convenience retail provision required to accessibly serve day to day needs of the development.

Phasing of development will be in accordance with Policy H01(1). The development shall provide for construction of the school to one-form entry at such stage of development as required by the County Council as education authority.

Masterplanning will be informed by and address:

1) pre-design archaeological assessment taking account of presence of significant and sensitive remains,

2) the setting of listed buildings at Ozengall,

3) the need for disposition of development and landscaping to enable a soft edge between the site and open countryside and minimise impact on long views southwards toward Pegwell Bay,

4) predicted aircraft noise,

5) the alignment of the runway and the operational needs of the airport,

6) sustainable urban drainage taking account of the site’s location in the Groundwater Primary Source Protection Zone,

7) the need to clearly demonstrate how the SPA mitigation strategy as set out in Policy SP25 is being met and how it will ensure that development does not increase recreational pressure on designated sites,

8) a wintering and breeding bird survey to assess impact on bird populations within the district and the need to mitigate/compensate,

9) liaison with service providers to investigate the need to upgrade the capacity of any utility services and infrastructure,

10) a statement of social impacts arising from the development and how any increased demand on community facilities will be addressed.

A minimum of 30% of all dwellings will be affordable homes in accordance with Policy SP19. The design brief should feature and reflect investigation of the need to incorporate an element of housing to meet the needs of particular groups including specifically sheltered and extra care homes. The proportion of houses as opposed to flats should exceed that in policy SP18 as much as possible.

Proposals will be accompanied by a Transport Assessment informing the Masterplan including:

1) assessment of the impact of development on the local road network; in particular capacity issues affecting junctions along Haine Road including that with Staner Hill,

2) demonstrating measures to promote multi-modal access, including footway and cycleway connections and an extended bus service accessible to the residential development.

Development will be expected to provide an appropriate contribution to off-site highway improvements.

3.14 Westgate-on-Sea and Birchington, along with Garlinge and Westbrook form part of the continuous urban coastal belt of Thanet, located to the west of Margate.

3.15 Westgate comprises in the main high quality residential environments and was originally developed as a seaside resort for the upper and middle classes. It has a small commercial centre which serves the surrounding residential community, and a train station with routes to Margate, and the rest of Thanet, as well as Faversham and London. Between Westgate and Margate are the smaller suburbs of Westbrook and Garlinge, both of which also have small commercial centres that serve the local community.

3.16 Although forming part of the urban coastal belt, Birchington is a large village with an existing population of approximately 10,100. It has a good sized and well-functioning commercial centre which serves the surrounding residential community. The village has a train station with routes to Margate, and the rest of Thanet as well as Faversham and London, with regular bus services running to Canterbury. Birchington Square lies on the main route to Margate for those travelling into the district from the west, and as such at peak times suffers from traffic congestion. This has also resulted in the area suffering from higher levels of air pollution.

3.17 These settlements are considered to be sustainable locations for new development, with good access to local services, including schools and other community facilities, as well as convenient transport options to the rest of Thanet and locations outside of the district.

Policy SP14 - Strategic Housing Site at Birchington

Land is allocated for up to 1,000 new dwellings at a maximum density of 35 dwellings per hectare net at Birchington. Proposals will be judged and permitted only in accordance with a development brief and masterplan for the whole site including provision within the site of:

1) a new link road to serve the development and extending from Minnis Road and the A28,

2) a minimum of 11 ha of open space in accordance with the standards set out in Table 7,

3) a fully serviced site of 2.05 ha (to be provided at the cost of the developer) for a two-form entry primary school,

4) small scale convenience retail provision required to accessibly serve day to day needs of the development.

Phasing of development will be in accordance with Policy H01(1). The access road and serviced school site shall be programmed for delivery as agreed by the county council as highway and education authority respectively.

Masterplanning will be informed by and address:

1) the need to clearly demonstrate how the SPA mitigation strategy as set out in Policy SP25 is being met and how it will ensure that development does not increase recreational pressure on designated sites,

2) a wintering and breeding bird survey to assess impact on bird populations within the district and the need to mitigate/compensate,

3) pre-design archaeological evaluation,

4) liaison with service providers to investigate the need to upgrade the capacity of any utility services and infrastructure including gas supply,

5) a statement of social impacts arising from the development and how any increased demand on community facilities will be addressed,

6) the need to preserve the listed buildings on the site and respect the setting of Quex Park,

7) The need for disposition of development and landscaping to enable a soft edge between the site and open countryside.

A minimum of 30% of all dwellings will be affordable homes in accordance with Policy SP19. The design brief should feature and reflect investigation of the need to incorporate an element of housing to meet the needs of particular groups including specifically sheltered and extra care homes. The proportion of houses as opposed to flats should exceed that in policy SP18 as much as possible.

Proposals will be accompanied by a Transport Assessment informing the masterplan including assessment of impact on the A28, including at its junction with Park Lane, and of impact on the junction of Manston Road, Park Lane and Acol Hill and demonstrating measures to promote multi-modal access, including footway and cycleway connections and an extended bus service accessible to the residential development. Development will be expected to provide an appropriate contribution to off-site highway improvements including for Birchington Square/Park Lane.

 

Policy SP15 - Strategic Housing Site at Westgate-on-Sea

Land to the east and west of Minster Road, Westgate is allocated for up to 1,000 new dwellings at a maximum density of 35 dwellings per hectare net. Phasing of development will be in accordance with Policy H01(1). Proposals will be judged and permitted only in accordance with a development brief and masterplan for the whole site including provision within the site of:

1) a minimum of 11.1 ha of open space in accordance with the standards set out in Table 7,

2) provision for small scale convenience retail provision required to accessibly serve day to day needs of the development,

3) a fully serviced area of 2.05 ha (to be provided at the cost of the developer) to accommodate a new two- form entry primary school.

Development will be expected to provide an appropriate contribution to off-site highway improvements.

A minimum of 30% of all dwellings will be affordable homes in accordance with Policy SP19. The design brief should feature and reflect investigation of the need to incorporate an element of housing to meet the needs of particular groups including specifically sheltered and extra care homes. The proportion of houses as opposed to flats should exceed that in policy SP18 as much as possible.

Masterplanning will be informed by and address

1) a transport assessment (including modelling of junctions of the A28 with Minster Rd, Briary Close and Garlinge High Street, the junction of Minster Rd with Shottendane Rd the junction of Brooke Avenue with Maynard Avenue), and incorporate:

2) an archaeological evaluation,

3) the need to safeguard the setting of scheduled ancient monuments and the listed Dent de Lion Gateway,

4) the need to clearly demonstrate how the SPA mitigation strategy as set out in Policy SP25 is being met and how it will ensure that development does not increase recreational pressure on designated sites,

5) a wintering and breeding bird survey to assess impact on bird populations within the district and the need to mitigate/compensate,

6) liaison with service providers to investigate the need to upgrade the capacity of any utility services and infrastructure including gas supply,

7) a statement of social impacts arising from the development and how any increased demand on community facilities will be addressed,

8) appropriate arrangements for surface water management in line with Margate Surface Water Management Plan,

9) the need for disposition of development and landscaping to take account of public rights of way and enable a soft edge between the site and open countryside.

 

Policy SP16 Westwood Strategic Housing

Land is allocated for up to 1,450 new dwellings at a maximum density of 40 dwellings per hectare net at Westwood. This allocation adjoins land already subject to planning permission for 1,020 dwellings at the junction of Nash Lane/Haine Road. Proposals will be judged and permitted only in accordance with a development brief and masterplan for the whole site integrating with development at the adjoining site. The masterplan shall incorporate:

1)    highway improvements including widening of Nash Road and links to Nash Road and Manston Road,

2)    a minimum of 16.63 ha of open space in accordance with the standards set out in Table 7,

3)    small scale convenience retail provision required to accessibly serve day to day needs of the development.

Phasing of development will be in accordance with Policy H01(1).  The access road shall be programmed for delivery as required by the county council as highway authority.

Masterplanning will be informed by and address:

1)    pre-design archaeological assessment,

2)    the need to preserve heritage farm buildings on the site,

3)    the need to clearly demonstrate how the SPA mitigation strategy as set out in Policy SP25 is being met and how it will ensure that development does not increase recreational pressure on designated sites,

4)    a wintering and breeding bird survey to assess impact on bird populations within the district and the need to mitigate/compensate,

5)    liaison with service providers to investigate the need to upgrade the capacity of any utility services and infrastructure,

6)    a statement of social impacts arising from the development and how any increased demand on community facilities will be addressed,

7)    appropriate arrangements for surface water management in line with Margate Surface Water Management Plan.

A minimum of 30% of all dwellings will be affordable homes in accordance with Policy SP19. The design brief should feature and reflect investigation of the need to incorporate an element of housing to meet the needs of particular groups including specifically sheltered and extra care homes. The proportion of houses as opposed to flats should exceed that in policy SP18 as much as possible.

Proposals will be accompanied by a Transport Assessment informing the Masterplan including assessment of impact of development on the local road network and demonstrating measures to promote multi-modal access, including footway and cycleway connections and an extended bus service accessible to the residential development. Development will be expected to provide an appropriate contribution to off-site highway improvements including in respect of Westwood Relief Scheme.

Development will be expected to provide an appropriate contribution to provision, where required, of a new school off-site.

Disposition of development and landscaping will be expected to take account of the presence of the overhead electricity transmission lines, retain an undeveloped corridor as an extension of the open area of Green Wedge to the east of the site, and enable a soft edge between the site and open countryside.

 

Policy SP17 - Land fronting Nash and Haine Roads

Land fronting Nash and Haine Roads is allocated for residential development with a notional capacity of 1,020 new dwellings or such capacity as may be demonstrated appropriate in light of the need to provide a school on site and/or any subsequent masterplan reflecting a maximum notional density of 40 dwellings per hectare net. The proportion of houses as opposed to flats should exceed that in policy SP18 as much as possible. The development will incorporate an element of affordable housing in line with policy SP19.

Development shall be permitted only in accordance with an agreed masterplan for the whole site and shall:

1)    Provide for any highway improvements identified as necessary in a traffic assessment and the development masterplan. Individual phases of development will be required to make provision pro-rata towards such improvements,

2)    as required provide a fully serviced area of 2.05 ha (to be provided at the cost of the developer) for a new two form entry school as an integral part of the development,

3)    incorporate and provide for connections and improvements to footpath and cycle networks facilitating walking, cycling and public transport to, from and within the site, including provision of or contribution to improvements to public transport services,

4)    reserve a minimum of 2 ha to enable provision of a medical centre and provide a community assembly facility,

5)    reserve and provide a minimum of 1.75 ha as local open space (including an equipped play area and casual/informal play space) together with an area of usable amenity space as an integral part of the design of the development. Where feasible the area of local open space should be larger than the minimum indicated above having regard to the standards set out in Table 7,

6)    incorporate landscaped buffer zones adjacent to any new road infrastructure and along the boundaries to adjacent to open farmland,

7)    provide and maintain appropriate equipment for continuous monitoring of local air quality to inform the Council’s ongoing air quality review and assessment programme.

Applications for successive phases of development will have regard to the need to integrate as far as feasible with any approved masterplans relating to neigbouring areas addressed in this policy and with Westwood Relief Scheme.

 

 

Type and Size of Dwellings

3.18 The Strategic Housing Market Assessment (SHMA) identified as a critical challenge tackling the impact of an ageing population, and forecast loss of younger age groups with the resultant potential loss of working age population.

3.19 Subsequent economic and population forecasts based on the economic aspirations and housing provisions in this Local Plan also predict for Thanet an increase in the ageing population (especially those above retirement age). However, they do also predict that the Plan’s strategy will see an increase in younger age groups.

3.20 Both the SHMA and the subsequent forecasts referred to above show that single person households are expected to increase in number. The SHMA notes however that there is a greater supply of smaller units than of family homes and houses, and that this demographic trend should not dictate policy. Indeed it notes that in aiming to deliver substantive regeneration and economic strategies the housing role in turning round economic performance is both to provide appropriate and attractive housing for higher earners and facilitate retention of local young families.

3.21 The SHMA notes that the housing stock is characterised by a combination of dense provision, overprovision of smaller flats and flatted buildings, and a shortage of larger homes of three bedrooms and more. It states that it is important that future development policy prioritises a rebalancing of stock to incentivise the provision of family homes and control the expansion of "flatting" of larger homes, while at the same time recognising solid demand for smaller homes including from young single people and increasing numbers of older single people.

3.22 In assessing housing needs the SHMA considers information about aspirations, economic development plans for the sub-region, opportunities to attract mature working households that new rail links will bring and priority need for affordable housing. It recommends broad proportions of the sizes and types of market and affordable homes that should be provided. This is shown in tables 4 and 5.

3.23 In exercising policy SP18, the Council will have regard to the relevant conclusions of the Strategic Housing Market Assessment or any bona fide evidence serving to refresh or update it.

Table 4 Market homes (houses includes bungalows) (from SHMA table 12.22)

 

 

 

 

 

Table 4 - Market Homes

Household

type

Singles

Couples with no children/
singles /needing support

Couples

with children

Couples

with children

Couples

with children

All

Dwelling

type

1 bed flats

2 bed flats

2 bed houses

3 bed houses

4 + bed houses

Percentage

20%

10%

25%

35%

10%

100%

 

Table 5 Affordable homes (houses includes bungalows) (from SHMA table 12.14)

Table 5 - Affordable Homes

Household

type

Singles

Couples with no children /
singles /needing support

Couples

with children

Couples

with children

Couples

with children

All

Dwelling

type

1 bed flats

2 bed flats

2 bed houses

3 bed houses

4 + bed houses

Percentage

27.2%

12.5%

15%

34.1%

11.3%

100%

 

3.24 Previous dwelling completions in Thanet have included a large share of flatted accommodation. Consequently, in line with the SHMA recommendations it is important to increase the proportion of houses in the overall stock. Accordingly proposals will be expected to deliver at least the proportion of houses (as opposed to flats) in line with Policy SP18. It is recognised that in some instances there may be reasons such as configuration of buildings contributing to townscape quality why only flatted accommodation will be feasible. Schemes proposing a higher proportion of flats will need to be accompanied by a supporting justification.

Policy SP18 - Type and Size of Dwellings

Proposals for housing development will be expected to address the SHMA recommendations regarding the make-up of market and affordable housing types and sizes needed to meet requirements.

The Council will encourage proposals incorporating a higher proportion of houses as opposed to flats than recommended in the SHMA. Proposals for developments incorporating a higher proportion of flats than recommended in the SHMA will be expected to include site specific justification for the proportion and mix proposed.

Proposals to revert or convert properties currently used as flats to use as single family or single household accommodation will be permitted where a satisfactory standard of accommodation can be provided.

Residential development proposals involving the net loss of dwelling houses suited to modern living requirements will not be permitted, unless the proposal complies with Policy H9 (Houses in Multiple Occupation).

In the event of conflict between this policy and the Cliftonville DPD the latter shall prevail.

Providing Affordable Homes

3.25 Affordable housing includes social rented, affordable rented and intermediate housing, provided for households whose needs cannot be met by the market. The Strategic Housing Market Assessment's (SHMA) analysis is that tackling the backlog of need is an enormous task.

3.26 Through its functions as housing and planning authority the Council will aim to maximise the number of decent affordable homes that can viably be delivered alongside market homes in order to meet need. Negotiating elements of affordable housing in new schemes will contribute valuably to meeting local need.

3.27 Reflecting economic viability considerations in general the Council will negotiate for an element of 30% affordable housing in any residential development.

3.28 In applying the following policy, site specific considerations will be taken into account in relation to the element of affordable housing that will be expected. The presumption is that the affordable element will be delivered on the application site, unless robust justification exists for provision on an alternative site in the developer's ownership and control, or for a financial contribution in lieu of on-site provision which will help to deliver strategic housing objectives. It is accepted that on sites comprising a total of 15 dwellings or less, a financial contribution may be a more practical means of securing an element of affordable housing. The formula for calculating contributions will be featured in the Planning Obligations and Developer Contributions Supplementary Planning Document.

3.29 Developers will be required to demonstrate how any affordable housing will be made available to households unable to obtain adequate housing through the private market and will be expected to engage with registered providers. (The Council can provide a list of provider partners). This may be secured by entering into a planning agreement. The developer will be required to demonstrate that enjoyment of the affordable housing as such can be guaranteed for successive as well as initial occupiers for the foreseeable future. However, eligibility of owners to acquire/staircase to full ownership is acknowledged as an exception.

3.30 In light of the SHMA recommendations, the Council will seek to achieve and monitor delivery of, a target that 70% of affordable homes should be focused on social rented housing and 30% focused on intermediate housing. This target will remain subject to review in light of any bona fide evidence serving to refresh or update the SHMA.

 

Policy SP19 - Affordable Housing

Residential development schemes will be expected to include an element of affordable housing of 30%.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

4 - Environment Strategy

Protecting the Countryside

4.1 The National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) states that local plans should take account of the roles and character of different areas, promoting the vitality of our main urban areas and recognising the intrinsic character and beauty of the countryside.

4.2 Thanet’s open countryside is particularly vulnerable to development because of its limited extent, the openness and flatness of the rural landscape and the proximity of the towns. Thanet’s countryside provides important landscapes that contribute to its sense of place, as well as making Thanet an attractive place that people want to come to. Much of the countryside is classified as ‘best and most versatile agricultural land’. The countryside also supports a variety of habitats and species, particularly a number of important species of farmland birds which have declined in numbers over the last few decades.

4.3 There is a presumption against development in the countryside as the sites allocated in this plan meet the development needs of the district. The Council has assessed all of the sites put forward, and some have been allocated in the countryside where this has been considered appropriate to meet the needs of sustainable development. In addition it is proposed to rectify a minor discrepancy in the alignment of the confines as identified in the Thanet Local Plan 2006 to include a small area of private garden land adjoining 92 Park Road, Birchington.

4.4 The Council considers that it is essential to protect the countryside through planning policy in view of its vulnerability to sporadic forms of development and will locate all but essentially rural development in the Thanet towns. The only exception to this will be proposals for development that meet the criteria set out in paragraph 55 of the NPPF:

Such a design should:

The following policy seeks to achieve the objective of safeguarding the geological and scenic value of the coast and countryside.

Policy SP20 – Development in the Countryside

Development in the countryside outside of the urban and village confines, as identified in the Thanet Local Plan 2006, and not otherwise allocated for development, will not be permitted unless there is a need for the development that overrides the need to protect the countryside and any adverse environmental effects can be avoided or fully mitigated.

Green Wedges

4.5 The coastal towns of Thanet are separated by three particularly important areas of open countryside which are known as the Green Wedges indicated on Map 12.

Map 12 - Green Wedges

© Crown copyright and database rights 2014 Ordnance Survey 100018261
 
 Description: Green Wedge map

4.6 The Green Wedges are significant in shaping the character of Thanet which has historically been a ‘horseshoe’ of built development wrapping around the coast. The Green Wedges provide a clear visual break when passing between the towns, giving a recognised structure and identity to Thanet's settlements. The Green Wedges are distinct from other types of open space as they provide a continuous link between the open countryside and land which penetrates into the urban areas.

4.7 The three Green Wedges differ in size and character. The largest is the one that separates Margate and Broadstairs. Substantial areas of this Green Wedge consist of high quality agricultural land in large open fields without fences or hedgerows. Other parts have isolated belts of woodland. The other two Green Wedges which separate Birchington and Westgate, and Broadstairs and Ramsgate are considerably smaller but perform a very significant function and, due to their limited extent are also potentially more vulnerable to development pressures.

4.8 There is very limited built development within the Green Wedges. The areas have level or gently undulating landform and generally sparse vegetation. The public perception of space, openness and separation is largely gained from roads and footpaths that run through or alongside the Green Wedges in undeveloped frontages. These factors allow many extensive and uninterrupted views across open countryside, enabling people to find the recreational, scenic or amenity resources they require without having to travel long distances. This is important as it adds to the quality of life and well-being perceived by people in the community.

4.9 The aesthetics of the Green Wedges are varied, and they are not always accessible to the public. There is an opportunity to enhance the Green Wedges by creating and enhancing wildlife habitats, for example to encourage farmland birds, and to make the areas more accessible, potentially for recreation use. This may require changing farming activities.

4.10 The principal functions of and stated policy aims for Thanet’s Green Wedges are:

4.11 Local Plan policies have historically been used to prevent urban sprawl, maintain the separation of the Thanet towns and prevent their coalescence, preserving their unique identities. The Green Wedge policy has been consistently and strongly supported at appeals. Inspectors’ comments in appeal decisions, and the Inspector’s Report to the Thanet Local Plan Inquiry, highlight the significance of the open countryside between the Thanet Towns, in providing visual relief in a highly urbanised area.

4.12 Some areas of the Green Wedges are vulnerable to development pressures, and some sites within them have been suggested as housing allocations. The Council has assessed the sites put forward in the Green Wedges and found that the allocation of some sites proposed in the Green Wedges would cause less harm than others. However, although allowing some small scale development may not significantly diminish the Green Wedge, the cumulative impact of several small scale developments could be of detriment to the Green Wedges and cause new development pressures where there are currently none. It could also set a precedent of releasing Green Wedge sites and result in further development within the Green Wedges which would diminish their functions.

4.13 The Council considers the Green Wedges still perform a highly significant function which overrides the need for development, and should continue to be protected through planning policy and meet the strategic objective of retaining the separation between Thanet's towns and villages with the following policy.

Policy SP21 - Safeguarding the Identity of Thanet’s Settlements

Within the Green Wedges new development (including changes of use) will not be permitted unless it can be demonstrated that the development is:

1) not detrimental or contrary to the stated aims of the policy; or

2) essential for the proposed development to be located within the Green Wedges.

Open sports and recreational uses will be permitted subject to there being no overriding conflict with other policies, the wider objectives of this plan and the stated aims of this policy.

Proposals for development that include measures that will create or enhance wildlife habitats and biodiversity within the Green Wedges, or will improve the quality of the green wedges by providing high quality public amenity space will be supported.

Views and Landscapes

4.14 The National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) states that the planning system should contribute to and enhance the natural and local environment by protecting and enhancing valued landscapes.

4.15 Thanet has historically been recognised for its distinctive wide, simple and unrestricted views and dramatic chalk cliffs along parts of its coastline.

4.16 Thanet has a distinct landscape area defined by the former limits of the island that was cut off from the mainland by the Wantsum Channel until it silted up around 1000 years ago, along with post 1801 settlements and irregular fields bounded by roads, tracks and paths. The Wantsum has a history of reclamation and usage stretching back to at least the 12th and 13th centuries in connection with the considerable ecclesiastical estates in the region.

4.17 The contribution Thanet’s landscapes make to Thanet’s sense of place and island characteristics is very strong, as well as providing economic benefits in making the district an attractive place that people want to come to. Tourism and recreation uses compatible with Thanet’s historic landscapes would be encouraged. Development would be expected to respect the diverse landscape characteristics of the countryside and coast.

4.18 The character of the landscape within Thanet's countryside is varied, ranging from the distinctive sweep of Pegwell Bay, the flood plains of the River Stour and former Wantsum Channel, the open slopes of the former Wantsum Channel North Shore, the level to undulating Central Chalk Plateau, the wooded parkland at Quex and the urban coast. There have been a number of surveys and assessments which identify these landscapes - details of these can be found in the Natural Environment Topic Paper. Developers may be required to submit a Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment with planning applications likely to have a significant impact on the landscape. The Landscape Institute provides guidance on carrying out such an assessment.

Pegwell Bay

4.19 Pegwell Bay is an extensive area of mixed coastal habitats, including mudflats, saltmarsh and coastal scrub. These habitats form an open and relatively unspoilt landscape, with a distinctive character. The area possesses a sense of remoteness and wildness despite the relative proximity of development. Among its most important features in the area is the unique sweep of chalk cliffs viewed across Pegwell Bay from the south. This landscape creates large open skies.

The Former Wantsum Channel

4.20 This area includes the flood plain of the River Stour, and historically represents the former sea channel, the Wantsum Channel, which previously separated the Isle of Thanet from mainland Kent and which silted up over several centuries. The area is characterised by a vast, flat, open landscape defined by the presence of an ancient field system, defined by an extensive ditch and dyke system, the sea walls and isolated groups of trees. These elements provide important visual evidence of the physical evolution of the Wantsum Channel and, like other marsh areas in Kent, produce huge open skies.

The Former Wantsum North Shore

4.21 This area largely comprises the distinctive and often quite steep hill slopes leading down from the Central Chalk Plateau to the former Wantsum Channel. The landscape is very open with few features and the former shoreline is more distinct in some places than in others, with the variation in the contour pattern. From the upper slopes it affords extensive views across the whole of the former Wantsum Channel to the slopes on the opposite banks and in many places to the sea. The former shoreline is more distinct in some places than in others, with the variation in the contour pattern. However, it also provides the unique setting of the former channel side villages of Minster, Monkton, Sarre and St Nicholas, and the smaller, originally farm based, settlements of Shuart, Gore Street and Potten Street. These elements provide important visual evidence of the growth of human settlement, agriculture and commerce in the area.

4.22 The openness of this landscape provides wide and long views of the former Wantsum Channel area and Pegwell Bay. The area also possesses a large number of archaeological sites (including scheduled ancient monuments); numerous listed buildings (including Minster Abbey, the churches at Minster, Monkton and St Nicholas, and Sarre Mill); and the historical landing sites of St Augustine and the Saxons, Hengist and Horsa.

The Central Chalk Plateau

4.23 The central part of the district is characterised by a generally flat or gently undulating landscape, with extensive, unenclosed fields under intensive arable cultivation. This open landscape is fragmented by the location of large scale developments such as the airport, Manston Business Park and a sporadic settlement pattern to the north of the airport. The character of this area is also defined by the proximity of the edges of the urban areas.

Quex Park

4.24 The Park is unique within the Thanet context, comprising a formal and extensive wooded parkland and amenity landscape within an otherwise open intensively farmed landscape. It possesses a formal landscape structure and gardens that act as an effective setting to Quex House. The parkland is intensively cultivated between the tree belts, with limited grazing pasture remaining. Two important historic features of the Park are the Waterloo Tower and a round castellated brick tower to the north of the main House.

The Urban Coast

4.25 The urban areas of Thanet form an almost continuous conurbation along the coast between Pegwell Village and Minnis Bay. With the exception of the Green Wedges, this area is heavily urbanised. The coastal strip is characterised by the presence of traditional seaside architecture, active harbour areas and beaches and some extensive public open clifftop areas. The pattern of bays and headlands provides long sweeping and panoramic views of the coast, which are often complimented by a positive relationship with adjacent built development.

The following policy aims to safeguard and enhance the open and historic characteristics of Thanet's countryside and landscapes.

Policy SP22 – Protection and Enhancement of Thanet’s Historic Landscapes

Development proposals should demonstrate that their location, scale, design and materials will protect, conserve and, where possible, enhance:

1)    Thanet’s local distinctiveness including historical, biodiversity and cultural character,

2)    gaps between Thanet’s towns and villages,

3)    visually sensitive skylines and seascapes,

Within the landscape character areas identified, the following policy principles will be applied:

1)    At Pegwell Bay priority will be given to the conservation and enhancement of the natural beauty of the landscape over other planning considerations;

2)    In the former Wantsum Channel area, new development will not normally be permitted;

3)    In the Wantsum Channel North Shore Area, development will only be permitted that would provide opportunities for enhancement and would not damage the setting of the Wantsum Channel, and long views of Pegwell Bay, the Wantsum Channel, the adjacent marshes and the sea;

4)    On the Central Chalk Plateau, a number of sites are identified for various development purposes. Where development is permitted by other policies in this plan, particular care should be taken to avoid skyline intrusion and the loss or interruption of long views of the coast and the sea and proposals should demonstrate how the development will take advantage of and engage with these views;

5)    At Quex Park, new development proposals should respect the historic character of the parkland and gardens; and

6)    At the Urban Coast, development that does not respect the traditional seafront architecture of the area, maintain existing open spaces and long sweeping views of the coastline will not be permitted.

Development proposals that conflict with the above principles will only be permitted where it can be demonstrated that they are essential for the economic or social well-being of the area or for reasons where the need for the development outweighs the detriment to the landscape. The developer may be required to submit a Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment with any development proposals likely to have a significant landscape impact.

 

Green Infrastructure Network

4.26 The National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) states that local plans should plan positively for the creation, protection, enhancement and management of networks of biodiversity and green infrastructure. It states that local ecological networks should be identified and these should include the hierarchy of international, national and locally designated sites of importance for biodiversity, wildlife corridors, stepping stones that connect them, and areas identified by local partnerships for habitat restoration or creation.

4.27 Planning policies should promote the preservation, restoration and re-creation of priority habitats, ecological networks and the protection and recovery of priority species.

4.28 The NPPF also states that international, national and locally designated nature conservation sites should be protected, with appropriate weight given to the importance of their designation.

4.29 The NPPF states that existing open space, sports and recreational buildings and land (including playing fields) should not be built on unless it can be demonstrated that the land is surplus to requirements or if it would be replaced by equivalent or improved provision. Planning policies should also protect and enhance public rights of way and access.

4.30 Thanet boasts a wealth of natural features including internationally and nationally designated sites and associated species, a magnificent coastline, chalk cliffs, geological features and areas of open countryside with distinctive landscapes and views. It is important that these are maintained and enhanced, and better linked to provide a comprehensive green infrastructure network.

4.31 Natural England defines Green Infrastructure (GI) as:

‘….. a strategically planned and delivered network comprising the broadest range of high quality green spaces and other environmental features. It should be designed and managed as a multifunctional resource capable of delivering those ecological services and quality of life benefits required by the communities it serves and needed to underpin sustainability. Its design and management should also respect and enhance the character and distinctiveness of an area with regard to habitats and landscape types.

Green infrastructure includes established green spaces and new sites and should thread through and surround the built environment and connect the urban area to its wider rural hinterland. Consequently it needs to be delivered at all spatial scales from sub-regional to local neighbourhood levels, accommodating both accessible natural green spaces within local communities and often much larger sites in the urban fringe and wider countryside.’

4.32 A working group of the East Kent councils has established an East Kent GI typology in order to maintain a consistent approach towards green infrastructure. This encompasses the following types:

Thanet's existing green infrastructure is shown on Map 13.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Map 13 - Thanet's Existing Green Infrastructure

4.33 There are various green infrastructure projects being progressed by the Council and other organisations, and also a number of community projects. These include Dane Valley Woods, West Undercliff Village Green, Friends of Mocketts Wood, Montefiore Woodland and the Windmill Community Allotments. Some major planning applications have included provision for new green infrastructure including Hereson School the Westwood Housing site adjacent to Westwood Cross (land at Nash Road/Haine Road) and the Minster Housing site at Molineux Road. Methods of providing and enhancing green infrastructure include:

4.34 The Council seeks to continue increasing and enhancing Thanet's green infrastructure network, and encourages new community green infrastructure projects.

This policy aims to deliver the strategic objectives by protecting, maintaining and enhancing biodiversity and the natural environment and creating a coherent network of green infrastructure.

Policy SP23 – Green Infrastructure

Thanet’s green infrastructure network is an integral part of the design of all major development. Opportunities to improve Thanet’s green infrastructure network by protecting and enhancing existing green infrastructure assets and the connections between them, should be included early in the design process for major developments.

Development should make a positive contribution to Thanet's green infrastructure network by:

Investment and developer contributions should be directed to improve and expand green infrastructure and provide connecting links where opportunities exist.

 

Biodiversity Enhancements

4.35 Biodiversity Opportunity Areas (BOAs) have been identified to facilitate the delivery of landscape scale habitat recreation and restoration, and to connect designated sites and priority or Biodiversity Action Plan habitats. Thanet has two BOAs:

The following policy aims to meet the strategic objective of protecting, maintaining and enhancing biodiversity.

Policy SP24 – Biodiversity Enhancements

Biodiversity Opportunity Areas and the Green Wedges are protected from inappropriate development, and proposals which would provide enhancements and contribute to a high quality biodiverse environment will be supported.

 

National and International Designations

Protection of the European Sites, Sites of Special Scientific Interest and National Nature Reserve

4.36 Designated sites of international, national and local value and extensive areas of wetland and farmland habitat harbour both protected and priority species. The diagram below shows the hierarchy of these designations from international, national to local importance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Diagram 1 – Hierarchy of National and International Designations 

4.37 The European sites (Special Protection Area, Special Area of Conservation and RAMSAR) are defined under European laws and comprise a network of sites across Europe designated for their important habitat and/or birds. Most of the Thanet coastline is designated and is important for its intertidal chalk, caves, species (such as blue mussel beds and piddocks), dunes and mudflats, and certain migratory and breeding bird species.

4.38 The nationally designated sites (Sites of Special Scientific Interest and National Nature Reserve), also cover the coastline, and have similar features to the international sites, including over 30 nationally rare species of terrestrial and marine plants, 19 nationally rare and 149 nationally scarce invertebrate species and roost sites for migrating and wintering birds.

4.39 The Thanet Coast is also a designated Marine Conservation Zone.

4.40 The Thanet Coast Project was established in 2001 and is tasked with much of the delivery of the North East Kent Marine Protected Area (NEKMPA) Action Plan and therefore delivery of the majority of the objectives of the Thanet Cliffs and Shore Biodiversity Opportunity Area (BOA) within Thanet. The main aims of the project are to :-

4.41 The Thanet Project has been very successful in the last nine years with the following activities and projects set up to deliver these objectives:-

4.42 Recreational pressure at the European sites, particularly the SPA, has given cause for concern from Natural England and the Kent Wildlife Trust regarding the impact of disturbance to over-wintering birds. There is further concern regarding the impact of increased recreational pressure as a result of population increases.

4.43 Evidence suggests that new housing development in Thanet has the potential to increase the recreational impacts on the SPA resulting from the increase in population. This may have an adverse impact on the species for which the SPA has been designated. The actual level of impact from individual developments may not be significant, however the in-combination effect of all housing developments proposed in the district cannot rule out a significant impact.

4.44 A mitigation strategy is being prepared to ensure that mitigation measures are put in place to enable growth and development without compromising the integrity of the European Sites. The mitigation strategy will be reviewed and updated regularly.

The following policy seeks to protect, maintain and enhance biodiversity and the natural environment where it is designated for its international and national importance.

Policy SP25 – Protection of the European Sites, Sites of Special Scientific Interest and National Nature Reserve

Development that would have a detrimental impact on the European Sites, Sites of Special Scientific Interest or National Nature Reserve will not be permitted.

Planning permission may only be granted when it can be demonstrated that any harm to internationally and nationally designated sites resulting from that development will be suitably mitigated.

Proposals for residential development must include an assessment of significant effects and measures to mitigate against the effects of potential increased recreational pressure on protected sites.

Proposals for major residential developments must include provision of open space suitable for dog walking and general recreation, in accordance with policy SP23.

In developing these measures, regard must be had to the SPA Mitigation Strategy which requires a financial contribution towards wardening, and applicants must demonstrate clearly how they are meeting the strategy and how they will ensure that development will mitigate against any increase recreational pressure on designated sites.

 

Protection of Open Space

4.45 Thanet's urban areas are interspersed with a variety of areas of open space. These include: parks, informal recreation green space, natural and semi natural green space, amenity green space, outdoor sports facilities, play areas, cemeteries and allotments. These form part of Thanet’s green infrastructure network and are shown on Map 13.

4.46 The National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) states that existing open space, sports and recreational buildings and land (including playing fields) should not be built on unless it can be demonstrated that they are surplus to requirements, the loss would be replaced by equivalent or better provision or the development is for alternative sports and recreation provision. The NPPF also states that planning policies should protect and enhance public rights of way (PROW) and access. Kent County Councils Countryside and Coastal Access Improvement Plan identifies the need for planning policies to protect or enhance PROW.

4.47 Open space is a scarce commodity within Thanet’s urban areas. Once such areas are lost to development, it is very difficult to provide satisfactory replacements within the immediate vicinity. Open spaces can provide for a wide variety of activities from organised sport to simple relaxation and opportunities for walking. Open space and amenity areas are vital for people's health and quality of life.

4.48 Local Green Spaces can be designated by communities through the local or neighbourhood planning processes. As set out in the NPPF, once designated, a local green space will be afforded the same protection as Green Belts and new development will not be permitted other than in very special circumstances. The NPPF sets out the circumstances under which development may be permitted. Green spaces can only be designated where all of the following apply:

4.49 The following policies meet the objectives of promoting physical and mental well-being, safeguarding and enhancing the geological and scenic value of the coast and countryside, retaining the separation between Thanets towns and villages and enhancing biodiversity and the natural environment.

 

Policy SP26 – Protection of Open Space

Built development or change of use will not be permitted on areas of open space identified as part of Thanet’s green infrastructure network (including Public Rights of Way) unless:

1) It is for an open recreation or tourism uses and is of appropriate scale and design for its setting. Any related built development should be kept to the minimum necessary to support the open use, and be sensitively located.

2) There is an overriding need for development that outweighs the need to protect open space and cannot be located elsewhere, in which case provision of alternative open space of an equivalent size must be made elsewhere.

New development that is permitted by virtue of this policy should make a positive contribution to the area in terms of siting, design, scale and use of materials.

Built development in any areas designated as Local Green Spaces will only be permitted if the proposal meets the exception criteria set out in the National Planning Policy Framework.

 

Provision of accessible natural and semi-natural green space

4.50 The provision of larger areas of open space will be delivered most appropriately through strategic allocations and should be considered integral to the masterplanning of development proposals. The Open Space Audit 2005 identified an under provision of natural and semi natural green space of 0.95ha per 1000 population. In order to achieve the recommended 2ha of open space per 1000 population an additional provision of 34ha is needed. The audit found the provision of parks, gardens and recreation grounds to be sufficient at the time of the audit, at 1.06ha per 1000 population. In order to maintain this standard a further 18ha per 1000 population will be required. These standards are set out in Table 7.

4.51 Allotment sites are a statutory requirement for the Council but are usually managed by town or parish councils. A list of allotments, both under Council or local management, is provided at Appendix C. Allotments serve not only local residents by offering them a chance to grow their own fruit and vegetables but also by offering them physical activities, a healthy diet, and general well being. The overall benefits of allotments include:

4.52 The provision of allotments is considered a service best provided at local level, therefore the council will no longer offer allotment sites to applicants whose address is outside the Margate and Westgate area. Applicants applying from Ramsgate, Broadstairs, Birchington or the Thanet villages will be advised to contact their respective Parish or Town Council unless there are extenuating circumstances.

4.53 The change in management of allotments will be reflected in the waiting lists for the sites. Parish and Town councils are consulted on all planning applications received by the Council.

4.54 The audit found the provision of allotments to be sufficient at the time of the audit, at 0.19ha per 1000 population.

4.55 In order to maintain this standard a further 18ha will be required. These standards are set out in Table 7.

The following policy seeks to ensure the recommended provision of natural and semi natural green space, parks, gardens and recreation grounds is provided for and will contribute to Thanet's green infrastructure network.

Policy SP27 – Provision of Accessible Natural and Semi Natural Green Space, Parks, Gardens and Recreation Grounds

The Council will require suitably and conveniently located areas of usable amenity space, adequate to accommodate the demands for passive recreation generated by residential development.

Sites of 50 dwellings or more will be required to provide natural and semi natural green space and local parks, formal gardens, allotments and recreation grounds to meet the standards set out in Table 7.

The Council will expect appropriate arrangements for maintenance and management, responsibility for which will be vested in a particular individual, or, subject to commuted payment to meet such costs, in the district, town or parish council. Such arrangements will be secured by entering into a planning agreement.

Any areas of accessible natural and semi natural green space, parks, gardens and recreation grounds created by virtue of this policy will be protected from development by policy SP26 – Protection of Open Spaces.

 

 


 

Quality Development

4.56 The National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) places high importance on good design stating that pursuing sustainable development involves seeking positive improvements in the quality of the built, natural and historic environment, as well as in people’s quality of life. Planning should seek to secure high quality design and a good standard of amenity for all existing and future occupants of land and buildings. Permission should be refused for development of poor design that fails to take the opportunity to improve the character and quality of an area.

4.57 Thanet’s towns, villages, coast and countryside enjoy a diverse and rich built heritage which contributes significantly to the Thanet’s unique sense of place and identity. There are 21 conservation areas and around 2,000 listed buildings (a large proportion of which are in the historic town centres) - the highest concentration of listed buildings for a local authority in the South East. However there are some areas in the district where the townscape quality is less attractive, with developments of mediocre and poor quality, and areas of neglect. The urban areas have been developed to a high density, with high numbers of flats – largely due to the availability of large properties formerly used as hotels which lend themselves to conversion to flats, and the subdivision of larger family homes. Some of the urban areas boast a rich architectural heritage including attractive Victorian terraces and Regency squares and large and attractive art deco properties along the coasts. Some suburbs and the rural villages are characterised by lower density development, with large, well-spaced properties and a number of tree lined streets.

4.58 Good design can help improve and enhance areas by ensuring high quality developments, and can help reduce the opportunities for crime and the fear of crime. The NPPF re-iterates and reinforces the role of Design Review in ensuring high standards of design. Design Review is an independent and impartial evaluation process in which a panel of experts on the built environment assess the design of a proposal. The projects that Design Review deals with are usually of public significance, and the process is designed to improve the quality of buildings and places for the benefit of the public.

4.59 Developers proposing projects of public significance (such as urban extensions or town centre mixed use developments) will be required to seek a Design Review by an independent design panel. This should be carried out at an early stage in the process. The South East Regional Design Panel can be contacted at Kent Architecture Centre www.architecturecentre.org. Developers proposing projects that are of national significance or that will have a profound impact on the regional and local environment will be required to seek a National Design Review with the CABE team at the Design Council,  www.designcouncil.org.uk.

This objective of this policy is to ensure that new development is built to the highest attainable quality.

 

 

Policy SP28 – Quality Development

New development will be of a high quality inclusive design. Developers will be required to seek an independent Design Review for development proposals on sites with a prominent visual impact, or which are of national significance.


 

Heritage

4.60 The National Planning Policy Statement (NPPF) states that local plans should set out 'a positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic environment'. It places emphasis on putting heritage assets to viable uses, the wider benefits that can be achieved by the conservation of the historic environment and the desirability of new development in making a positive contribution to local character and distinctiveness. It also includes criteria which would need to be fulfilled for a proposed development which would lead to substantial harm or loss of a heritage asset.

4.61 Thanet's historic and natural environment defines the character and setting of the district, and contributes significantly to residents' quality of life. It is important to maintain and enhance the historic and natural environment against the background of a successful, growing district.

4.62 The district can trace its origins to pre-historic activity with the remains of all periods from the Neolithic to Modern recorded within the area, consisting of both burial and settlement archaeology.

4.63 It is this rich heritage and the close proximity to the sea that gives the district its special character and distinctiveness, this is emphasised by the large number of highly graded designated heritage assets, often connected to the strong relationship with the sea either in the form of commerce, health or leisure.

4.64 Thanet can be described as a district with a diverse and vibrant character. The character of the coastal areas owes much to the juxtaposition of grand seafront developments and the smaller scale domestic 'vernacular' buildings associated with working harbours and holiday resorts.

4.65 The character of the rural areas owes much to the strong links with early Christianity and the ensuing development of medieval parishes centred around the church.

4.66 Some of the special qualities of Thanet's historic environment include:

4.67 A Heritage Strategy is being prepared for Thanet. It is proposed that the strategy will be developed alongside the Local Plan and we have started to develop an evidence base to support this strategy and the Local Plan. The evidence includes assessing the significance of heritage assets in the area, including their settings, and the contribution they make to their environment. It also involves assessing the potential of finding new sites of archaeological or historic interest.

4.68 The preservation of Thanet's heritage is considered to be an economic asset, and its maintenance and protection plays an important role in the district’s economy.

4.69 The Council's aim is to work with property owners and other stakeholders in the historic environment to both protect and enhance the historic environment and ensure its economic viability for future generations. The following policy sets out how it intends to achieve this.

Policy SP29 - Conservation and Enhancement of Thanet's Historic Environment

The Council will support, value and have regard to the significance of Heritage Assets by:

1) protecting the historic environment from inappropriate development,

2) encouraging new uses where they bring listed buildings back into use, encouraging their survival and maintenance without compromising the conservation of the building,

3) seeking the provision of appropriate research for all applications relating to the historic environment on key sites as identified through the Heritage Strategy,

4) facilitating the review of Conservation Areas and the opportunities for new designations,

5) recognising other local assets through Local Lists,

6) offering help, advice and information about the historic environment by providing guidance to stakeholders, producing new guidance leaflets, reviewing existing guidance leaflets and promoting events which make the historic environment accessible to all,

7) agreeing Article 4 Directions which will be introduced and reviewed as appropriate,

8) supporting development that is of high quality design and supports sustainable development.

All reviews and designations will be carried out in consultation with the public in order to bring a shared understanding of why asset and areas are being designated.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Climate Change

4.70 The National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) expects a pro-active approach against climate change and states that adapting to, and mitigating against, the effect of climate change are core planning principles. This can be achieved by planning for new development in locations and ways which reduce greenhouse gas emissions, actively support energy efficiency improvements to existing buildings and set any building sustainability standards in line with the Government’s zero carbon buildings policy.

4.71 The NPPF lists expectations to improve energy efficiency in new development in terms of decentralised energy and sustainable design, and ways of increasing the use and supply of renewable and low carbon energy. It stresses the importance of addressing longer term factors such as flood risk, coastal change, water supply and changes to biodiversity and landscape.

4.72 Climate change is a change in weather patterns caused by the increased levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere produced by the use of fossil fuels.

4.73 The effects of climate change are already being seen in Kent, and include:

4.74 The Government's Zero Carbon policy requires all new homes from 2016 to mitigate, through various measures, all the carbon emissions produced on-site as a result of the regulated energy use. This includes energy used to provide space heating and cooling, hot water and fixed lighting, as outlined in Part L1A of the Building Regulations. Provision can be made for offsetting though off-site 'Allowable Solutions' which minimise costs and unlock off-site abatement which can be more effective than on-site abatement. Allowable Solutions can be in the form of:

4.75 The Council has adopted the Climate Local Kent commitment for Thanet. Climate Local is a Local Government Association initiative to drive, inspire and support council action on a changing climate. The initiative supports councils’ efforts both to reduce carbon emissions and also to improve their resilience to the effects of our changing climate and extreme weather. The Climate Local Kent Commitment sets aims which include:

The following policy aims to ensure new development minimises the impacts of climate change through mitigation and adaptation measures, and reduce Thanet's carbon footprint.

Policy SP30 – Climate Change

New development must take account of:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5 - Community Strategy

Healthy and Inclusive Communities

5.1 The National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) acknowledges the link between planning and healthy communities and states that the planning system should support strategies to improve health and cultural well being, promote healthy communities and identify policies that will deliver the provision of health facilities. It encourages policies that will facilitate social interaction and healthy inclusive communities.

5.2 Health issues are addressed in this plan in the following policy areas:

The following policy sets out how the Plan will contribute towards a healthier community.

Policy SP31 – Healthy and Inclusive Communities

The Council will work with relevant organisations, communities and developers to promote, protect and improve the health of Thanet’s residents, and reduce health inequalities. Proposals will be supported that:

1) bring forward accessible community services and facilities, including new health facilities,

2) safeguard existing community services and facilities,

3) safeguard or provide open space, sport and recreation and enabling access to nature,

4) promote healthier options for transport including cycling and walking,

5) improve or increase access to a healthy food supply such as allotments, markets and farm shops,

6) create social interaction and safe environments through mixed uses and the design and layout of development,

7) create a healthy environment that regulates local climate.


 

Community and Utility Infrastructure

5.3 The National Planning Policy Framework requires local plans to make provision for infrastructure for transport, telecommunications, waste management, water supply, wastewater, flood risk and coastal change. It also requires the provision of infrastructure for health, security, community, cultural, gas, electricity, emergency services and fibre-optic cables.

5.4 It is important that there is sufficient community infrastructure to support new development. This includes provision of adult social services, education, health facilities, libraries, childcare and youth services.

5.5 Advanced high quality communications infrastructure is essential for sustainable economic growth. The development of high speed broadband technology and other communications networks also plays a vital role in enhancing the provision of local community facilities and services.

5.6 The Council is working with Kent County Council and other services providers to ensure sufficient infrastructure is provided for. An Infrastructure Delivery Plan is being prepared alongside the Local Plan to identify infrastructure requirements.

The following policies seek to achieve the objectives of accommodating the development needed whilst providing and improving access to community and utility infrastructure.

Policy SP32 – Community Infrastructure

Development will only be permitted when provision is made to ensure delivery of relevant and sufficient community and utility infrastructure. Where appropriate, development will be expected to contribute to the provision of new, improved, upgraded or replacement infrastructure and facilities.

Provision of Schools

Expansion of Primary and Secondary Schools

5.7 Kent County Council, as education authority, has identified from the population and growth forecasts set out in this plan that Thanet's primary and secondary schools will need to expand. The Council will work with KCC to identify and safeguard land to accommodate any required expansions.

Policy SP33 - Expansion of Primary and Secondary Schools

The Council will support the expansion of existing and development of new primary and secondary schools in Thanet to meet identified needs and will work with Kent County Council in identifying, allocating and safeguarding land as appropriate.

 

6 - Transport Strategy

Safe and Sustainable Travel

6.1 The National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) states that transport policies have an important role to play in facilitating sustainable development and in contributing to wider sustainability and health objectives. Key messages include that the transport system needs to be balanced in favour of sustainable transport modes, giving people real choice about how they travel. Local Plan policies are expected to aim for a balance of land uses to encourage people to minimise journey length for employment, shopping, leisure, education and other activities.

6.2 Transport is a critical factor to Thanet's aspirations for sustainable economic regeneration. Thanet’s citizens need to go to work, school, shops and to access other services as part of their daily lives. Goods need to be moved to support employment and economic growth. Thanet does not at present suffer significant levels of congestion, traffic noise, pollution and delays such as experienced in urban centres elsewhere in Kent. A high proportion of Thanet’s population has no access to a car. However this has potential to change and some traffic congestion already occurs at certain junctions at peak times. Thanet has an attractive environment and is a pleasant place to live and work. Its environment is also a potential asset in attracting investment. The intention is to maintain that situation while attracting and accommodating appropriate development in support of regeneration. Accordingly, key actions will be to manage mobility by putting in place an efficient and effective, sustainable transport system.

6.3 With an airport and a major port, Thanet has an international Gateway function important for economic development across the region. The introduction of high speed trains connecting Thanet with the High Speed 1 (HS1) service has reduced journey times from Ramsgate to London by over 30 minutes. Manston Business Park is a location of strategic importance. A surface access strategy and travel plan will be required alongside planned growth to promote sustainable travel, particularly by the workforce.

6.4 Kent County Council’s Transport Delivery Plan "Growth without Gridlock" identifies strategic transport projects to support Kent’s sustainable economic growth. It recognises the potential of Manston Airport to cater for increasing freight and passenger movements. It also acknowledges the need and potential for coastal areas to derive greater benefit from the High Speed 1 rail service including through potential increases to line speeds for domestic link services, and a new railway station. The HS1 services need to be integrated with the wider public transport network and meet the needs of people who elect to access them by car.

 

 

 

 

Map 14 - Thanet's Transport Infrastructure

© Crown copyright and database rights 2014 Ordnance Survey 100018261
 
 Description: Transport Chapter Map 1 Transport Map

 

6.5 Thanet’s services and most employment sites are clustered in and around the coastal centres and Westwood. These are close to Thanet's existing communities, including the deprived neighbourhoods, and highly accessible by public transport including the frequent “Loop" bus.

6.6 An efficient and convenient public transport system and direct walking and cycling routes need to be at the heart of the transport network to reduce the risk that growth may cause traffic congestion, noise and air pollution, or isolate disadvantaged communities.

6.7 Within the context of an established development pattern, the most significant change likely to generate demand for travel will result from new housing development. It is necessary, therefore, to consider the location of development in areas accessible to a range of services on foot and by public transport, preventing urban sprawl and improving local high streets and town centres. Methods such as providing showers and changing facilities in employment related development and locating cycle parking close to town centres/entrances will also help reduce the need to travel by car.

6.8 Thanet and Kent County Council are jointly preparing a Thanet Transport Strategy to help increase the efficiency and effectiveness of the transport system, achieve a shift to more sustainable travel patterns and modes and to identify the transport infrastructure and improvements required to support implementation of the Local Plan. The following sections address challenges identified in the draft Strategy.

Policy SP34 - Safe and Sustainable Travel

The Council will work with developers, transport service providers, and the local community to manage travel demand, by promoting and facilitating walking, cycling and use of public transport as safe and convenient means of transport. Development applications will be expected to take account of the need to promote safe and sustainable travel. New developments must provide safe and attractive cycling and walking opportunities to reduce the need to travel by car.

 

Accessible Locations

6.9 Guiding the location, scale and density of new development is an important way of reducing the need to travel, reducing travel distances, and making it safer for people to use alternatives to the car. Consistent policies directing location of travel generating uses will also guide infrastructure investment further supporting integration of transport and land use.

Policy SP35 - Accessible location

Development generating a significant number of trips will be expected to be located where a range of services are or will be conveniently accessible on foot, by cycle or public transport. The Council will seek to approve proposals to cluster or co-locate services at centres accessible to local communities by public transport and on foot.

Transport Infrastructure

6.10 The Transport Strategy aims to promote walking, cycling and use of public transport as well as improvements to the road network to facilitate sustainable choice and safe and convenient travel. Where the need for improvements arises wholly or largely from proposed development the developer will be expected to contribute towards required improvements as set out in the Transport Strategy and Infrastructure Delivery Plan.

6.11 While this Plan seeks to increase use of sustainable modes of transport, people will continue to make use of private cars and planned growth will increase travel demand. Traffic flows within Thanet are generally unrestricted. However, there are a number of locations where traffic flow issues need to be addressed. These are “Victoria” traffic lights Margate, Coffin House Corner Margate, Marine Terrace Margate, Dane Court Roundabout Broadstairs and the “Spitfire” junction, near Manston airport. The Council will seek to implement solutions to address identified capacity issues in the road network.

Policy SP36 - Transport Infrastructure

Development proposals will be assessed in terms of the type and level of travel demand likely to be generated. Development will be permitted only at such time as proper provision is made to ensure delivery of relevant transport infrastructure. Where appropriate, development will be expected to contribute to the provision, extension or improvement, of walking and cycling routes and facilities and to highway improvements.

Subject to individual assessments, schemes may be required to provide or contribute to:

·         Capacity improvements/connections to the cycle network

·         Provision of pedestrian links with public transport routes/interchanges

·         Improvements to passenger waiting facilities

·         Facilities for display of approach time information at bus stops along identified quality bus corridors

·         Improvement and expansion of public transport services

·         Improvements to the road network in line with schemes identified through the Transport Strategy.

Connectivity

6.12 Thanet’s location in the south east corner of England has previously been seen as a disincentive to investors, but now the transport infrastructure in place offers attractive business opportunities with an integrated transport hub, maximising on the potential of High Speed One from Ramsgate, the port and Manston Airport. Recent years have seen the completion of the A299 Thanet Way and its new connection to the now completed East Kent Access route. This road infrastructure gives direct connectivity between the ports of Dover and Ramsgate, Manston Airport and the rest of Britain’s strategic road network.

6.13 Introduction of the High Speed 1 (HS1) rail service and dualling of the principal East Kent Access route network into Thanet have improved perceptions of the district as a credible location for investment. Prospective investments in line speeds along the domestic link to HS1 will result in further significant reduction in journey times between Thanet and St Pancras.

Policy SP37 - Connectivity

The Council will continue to lobby for investments to secure further improvements to rail journey times for CTRL including domestic services between Ashford and Ramsgate.

Strategic Road Network

6.14 The Highways Agency has identified potential capacity issues at junctions on the Strategic Road Network at the M2 junction 7 (Brenley Corner) and at the A2/A256 junction. While these junctions are located some distance from Thanet, development in the district may add to cumulative impact upon them as a result of overall growth in the sub region. This reinforces the importance of promoting sustainable modes of travel, as a way of minimising the impact (as per Policy SP34).

Policy SP38 - Strategic Road Network

In conjunction with neighbouring districts the Council will prepare a joint assessment of planned development and the expected volume and direction of road traffic movement it would generate to understand its potential impact on these junctions and how this may, if appropriate, be mitigated.

New Rail Station

6.15 The introduction of faster trains on the Ramsgate to St Pancras route, utilising the High Speed rail link (HS1) means that Ramsgate is only 76 minutes from London for much of the day. As a result Thanet has the potential to become a more attractive location for people employed in London seeking to live in a more pleasant environment.

6.16 Kent County Council, through its Local Transport Plan 'Growth without Gridlock', and the South East Local Enterprise Partnership, through its Strategic Economic Plan support the provision of a new Parkway railway station to the west of Ramsgate close to Cliffsend village. In promoting delivery of the project Kent County Council has identified a preferred location west of Cliffsend.

6.17 Thanet District Council supports the principle of a new railway station at a suitable location along the rail-side area west of Ramsgate. The following policy safeguards land at the preferred location west of Cliffsend for the Parkway project including an area for car parking and a notional road access to East Kent Access road. In addition the Council will continue to investigate and press for improvements to the running times of trains between Thanet and Ashford with a view to reducing the journey time from the Parkway to less than 60 minutes.

6.18 In supporting the principle of a new railway station emphasis will be placed on its accessibility by public transport and road (including sufficient car parking) for established and planned residential areas. Thanet’s more densely populated areas and planned strategic housing sites are generally well served by existing railway stations and or public transport as well as having good access to a range of services. New housing development is proposed on the edge of Ramsgate and at the village of Cliffsend in close proximity to the new railway station.

Policy SP39 - New Rail Station

Planning permission will be granted for a new railway station at a suitable location on land west of Ramsgate alongside the existing railway line.  Land west of Cliffsend (shown on Map 15) is safeguarded for this purpose. Proposals will be required to specifically demonstrate all of the following:

1) Satisfactory vehicular access arrangements from East Kent Access

2) Suitable level of car parking

3) Integration with wider public transport services

4) Mitigation of any noise impacts on sensitive receptors

5) Compatibility with the landscape character of its location

6) Located to minimise the loss of best and most versatile agricultural land

Map 15 - New Rail Station

© Crown copyright and database rights 2014 Ordnance Survey 100018261
 
 Description: Parkway

 

 

 

Development Management Policies

7 - Economy

Retention of existing employment sites

7.1 The Council considers that it is essential that employment premises are retained in order to conserve stock for future use. Sites have been assessed for their compatibility with the plan's employment land strategy. The sites listed below contibute postively and are retained and protected for employment purposes accordingly:

Policy E01 - Retention of existing employment sites

The following sites will be retained for employment uses falling within Use Classes B1 and B8 in locations close to residential areas, with additional B2 in appropriate locations away from residential development:

1. All sites specifically identified under Policy SP03; and

2. Existing business sites and premises identified set out below:

Cromptons site, Poorhole Lane Broadstairs

Pysons Road Industrial Estate, Broadstairs

Thanet Reach Business Park (part), Broadstairs

Dane Valley Industrial Estate St.Peters, Broadstairs*

Northdown Industrial Estate St.Peters, Broadstairs

Manston Business Park (part), Manston

Manston Green, Manston

Manston Road Depot, Margate

Westwood Industrial Estate, Margate*

Fullers Yard, Victoria Road, Margate

Laundry Road Industrial Estate Minster

Eurokent Business Park (part), Ramsgate*

Leigh Road Industrial Estate, Ramsgate

St.Lawrence Industrial Estate, Ramsgate

Princes Road Depot/Pioneer Business Park, Ramsgate

Whitehall Road Industrial Estate, Ramsgate

Hedgend Industrial Estate, Thanet Way, St.Nicholas-at-Wade

Tivoli Industrial Estate, Margate

Manston Road Industrial Estate (part), Ramsgate

* these are flexible employment sites, where wider employment generating uses will be allowed in addition to B1, B2 and B8 uses. Development must be compatible with neighbouring uses. Proposals for main town centre uses should also comply with Policy E05 - the sequential test.

7.2 Flexible uses include leisure, tourism and other town centre uses which due to scale and format cannot be accommodated within town centres. They also include uses known as sui generis which do not fall into a category in the Use Classes Order. These include uses such as car show rooms and crèches.

Home Working

7.3 The National Planning Policy Framework requires the Council to plan for flexible working practices such as the integration of residential and commercial uses within the same unit.

7.4 The proportion of people that are home working is relatively high in Thanet according to the Economic and Employment Assessment 2012. It is not clear from the evidence whether these are small local business starting up from home or employees of companies located potentially outside the district. In either case this is considered beneficial to the Thanet's economy as a result of money spent in the district. The close juxtaposition of home and work can reduce car use, and is therefore environmentally sustainable, particularly bearing in mind the growth of fast broadband. It is therefore considered important that improvements to digital infrastructure are supported.

7.5 Flexible office space (workhubs) with professional equipment and meeting space that can be hired and used in an ad hoc manner by home based workers can also support home working. Business advice may also be important. It is considered that these facilities can be accommodated on identified Business Parks or in the town centres.

7.6 Some small scale home-working may not require planning permission. However, where home-working does require planning permission consideration should be had to the impacts upon the neighbourhood, including for example traffic, noise and disturbance.

The Council supports home working proposals but wishes to ensure that any potential impact is acceptable, as set out in the following policies.

Policy E02 - Home Working

Proposals for the establishment of a business operating from a residential property will be permitted, provided that it can be demonstrated that the proposed use would not result in:

1) Detrimental impacts on residential amenity by reason of dust, noise, smell, fumes or other emissions;

2) Additional traffic flows or vehicle parking in the vicinity, at a level that would be harmful to residential amenity or highway safety; or

3) The erosion of the residential character of the area.

 

Policy E03 - Digital Infrastructure

Proposals for the installation of digital infrastructure will be required, on allocated sites in this plan.

Retro-fitting in existing urban areas and villages will be supported, subject to no detrimental impacts on listed buildings, the character and appearance of conservation areas and historic landscapes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8 - Town and District Centres

Primary and Secondary Frontages

8.1 The National Planning Policy Framework requires local planning authorities to define the extent of primary and secondary frontages within town centres and set policies to make clear which uses will be permitted in such locations.

8.2 Healthy shopping centres rely on control over the number and location of non-retail premises within the main shopping area. The success of any particular centre is dependent, at least in part, upon retaining a reasonably close grouping of shops selling a wide range of products. This allows customers to fulfil the majority of their shopping needs in one trip, as well as providing the opportunity for comparing the price and availability of less frequently purchased goods. The existence of non-retail businesses in primary shopping areas can inhibit these activities by reducing the range of shops, and thereby potentially reducing the number of people visiting the centre, as well as making the centre less compact and therefore less convenient. However town centres perform a greater function than just retail centres. They are hubs of the community and encompass cultural, leisure, arts and heritage uses that in turn support the tourism industry and therefore in line with the strategy for the town centres outlined earlier it is considered appropriate to provide a generous secondary frontage in the coastal town centres in order to maintain and support this trend.

Policy E04 - Primary and Secondary Frontages

Primary and Secondary Frontages are defined for Westwood, Margate, Ramsgate and Broadstairs.

Within the Primary Frontages the following development will be permitted:

1) Use Classes falling within A1, A2, A3, A4 and A5.

2) Residential and Class B1(a) offices will be permitted above ground floor level only.

Within the Secondary Frontages the uses referred to in the preceding clause will be permitted as well as all other town centre uses stated in the National Planning Policy Framework including hotels and residential.

Sequential and Impact Test

8.3 Local planning authorities are required by the National Planning Policy Framework to apply a sequential test to planning applications for main town centre uses that are not in an existing centre and are not in accordance with an up-to-date Local Plan. Applications for main town centre uses should be located in town centres, then in edge of centre locations and only if suitable sites are not available should out of centre sites be considered. When considering edge of centre and out of centre proposals, preference should be given to accessible sites that are well connected to the town centre. Applicants and local planning authorities should demonstrate flexibility on issues such as format and scale.

8.4 The NPPF requires that town centre development takes places on sites within designated town centres and only there are no suitable, viable or available sites should edge of centre or out of centre locations be considered and it requires the reasons for rejecting more central sites to be clearly explained.

8.5 This sequential approach should not be applied to applications for small scale rural offices or other small scale rural development.

8.6 The NPPF also requires that applications for town centre development outside of the defined town centres above a certain threshold are accompanied by an impact test in order to assess the impact on vitality and viability of the town centres. The thresholds for Thanet are set out in policy below.

Policy E05 - Sequential and Impact Test

Proposals for main town centre uses should be located within the designated town centres of Margate, Ramsgate, Broadstairs and Westwood, comprising the primary and secondary frontages. Where this is not possible due to size, format and layout town centre uses should be located on the edge of town centres or on employment land designated for flexible uses. Outside these areas applicants should demonstrate that there is no sequentially preferable location within the catchment of the proposed development.

Applications for development above the following thresholds should be accompanied by an impact assessment:

1) Urban area – 1,000 square metres

2) Rural area - 280 square metres

The impact assessment should include:

Applicants should demonstrate flexibility on issues such as format and scale and will be expected to provide the Council with robust evidence of this.

Where an application fails to satisfy the sequential test or is likely to have an adverse impact, it will be refused.

District and Local Centres

8.7 District and Local centres perform an important role in the retail hierarchy catering for basket and top up shopping located in sustainable locations often walkable from residential areas. Developments in local parades and centres should primarily serve the community within which they are located with catchment areas of not more than 800 metres.

8.8 Thanet's District centres consist of Cliftonville, Birchington, Westgate and Minster. There are number of smaller local centres throughout the district.

8.9 The important function of District and Local Centres, particularly the services they provide for the elderly and infirm should not be compromised by an overconcentration of residential accommodation.

Policy E06 - District and Local Centres

Proposals for additional shopping provision at traditional district and local centres will be permitted where the proposals meet a local need, are of a scale appropriate to the particular centre and not more than 1000 square metres.

Residential accommodation will be permitted in District and Local centres where this would not fragment or erode the commercial frontages of such locations to a degree that compromises footfall or otherwise undermines the function of the centre.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9 - Tourism

Tourist Accommodation

9.1 The provision of sufficient quality tourist accommodation is necessary to increase tourist spend and help to extend the tourist season. These are objectives of the Council's Economic Development and Regeneration Strategy and a strategic priority of this Plan.

9.2 Existing hotel provision in the district caters well for the budget hotel market and this has been increasing in recent years, but Thanet is lacking in hotels at the top end of the market. There is also a shortage of family holiday accommodation. Hotel facilities must be attractive to tourists to capitalise on the trend for shorter breaks in the UK and demand for better overall quality and service. There is increasing demand for boutique and designer hotels fuelled by more sophisticated tastes.

9.3 Other than caravan accommodation Thanet has relatively few self-catering facilities. Touring and camping is a popular choice of tourist accommodation and is an up and coming market. Thanet is currently underprovided with these types of facilities and the Council aims to take advantage of this high demand.

9.4 It is therefore important to provide for new and protect tourist accommodation of all types and for all budgets to attract a range of staying visitors to the area, which the following policies seek to achieve.

Policy E07 - Serviced Tourist Accommodation

The Council will permit the development of new serviced tourist accommodation, including extensions and improvements to existing accommodation, where this would be well related to existing built development and subject to the following criteria:

1) Should be of a scale that does not impact on the surrounding area, including impact upon the road network.

2) Accessibility by a range of means of transport.

3) Outside of the built up area hotel development should respect landscape character and nature conservation value.

4) Sufficient mitigation should be provided against any increase in recreational pressure on designated nature conservation sites.

 

Policy E08 - Self Catering Tourist Accommodation

Proposals for the development, diversification, upgrade or improvement of self-catering accommodation will be permitted subject to the following criteria:

1) appropriate siting, design, scale and access

2) be well related to the primary and secondary road network

3) be capable of being extensively landscaped such that its impact on the character of the area is minimised.

 

Policy E09 - Protection of Existing Tourist Accommodation

Proposals that would result in the loss of existing tourist accommodation with 10 or more bedrooms will not be permitted unless it can be demonstrated that:

1) the hotel/guesthouse or self-catering accommodation is no longer viable* for such use; and

2) alternative types of holiday accommodation suitable for the property (including dual use for out of season times) are not viable*.

* In order to demonstrate that the existing tourist accommodate is not viable, evidence will be required to show that the facility has been marketed extensively for at least a year and at a competitive price. Evidence will also be required of occupancy rates for the previous 3 years, and any other relevant factors such as previous marketing or business plans, locational factors and ease of access for visitors by a range of means of transport. In assessing whether the accommodation is not viable the Council may seek the independent views of industry experts.

 

Thanet's Beaches

9.5 Thanet possesses a large number of sandy beaches, whose characters range from intensively holiday-oriented beaches (eg: Main Sands, Margate) to undeveloped beaches with a natural character and appearance (eg: Grenham Bay, Birchington). The different types of beach offer opportunities for different types of recreational activity. In the interests of choice, the Council believes that it is desirable to ensure that the differences of character are maintained, and where appropriate, enhanced. Most beaches along the Thanet coast are internationally important for their wintering bird populations.

9.6 The Council's Destination Management Plan is considering potential locations for additional beach development, including accommodation, where it would be appropriate and viable. It is also investigating ways to improve the management of the beaches for the benefit of the tourism economy.

9.7 The following policies divide the beaches into three broad categories, in order to direct and restrict development appropriately to maintain and enhance their individual function and character, and to protect the designated nature conservation sites.

9.8 It should be noted that the intermediate category includes beaches which have scope for some further development, as well as those which are fully developed within the terms of the Policy.

9.9 To provide for a variety of tastes and choice in the type of recreational activities, associated service facilities and degree of solitude on Thanet's coastline, the following Policies will apply to beach development.

 

Policy E10 - Major Holiday Beaches

On those beaches identified as major holiday beaches below, the Council will support proposals for the provision and upgrading of a wide range of recreational facilities and services including tourist accommodation:

1) Main Sands, Margate

2) Ramsgate Main Sands

3) Viking Bay, Broadstairs

Proposals must also comply with the heritage policies of this plan and the National Planning Policy Framework.

At Margate Main Sands recreational facilities will be concentrated on that part of the beach at the junction of Marine Terrace and Marine Drive and the built form shall not project above the level of the seafront promenade.

Development proposals must fully mitigate against any impact upon the designated nature conservation sites, and will be subject to the Habitats Regulations.

 

Policy E11 - Intermediate Beaches

On those beaches identified as intermediate beaches below, and where scope exists for such development, the Council will support proposals for small scale tourism and leisure development (e.g. tourist accommodation, kiosks supplying food and refreshments, beach huts and beach furniture), subject to the scale of provision being consistent with the intermediate status of the beach and satisfactory design and siting of development:

1) Dumpton Gap (part)

2) Joss Bay

3) Louisa Bay

4) Minnis Bay (part)

5) St Mildred’s Bay

6) Stone Bay

7) Walpole Bay

8) Westbrook Bay

9) Western Undercliff, Ramsgate

10) Westgate Bay

Development proposals must fully mitigate against any impact upon the designated nature conservation sites, and will be subject to the Habitats Regulations.

Policy E12 - Undeveloped Beaches

On, or adjacent to undeveloped beaches identified on the policies map (see Appendix A), priority will be given to the maintenance and enhancement of their natural and undeveloped character. New development including new built facilities, the provision of public car parking facilities and new or improved vehicular access to serve such beaches will not be permitted. In the event that development is exceptionally permitted, proposals must fully mitigate against any impact upon the designated nature conservation sites, and will be subject to the Habitats Regulations.

 

Language Schools

9.10 Thanet contains a considerable number of language schools and a large percentage of students using these services stay with Thanet families or as paying guests. In 2009 the contribution of Language Schools to the Thanet’s economy was £14 million. In 2011 £11,433,000 was spent on accommodation alone, this was up 6% on 2009.

9.11 English language schools in Thanet are therefore a major contributor to the local economy, and offer potential for encouraging the next generation of visitors to this part of Kent. The Council wishes to encourage growth in this sector of the economy.

9.12 However language schools can cause issues with noise and disturbance particularly where there are concentrations of such facilities in an area potentially resulting in large gatherings of young people. These issues need to be balanced with the benefit to the local economy, as set out in the following policy.

Policy E13 - Language Schools

Language schools will be permitted subject to:

1) The number of students to be accommodated, the hours of operation, the range of facilities provided and the relationship with adjoining properties not resulting in an unacceptable impact on the amenities of adjacent occupiers or on the character of an area as a whole through noise or general disturbance;

2) The use of the property as a language school not resulting in an over-concentration of such uses in a particular locality to a level where the character of that area is materially altered.

 

Quex Park

9.13 Quex Park Estate is set in 250 acres of parkland and trees in Thanet’s otherwise wide open landscapes.

9.14 The major attraction and point of interest is the Powell Cotton Museum which is one of the finest collections of natural history and ethnographic artefacts in existence. This was established in 1896 by Major Percy Horace Gordon Powell-Cotton. The collections support the study, understanding and enjoyment of zoological, cultural and ecological diversity of Africa and the Indian sub-continent.

9.15 The Quex Park Estate contains a wealth of heritage assets. The Mansion House dates back to the early 1400s but this was demolished between 1769 and 1849 by John Powell who replaced it with an elegant Regency home. There are also acres of historic gardens and natural woodland with traditional Victorian layout and landscaping which includes built heritage of a walled garden and green houses.

9.16 A restoration project is currently underway which includes renewed garden design based on their traditional layout and planting and restoration of the historic greenhouses.

9.17 Other heritage assets at Quex Park include the Three Towers. The Round Tower build in 1814, the Waterloo Tower built in 1819 and the clock tower above the listed coach house. The turret clock, by Benjamin Lewis Vulliamy, was installed in 1837 and sounds the quarters and the hour.

9.18 Quex Park farms 1500 acres in house plus a further 1500 acres under contract agreements with other local farmers. The main enterprises are potatoes, wheat, oilseed rape as well as a single suckling beef herd. The potatoes are used to make Kent Crisps which are widely distributed around the Country. The oilseed rape is used to produce a range of Kentish oils made by Quex foods. The Park also contains bee hives and the honey is sold locally.

9.19 The profitability of farming alone was not able to provide for the upkeep of the historic buildings and parkland despite registration for charitable status. As a result the Estate has diversified its many redundant buildings.

9.20 Therefore as well as the Museum, house and gardens Quex Estate houses Quex Barn farmers market and restaurant, Jungle Jims children’s indoor and outdoor play area, the Secret Garden centre, a paintballing arena, the Quex Maize Maze, the Craft Village, Build a Base (an indoor games arena) and Mama Feelgoods Boutique café. In addition to these individually managed enterprises the Estate also hosts weddings. The Estate as whole employs in the region of 140 people.

9.21 Quex Park is also involved in conservation and habitat creation. 55 species of bird have been spotted and over 200 trees and 3 miles of hedgerow have been created in the last decade. The Estate is involved in several conservation schemes and has a total of 150 acres in conservation management; 50 acres of which is dedicated to wildlife strips planted with native grass species to encourage insects, small rodents and birdlife; 40 acres is dedicated to low level grazing management adjacent to the River Stour to encourage native plant species and ground nesting birds; and 63 acres of summer fallow encourages bird species. The Quex Estate also has chalk caves which are home to three species of bat.

The following policy seeks to promote further development of the Quex Park Estate to support its diversification as a local enterprise, providing valuable economic and tourism benefits whilst protecting the Parks character, heritage and biodiversity.

Policy E14 - Quex Park

Farm diversification projects and tourism and leisure development at Quex Park Estate will be supported where they contribute to the upkeep of the Quex House and Gardens and the Powell-Cotton Museum and promote the Estate as a destination for tourism and leisure. Projects should be in keeping with the parkland character of the Estate, conserve and enhance the heritage assets and the Park's biodiversity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

10 - The Rural Economy

10.1 The National Planning Policy Framework requires that Local Plans support the sustainable growth and expansion of all types of business and enterprise in the rural areas, promote the development and diversification of agricultural and other land based rural businesses, support sustainable rural tourism and leisure developments that benefits businesses in the rural area and promote the retention and development of local services and community facilities. There is also the requirement for the Local Plan to address the needs of the food production industry and any barriers to investment that planning can resolve.

New build development for economic development purposes in the rural area

10.2 The NPPF states that planning policies should support economic growth in rural areas in order to create jobs and prosperity by supporting sustainable growth and expansion of all types of business and enterprise in rural areas, through well designed new buildings.

The Council wishes to support a sustainable rural economy and rural economic development of an appropriate scale and the following set policies seek to address this.

Policy E15 - New build development for economic development purposes in the rural area

Well designed new build development for economic development purposes will be permitted within the identified confines of the villages and at a scale and form compatible with their character.

Conversion of rural buildings

10.3 An important consideration for the rural economy and rural diversification is the reuse of redundant buildings. The National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) states that planning authorities should support the expansion of all types of business and enterprise in rural areas through the conversion of existing buildings.

10.4 Such conversions might be particularly desirable where buildings are listed, or have other landscape value, and their long-term retention may be sought for these reasons.

10.5 Disused rural buildings may hold species protected by the Wildlife and Conservation Act 1981 and other legislation, for example, bats or barn owls. The conversion of such buildings should make provision for their continued use by protected species which are present. If this is not possible, an alternative roosting site should be provided nearby.

Policy E16 - Conversion of rural buildings for economic development purposes

Where it can be demonstrated that the building is not needed for agricultural use the conversion of rural buildings to other uses for economic development purposes will be permitted where all the following criteria are met:

1) Their form, bulk and general design are in keeping with the character of the surrounding countryside.

2) The proposed use is acceptable in terms of its impact on the surrounding area and the local highway network.

3) Demonstrate through a structural survey that the building is capable of conversion.

4) Any alterations associated with the conversion would not be detrimental to the distinctive character of the building (or its setting), its historic fabric or features.

5) If the building forms part of a complex of agricultural or industrial buildings, a comprehensive strategy is put forward which shows the effects on the use of the remaining complex, and on any listed buildings and their settings.

6) Where the building currently contains protected species, mitigation should be provided.

Farm Diversification

10.6 The NPPF requires that planning policy should promote the development and diversification of agricultural and other land-based rural businesses.

10.7 The Council wishes to support proposals for diversification that will strengthen and protect the productive base of the farm unit that allows the farmer to continue to farm. An example would be a farm retail unit. The Council will expect an outline farm plan to be submitted with any planning application, indicating how the new diversification schemes integrates with and contributes to the overall business plan for the farm. By granting planning consent for acceptable diversification projects, the Council is indicating its long term support for a continuing viable agricultural community in Thanet.

10.8 However, farm diversification projects have the potential to result in adverse effects, for example, traffic and landscape impacts, and the depletion of financial and land resources. Applicants will therefore need to carefully assess the implications of new proposals, both for their own benefit, and to enable the Local Planning Authority to give support to acceptable and viable schemes.

The following seeks to achieve this balance.

Policy E17 - Farm Diversification

Proposals to diversify the range of economic activities on a farm will be permitted if all the following criteria are met:

1) The proposal is complementary to the agricultural operations on the farm, and is operated as part of the farm holding.

2) There would be no irreversible loss of best and most versatile agricultural land.

3) The likely traffic generation could be safely accommodated on the local highway network.

Proposals should where possible utilise available existing farm buildings.

Best and most versatile agricultural land

10.9 The Agricultural Land Classification system (ALC) provides a method for assessing the quality of farmland to enable informed choices to be made about its future use within the planning system and the presence of best and most versatile agricultural land should be taken into account alongside other sustainability considerations when determining planning applications.

10.10 The National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) requires that planning authorities should take into account the economic and other benefits of best and most versatile land. Where significant development of agricultural land is demonstrated to be necessary, local planning authorities should seek to use areas of poorer quality. The majority of agricultural land in Thanet is best and most versatile and therefore the following policy applies.

Policy E18 – Best and Most Versatile Agricultural Land

Except on sites allocated for development by virtue of other policies in this Plan, planning permission will not be granted for development which would result in the irreversible loss of best and most versatile agricultural land unless it can be clearly demonstrated that:

1) the benefits of the proposed development outweigh the harm resulting from the loss of agricultural land, and

2) there are no otherwise suitable sites of poorer agricultural quality that can accommodate the development.

Applications for solar parks on best and most versatile agricultural land should comply with Policy CC07 - Solar Parks

Agricultural related development

10.11 The National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) requires that Local Plans should support the needs of the food production industry. Agricultural related businesses are those that are not part of a farm business, such as producing and packing operations. These value adding operations are an important part of the rural economy but their scale and location should respect the character and appearance of the rural area.

Policy E19 - Agricultural Related Development

Development related to the agricultural industry will be approved subject to landscape, traffic and other planning considerations, and the scale of the development being acceptable.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11 - Housing

Identification and Release of Housing Land for Development

Allocated sites

11.1 Sites allocated for housing (including strategic site allocations) are shown on the maps and featured in a list of housing site allocations in the appendix. Notional dwelling unit capacities indicated are for the purposes of illustrating total land supply and do not signify that consent will be granted for particular numbers of dwellings at any site. Capacity on individual sites will be considered in light of planning policy and usual development management considerations.

11.2 The geographical extent indicated for site allocations affecting greenfield land represents the anticipated maximum land requirement. Proposals will be expected to consider, and where possible accommodate, notional maximum dwelling capacities indicated together with all other relevant policy requirements within a lower level of greenfield land take.

11.3 Sites will be released for development over specific time periods. The purpose of this is to ensure that the rate of release and take up is reasonably related to expected need and demand, taking account of the economic strategy and geared to planned infrastructure provision.

11.4 This Local Plan does not identify or allocate potential housing sites likely to accommodate four or less dwellings. Such proposals will be assessed in relation to policy HO1.

11.5 Land allocated for residential use will be safeguarded for that purpose in the interest of maintaining a suitable, sustainable and sufficient land supply and reducing the need to find less sustainable alternatives.

Unidentified housing sites

11.6 Sites not previously identified and allocated in Local Plans (sometimes referred to as “windfall” sites”) have contributed significantly in recent years to housing delivery in the district. It is anticipated that these will continue to come forward. Such opportunities can serve to make effective use of previously developed land and helpfully augment the housing land supply. For the purposes of the following policy, previously developed land is as defined in the NPPF and does not include residential gardens.

11.7 In the case of any allocation or unidentified housing site affecting a site within defined town centre primary frontages, within Margate seafront and harbour arm or Margate Old Town, residential development will be restricted to above ground floor level (in accordance with policies E04 and SP08)

 

Policy H01– Housing Development

Permission for new housing development will be granted on:

1) sites allocated for such purposes, subject to consistency with indicative phasing ,

2) non-allocated sites within the existing built up confines consisting of previously developed land,

3) residential gardens where not judged harmful to the local area in terms of the character and amenity considerations set out in Policy QD01,

and provided that all the following criteria are met:

4) The relevant area specific housing objectives set out in the housing strategy section are addressed.

5) It is demonstrated that adequate infrastructure will be in place to serve each unit ready for occupation.

6) Satisfactory details are provided showing how any physical conditions including land stability and contamination, affecting the site can be overcome.

7) Sufficient mitigation is provided in accordance with Policy SP25 to protect designated nature conservation sites.

8) There is no conflict with other policies.

In determining applications for development under this policy the Council will seek to ensure that development does not increase recreational pressure on designated nature conservation sites.

Alternative development on sites allocated for residential development will not be permitted.

Policy H04 applies to housing development at rural settlements.

11.8 Housing delivery will be monitored annually, and a housing implementation strategy will be put in place to facilitate delivery across the plan period including action that may be taken if necessary to maintain a rolling 5 year supply of deliverable housing sites.

Non-strategic Housing Allocations

Policy H02A – Land on west side of Old Haine Road, Ramsgate

Land to the west of Old Haine Road, Ramsgate is allocated for up to 250 new dwellings at a maximum density of 35 dwellings per hectare net. Proposals will be judged and permitted only in accordance with a development brief and masterplan for the whole site. This will be informed by and address: -

·       A Transport Assessment assessing impact on the local road network, demonstrating suitable access arrangements, identifying measures to mitigate impacts of development and demonstrating multi-modal access, including footway and cyclewway connections.

·       A travel plan

·       pre-design archaeological evaluation.

·       a statement of social impacts arising from the development and how any increased demand on community facilities will be addressed.

·       the need to clearly demonstrate how the SPA mitigation strategy as set out in Policy SP25 is being met and how it will ensure that development does not increase recreational pressure on designated sites

·       a wintering and breeding bird survey to assess impact on bird populations within the district and the need to mitigate/compensate.

·       a statement of social impacts arising from the development and how any increased demand on community facilities will be addressed.

Phasing of development will be in accordance with Policy H01(1)

A minimum of 30% of all dwellings will be affordable homes in accordance with Policy SP19. The proportion of houses as opposed to flats should exceed that in policy SP18 as much as possible.

Disposition of development and landscaping will be expected to enable a soft edge between the site and open countryside

Development will be expected to provide for any highway improvements identified as necessary in a traffic assessment

Development will be expected to provide an appropriate off-site contribution to

·       highway improvements including in respect of Westwood Relief Scheme.

·       provision, where required, of a new school.

Policy H02B- Land fronting Nash Road and Manston Road

Land fronting Nash Road and Manston Road Margate is allocated for up to 250 new dwellings at a maximum density of 35 dwellings per hectare net. Proposals will be judged and permitted only in accordance with a development brief and masterplan for the whole site, which will be informed by and address: -

1) A Transport Assessment including assessment of impact on the local road network and demonstrating measures to promote multi-modal access, including footway and cycleway connections. (Development will be expected to accommodate land required as part of a suitable scheme to address traffic capacity issues at the Coffin House Corner junction, a strategic link road through the site between Nash Road and Manston Road, and potential widening of Nash Road).

2) pre-design archaeological assessment.

3) the need to safeguard the setting of the listed building Salmestone Grange and the scheduled ancient monument.

4) the need to clearly demonstrate how the SPA mitigation strategy as set out in Policy SP25 is being met and how it will ensure that development does not increase recreational pressure on designated sites

5) a wintering and breeding bird survey to assess impact on bird populations within the district and the need to mitigate/compensate.

6) the presence of the crematorium adjoining the site.

7) liaison with service providers to investigate the need to upgrade the capacity of any utility services and infrastructure including gas supply.

8) a statement of social impacts arising from the development and how any increased demand on community facilities will be addressed.

9) appropriate arrangements for surface water management in line with Margate Surface Water Management Plan.

A minimum of 30% of all dwellings will be affordable homes in accordance with Policy SP19. The design brief should feature and reflect investigation of the need to incorporate an element of housing to meet the needs of particular groups including specifically sheltered and extra care homes. The proportion of houses as opposed to flats should exceed that in policy SP18 as much as possible.

Disposition of development and landscaping will be expected to enable a soft edge between the site and open countryside and provide a green link between the cemetery and disused railway line to the east.

Phasing of development will be in accordance with Policy H01(1) (to be related to phasing of other sites impacting/dependent on road/junction improvements identified in the Transport Strategy).

Policy H02C– Land fronting Park Lane, Birchington.

Land fronting Park Lane, Birchington is allocated for up to 90 new dwellings at a notional maximum density of 35 dwellings per hectare net. Proposals will be judged and permitted only in accordance with a development brief for the entire site. The development brief shall: -

·       be informed by a full transport assessment addressing the impact of development on the junction of Park Lane and the A28, and the junction of Manston Road/Park Lane and Acol Hill.

 

·       Demonstrate measures to promote multi-modal access, including footway and cycleway connections and an extended bus service accessible to the residential development.

·       Accommodate suitable access onto Park Lane and a footway connection to the entire frontage to connect to the existing footway in Park Lane near to the access with Brunswick Road.

·       Aim to integrate development with that at the adjacent land which is allocated as a strategic housing site.

·       Reflect the need to consider and respect the setting of Quex Park and for disposition of development and landscaping to enable a soft edge between the site and open countryside.

·       Include a wintering and breeding bird survey to assess impact on bird populations within the district and the need to mitigate/compensate.

Development will be expected to provide an appropriate contribution to off-site highway improvements including for Birchington Square/Park Lane.

A minimum of 30% of all dwellings will be affordable homes in accordance with Policy SP19. The proportion of houses as opposed to flats should exceed that in policy SP18 as much as possible.

Policy H02D- Land south of Brooke Avenue Garlinge

Land south of Brooke Avenue Garlinge is allocated for up to 34 new dwellings at a maximum density of 35 dwellings per hectare net. Phasing of development will be in accordance with Policy H01(1). Development will be informed by

1) a Transport Assessment

2) the need to clearly demonstrate how the SPA mitigation strategy as set out in Policy SP25 is being met and how it will ensure that development does not increase recreational pressure on designated sites

3) a wintering breeding bird survey and the need to mitigate the effects of impacts associated with loss of existing agricultural land, scrub and neutral grassland.

4) archaeological evaluation.

Disposition of development and landscaping will be expected to enable a soft edge between the site and open countryside.

A minimum of 30% of all dwellings will be affordable homes in accordance with Policy SP19. The proportion of houses as opposed to flats should exceed that in policy SP18 as much as possible.

 

Policy H02E - land at Haine Road and Spratling Street, Ramsgate

Land is allocated for up to 85 new dwellings at a maximum density of 35 dwellings per hectare net at Haine Road and Spratling Street, Ramsgate

Phasing of development will be in accordance with Policy H01(1). Proposals will be judged and permitted only in accordance with a development brief and masterplan for the whole site informed by a Transport Assessment and Travel Plan including assessment of impact on the local road network and demonstrating measures to promote multi-modal access

Development will incorporate and provide for suitable access arrangements together with suitable footway connections.

Masterplanning will be informed by and address:

1) liaison with service providers to investigate the need to upgrade the capacity of any utility services and infrastructure including gas supply

2) a statement of social impacts arising from the development and how any increased demand on community facilities will be addressed.

3) the need to clearly demonstrate how the SPA mitigation strategy as set out in Policy SP25 is being met and how it will ensure that development does not increase recreational pressure on designated sites

A minimum of 30% of all dwellings will be affordable homes in accordance with Policy SP19. The proportion of houses as opposed to flats should exceed that in policy SP18 as much as possible.

Disposition of development and landscaping will be expected to enable a soft edge between the site and open countryside.

 

Policy H02F - Land south of Canterbury Road East, Ramsgate

Land on the south side of Canterbury Road east is allocated for up to 27 new dwellings at a maximum density of 35 dwellings per hectare net. Phasing of development will be in accordance with Policy H01(1). Proposals will be judged and permitted only in accordance with a development brief informed by archaeological evaluation and ecological evaluation.

A minimum of 30% of all dwellings will be affordable homes in accordance with Policy SP19. The proportion of houses as opposed to flats should exceed that in policy SP18 as much as possible.

Proposals will be required to clearly demonstrate how the SPA mitigation strategy as set out in Policy SP25 is being met and how it will ensure that development does not increase recreational pressure on designated sites

Disposition of development and landscaping will be expected to address the need to retain and enhance trees and hedgerows for their biodiversity interest.

 

Cliftonville and Margate

Cliftonville and Margate

11.9 The adjoining wards of Cliftonville West and Margate Central contain Thanet’s most deprived neighbourhoods. This is manifested in high levels of economic dependency, and a fragmented community. The area has a predominance of cheap and poor quality rented accommodation often attracting vulnerable and transient people. The Cliftonville Development Plan Document contains planning policies restricting additional accommodation in forms likely to fuel or perpetuate these problems.

11.10 The Council and its partners including Kent County Council and the Homes and Communities Agency are implementing a concerted programme “Live Margate” to focus and stimulate further investment in making Margate and, in particular, these two wards, an area where people aspire to live. A central feature of the programme is purchasing existing properties and turning them into quality family homes. The following policy supports proposals resulting from or compatible with this initiative. In addition to relevant policies in the Cliftonville DPD, the following policy will apply.

Policy H03 - Cliftonville West and Margate central

Proposals to provide residential accommodation in Cliftonville West and Margate Central wards (as defined in the map below) will be expected to demonstrate compatibility with the following objectives:

1) improving poor quality homes

2) increasing the number of family homes

3) creating mixed settled communities where families and individuals will want to live

4) improving the urban fabric or street scene and environment

Map 16 - Cliftonville West and Margate Central

© Crown copyright and database rights 2014 Ordnance Survey 100018261
 
 Description: Cliftonville West and Margaret Central Wards

 

Housing at Rural Settlements

11.11 Most of Thanet’s villages consist of freestanding rural settlements. These comprise Acol, Cliffsend, Manston, Minster, Monkton, Sarre and St. Nicholas. Each makes its own contribution to the character and diversity of the Thanet countryside, and the Council considers that it is essential for them to retain their separate physical identity and vibrant communities. There are some settlements that, due to their mutual proximity, are potentially vulnerable to coalescence through the development along the road frontages that link them; for example, Minster to Monkton and Manston to Ramsgate. Policies protecting the open countryside provide appropriate safeguards for this.

Housing at Rural Settlements

11.12 The National Planning Policy Framework notes that to promote sustainable development in rural areas, housing should be located where it will enhance or maintain the vitality of rural communities.  In support of the Local Plan's housing objectives the rural settlements are considered to have some scope for new housing development in order to meet local needs and augment locational choice within overall objectively assessed need.  A separate housing topic paper considers the scale of housing that could be accommodated at each of Thanet's rural settlements.  This has helped to inform the following policy.

11.13 Policy H01(1) allocates specific sites for housing development including at some of the rural villages. These are listed below.

11.14 The following policy indicates the scale of housing development that may also be permitted on other sites in the rural settlements of Minster, Cliffsend, St Nicholas, Monkton, Manston, Acol and Sarre.

11.15 The impacts referred to in the policy will be considered cumulatively having regard to potential or completed development associated with site allocations and other development permitted in the settlement under policies H01, H04 and H05. In interpreting the following policy, the villages of Sarre, Manston and Acol are regarded as unsuitable for more than development of minor scale such as infilling within their built confines.

Policy H04 - Housing at Rural Settlements

Housing development will be permitted within the confines of the rural settlements subject to the provisions of policy H01 and the criteria below.

1) The proposal being compatible with the size, form, historic character and historic scale of growth of the settlement, and

2) In the case of development more than minor in scale accessible community services will be available.

The sites listed below are specifically allocated for residential development under policy H01. The appropriate dwelling capacity on each site will be considered in light of planning policy and usual development management considerations, and capacities featured in the housing sites allocations appendix should be regarded as a notional maximum.

Table 6 - Sites Allocated for Residential Development at Rural Settlements

Tothill Street, Minster  (site reference S511/S436 & S85)

 

Foxborough Lane (south side), Minster (site ref ST6)

 

Station Road, Minster  (Site ref S088)

 

Land at The Length, St. Nicholas (Site ref S509)

 

Land at Manor Road, St Nicholas (Site ref S488/R25-146)

 

Land at  71-75 Monkton Street, Monkton (site ref S240)

 

Land at Walter's Hall Farm, Monkton (site ref ST6)

 

Builders yard south of 116-124 Monkton Street, Monkton (site ref S543/R25-135)

 

Land south side of A253, Cliffsend (site ref S468)

 

Land north of Cottington Road, Cliffsend (site ref S435(2)

 

Land south side of Cottington Road, Cliffsend  (site ref S416/S541)

 

Jentex site Canterbury Road West, Cliffsend (site ref S428)

 

Young's Nursery, Arundel Road, Cliffsend (site ref S455)

Applications for housing development at and adjoining the rural settlements will be expected to

a) demonstrate that engagement has taken place with the relevant parish council to: - 

·         assess and where feasible incorporate an appropriate element of housing to meet any identified need for particular types of housing arising in the parish including sheltered and extra care housing. 

·         address how any affordable element to be provided can serve to address need arising in the relevant parish as priority.

·         identify any community facilities required and scope for incorporating or contributing towards provision of these. 

b) be informed by liaison with the County Council as education authority regarding the need to accommodate or contribute to any required expansion or improvements to village primary school capacity.

Applications involving loss of agricultural land, scrub and neutral grassland should be accompanied by a wintering and breeding bird survey.

 

The following policies and informatives provide additional necessary guidance where required in respect of specific allocated sites.

 

Policy H04A -  Land at Tothill Street, Minster

Proposals for residential development will be expected to

1)    be informed by an archaeological pre-design evaluation and transport assessment.  Vehicular access would need to be provided to Tothill Street and links southwards with existing development restricted to pedestrian and cycle routes in order to limit additional traffic movement in the vicinity of Monkton Road and High Street.

2)    provide an appropriate contribution to off-site highway improvements.

3)    incorporate open space in accordance with the standards set out in Policy SP27, and in consultation with Minster Parish Council address the need to safeguard land suitably located within the site for expansion of the existing cemetery.

Informative

In light of the site’s proximity to the cemetery and former transport depot and its location in an area with sensitive groundwater requiring continued protection consultation with the Environment Agency and contamination assessment is likely to be required.

 

Policy H04B -  Land at Manor Road, Saint Nicholas-at-Wade

Proposals for residential development will be expected to

1) be informed by a transport assessment and may be required to contribute to traffic management measures to avoid increasing traffic movements at the junction of Manor Road with The Length.

2)    incorporate open space in accordance with the standards set out in Policy SP27

 

Policy H04C  Land at71-75 Monkton Street, Monkton

Proposals for residential development will be expected to be informed by an archaeological pre-determination evaluation

Informative.

In light of use for demolition yard and steel dismantling a preliminary contamination risk assessment may be required.

 

Policy H04D  Land at Walter’s Hall Farm

Proposals for residential development shall be informed by archaeological evaluation and development shall be laid out and designed so as to respect the setting of the listed building.

   

Policy H04E Land south side of A253, Cliffsend.  

Proposals for residential development will be expected to:

·         be informed by a pre-design archaeological evaluation

·         explore the potential of, and provide where possible, sustainable connections to the proposed Parkway station.

·         be informed by contamination assessment to investigate potential pollution in light of the site’s proximity to Jentex Petroleum.

Access arrangements will need to be onto the A253 and avoid access or additional traffic onto Foad’s Lane.

 

Policy H04F  Land north of Cottington Rd, Cliffsend

Proposals for residential development will be expected to:

·         be informed by further archaeological assessment including fieldwork

·         include a targeted assessment of the impact of development on the setting of St. Augustine’s Cross.

·         avoid excessive traffic use of Foad’s Lane and include a transport statement taking account of traffic impacts onto the Foad’s Lane area.

·         explore the potential of, and provide where possible, sustainable connections to the proposed Parkway station.

 

Policy H04G Land south side of Cottington Rd, Cliffsend 

Proposals for residential development will be expected to

·         be informed further archaeological assessment including fieldwork

·         include a targeted assessment of the impact of development on the setting of St. Augustine’s Cross.

·         Include a flood risk assessment.

A transport statement will be needed to take account of traffic impacts onto Foad’s Lane area, and proposals will be expected to explore the potential of, and provide where possible, sustainable connections to the proposed Parkway station.

 

 

Informatives

a - Builder’s Yard south of 116-124 Monkton Street, Monkton

Proposals for residential development will be expected to be informed by contact with Monkton Parish Council regarding the potential need to relocate/modernise the village hall and an enhanced communal area behind the street frontage.

In light of former builder’s yard use a contamination assessment may be required.

 

b Jentex site, Canterbury Road West, Cliffsend

 Proposals for residential development will need to be informed by the latest available predictions of aircraft noise.

 Early consultation with Environment Agency and an assessment of potential contamination of ground and groundwater together with appropriate remedial measures may be required to address identified risk.

 

c Land at south side of Foxborough Lane, Minster

Presence of bat and reptile presence may require investigation.

 Rural Housing Need

11.16 The National Planning Policy Framework expects a responsive approach to local housing needs in rural areas, and indicates that release of rural exception sites may be an appropriate means of responding to local need for affordable homes.

11.17 Rural housing needs surveys carried out in 2013 demonstrate that unmet local need exists for affordable housing in most of Thanet’s rural settlements. Where the Council is satisfied that there is no viable scope to meet this need including under policies H01 or H04, it will consider exceptional site release in line with the following policy.

11.18 Any such release would be conditional upon the first and all subsequent occupiers being first time buyers who are already village residents or children of village residents, village residents living in unsuitable accommodation, dependents of village residents, people whose work is based in the village, or people (normally the children of a household) with local connections who have been forced to move away from the village due to a lack of affordable or suitable housing.

11.19 Provision for some new village housing is made through other policies. Proposals on exceptions sites which include market housing or low cost housing giving only an initial one-time purchase subsidy will not be permitted.

11.20 Any exceptional consent will be subject to a legal agreement to ensure the housing is available to meet local needs in the long term.

 

Policy H05 - Rural Housing Need

Exceptionally consent will be granted for affordable housing development outside the confines of a rural settlement provided all the following criteria are met:

1) The affordable housing would be of a scale, type and mix to accommodate identified local need arising within the settlement/parish concerned.

2) The need has been demonstrated in a detailed parish survey, independently verified if required, and has the support of the relevant parish council.

3) There is no reasonable alternative means of meeting the identified need.

4) The location and form of development is acceptable in terms of access, proximity to local services, relationship to the rural settlement and landscape impact.

Agricultural dwellings

11.21 The National Planning Policy Framework states that isolated homes in the countryside should be avoided unless there are special circumstances such as the essential need for a rural worker to live permanently at or near their place of work in the countryside.

11.22 Much of Thanet's countryside is in agricultural use. Planning permission will normally only be granted for a farm dwelling where an agricultural need has been demonstrated. In this context, need means the need of the particular farm business, rather than the owner or occupier of the farm or holding.

11.23 The District Council takes the view that, in Thanet, agricultural need is directly related to the security of certain types of livestock, and horticultural produce. Thanet's agricultural land is almost exclusively in arable production which, by its nature, is not as susceptible to damage as other forms of agriculture.

11.24 The pattern of agricultural holdings in Thanet is well-established and stable, and the agricultural area is generally in close proximity to the urban areas. In view of this, the Council believes that there is, generally speaking, little justification for new agricultural dwellings. Proposals for agricultural dwellings required for security purposes will be expected to be supported by information demonstrating that alternative measures such as CCTV have been considered.

Policy H06 - New agricultural dwellings

The provision of new agricultural dwellings in the district will only be permitted where it is demonstrated that:

1) there is a genuine security concern which necessitates that provision; or

2) a new viable agricultural unit requires on-site accommodation for operational purposes; and

3) the proposal is acceptable in terms of access, design and location.

Where planning permission for a new dwelling is granted on the basis of agricultural requirements, a condition or legal agreement will be required to restrict occupation of the dwelling to agricultural workers and their dependents, or persons last employed in agriculture.

11.25 The Strategic Housing Market Assessment also considers the housing needs of families, older people, young people, people with disabilities, gypsies and travellers and students. The following additional policies aim to embrace needs and issues identified.

Care and Supported Housing

11.26 The range of accommodation needed by various groups in the community extends beyond conventional dwellings to more specialised forms of accommodation such as sheltered housing(specialist accommodation typically individual apartments with on-site support in secure surroundings), extra care housing (typically individual apartments for older people with varying levels of care need and benefiting from shared facilities such as laundry, lounges or garden), residential care homes and nursing homes providing 24/7 care. Kent County Council is preparing a strategy to help deliver choice and access to high quality accommodation to vulnerable adults eligible for care and support. A key principle of this is to ensure people are not isolated from their communities and are able to live healthily and safely in their own homes as long as they wish/appropriate. The accommodation strategy is informed by estimates of projected demand for need for particular types of accommodation. However, gaps in provision will be identified and addressed to reflect the objective of independent living and promoting appropriate housing and support to reduce reliance on residential and nursing care.

11.27 Thanet has historically been overprovided with some forms of accommodation which has caused concerns regarding importation and concentration of vulnerable and dependent people. For example in Spring 2013 it was estimated that nearly 2/3 of the 525 looked after children in Thanet were placed from areas outside the district; the majority of placed children being from outside Kent. While sympathetic to the needs of such people, the Council does not regard this overprovision of accommodation to meet demand arising outside the local area as sustainable or conducive to a balanced and confident community. Therefore in considering individual proposals the Council will have regard to evidence of local need and, where applicable, the potential contribution development could make to the accommodation strategy for adult social care clients in Kent (Kent County Council).

11.28 The needs of the district for supported housing are an important consideration, and proposals meeting such need and in line with the Supporting People Strategy will be supported. Sheltered housing proposals will be supported where it is demonstrated that proposals would accommodate expected needs arising within the district.

11.29 For the purposes of planning policy, proposals for retirement homes, sheltered housing and extra care housing will, unless circumstances indicate otherwise, be regarded as residential dwellings and subject to usual planning policies for residential development. Where accommodation provides a higher level of care, such as nursing homes, then such uses will be regarded as Class C2 and specifically subject to clause 2 of the following policy.

11.30 The following policy seeks to facilitate an appropriate level of provision of good quality accommodation in line with the objective of supporting a balanced and inclusive community, and enabling independent living as far as possible.

 

Policy H07 - Care and Supported Housing

The Council will seek to approve applications that provide good quality accommodation that is needed to support the housing and care requirements of Thanet's community (including provision of facilities and services which will support independent living).

Where such accommodation falls within Use Class C2 proposals will be expected to demonstrate they are suitably located to meet the needs of the occupiers including proximity and ease of access to community facilities and services, and compatible with surrounding land uses.

Accessible Homes

11.31 Accessible homes are important not only to meet the independent living needs of Thanet's aging population but also those of other households who have mobility limitations for example as a result of disability. Lifetime homes are ordinary homes designed to incorporate features adding comfort and convenience and support the changing needs of their occupiers over different life stages. In light of recommendations in the SHMA the following policy aims to secure an element of new homes to be constructed to such standards.

11.32 Lifetime Homes do not accommodate the greater space and flexibility needs of all wheelchair users. It is estimated that by 2031 there would be some 100 wheelchair user households in Thanet with an unmet housing need. The following policy therefore aims to offset that need through an element of new homes being constructed to wheelchair accessible standards. Applicants will be expected to demonstrate that such element complies with independent bona fide wheelchair standards.

11.33 The policy sets out target elements to be sought, and the precise level appropriate for any scheme will be subject to negotiation with developers taking account of appropriate factors such as the location of the site, accessibility of amenities and the nature of the proposed development.

 

Policy H08 - Accessible Homes

Developments comprising 15 or more dwellings will be expected to include an element of at least 20% across all tenures constructed to Lifetime Homes standards

Developments comprising 100 or more dwellings will be expected to include a minimum of 2% constructed to Wheelchair Accessible standards.

 

Houses in Multiple Occupation including student accommodation

11.34 Accommodation within a building can be regarded as non-self-contained where unrelated households share one or more facilities such as a bathroom or kitchen. Houses in Multiple Occupation (HMOs) are an example where a high degree of sharing of facilities is typical, and where living arrangements, being more intense than single family occupation, can give rise to noise, nuisance, more callers, a higher parking requirement and visual deterioration of buildings and gardens.

11.35 While the District Council does not wish to encourage proliferation of HMO's as a permanent measure, it does recognise that such sharing arrangements can provide a source of cheap rented accommodation, including affordable accommodation for students and supported housing. The previous Local Plan applied a criteria based policy, whose principles are considered to remain valid.

11.36 In 2010 government introduced new legislation signifying that planning permission would no longer be required for change of use of a dwelling house to a house in multiple occupations for up to 6 unrelated people. The Council subsequently approved an Article 4 direction so that planning permission would still be required for such change of use in Thanet.

11.37 The extent to which non-self-contained accommodation may generate the problems referred to above depends not only on intensity of occupation, sharing of facilities and management of the building, but also the nature of the area in which it is situated, the type of building, and the concentration of similar uses in its vicinity.

11.38 Alternative use of family homes as private student accommodation in the form of multiple occupations has caused local concerns focused on the neighbourhood around the Broadstairs University campus. Christ Church University and East Kent College are highly important for delivering skills required by the workforce, meeting the expectations of existing and potential employers and stemming out migration of young people. Supporting the functions of our higher and further education establishments includes the need to recognise demand arising for suitably located decent accommodation for students. At the same time it is essential to ensure that satisfying such demand does not result in undue concentration of non self-contained accommodation in order to avoid local disturbance and to maintain a mixed and settled community.

11.39 In 2014 the percentage of properties in use as private sector student accommodation in the form of HMO’s at the residential estate adjoining the campus was estimated at 2.4%. While such uses have generated local concern, including that recent changes of use might signal an ongoing trend, the Council does not consider that restriction on further change of use is currently justified in principle. Nonetheless, these concerns point to the need to incorporate within policy an indicative ceiling level of cumulative impact in order to maintain mixed and settled communities. Having assessed the circumstances in the district and approaches applied in other locations, the Council considers 5% represents an appropriate level. Bearing in mind the potential for displacement pressure that such restriction may generate, this level is considered appropriate across the district. In order to address potential for localised concentration within this headroom, the 5% is applied on the basis of a 50 metre radius.

11.40 A separate Development Plan Policy Document for Cliftonville imposes a restriction on HMO’s, and in the area it applies to that DPD takes precedence over the following policy.

 

Policy H09 - Non self-contained residential accommodation

In considering applications to establish or regularise non self-contained residential accommodation or before instigating enforcement proceedings under planning powers to require cessation of such use, account will be taken of:

1) the likely or experienced effect of the use on the character and amenity of the locality resulting from noise, disturbance and visual impact;

2) whether the proposed or unlawful use would or has resulted in an intensification or concentration of such uses to a level which is detrimental to the amenity and character of the neighbourhood including in relation to the considerations set out in (1) above;

3) the adequacy of provision and suitability of arrangements for car parking on site or the likely or experienced impact of parking needs being met on street; and

4) the suitability of arrangements for dustbin storage and collection.

Applications will be considered contrary to part 2 of this policy where they would result in more than (or further exceed) 5% of properties in such use within a 50m radius of the application property (or exceed or further exceed 1 HMO in any frontage of 20 dwellings). Proposals below this threshold will additionally be considered on their individual merits against all other clauses of this policy.

Operational Note

Noise problems generated by particular individuals in non-self-contained residential accommodation are essentially a management matter. In considering regularisation of non-self-contained accommodation, the Council will have regard only to the extent that noise is generated as a result of the nature of that use i.e. resulting from intensity of occupation and living arrangements.

 

Gypsy and Travelling Communities

11.41 There is only occasional camping by the gypsy and travelling communities in Thanet. This can probably be attributed to lack of suitable work and the fact that Thanet is not an “en route” stopping place. In 2013 a Gypsy and Traveller Accommodation Assessment was conducted covering Thanet, and neighbouring Dover, Canterbury and Shepway districts. This concludes that there is no pitch requirement for Gypsy, Traveller or Travelling Showpeople in Thanet. On this basis no specific provision is identified in this Local Plan. Should proposals nevertheless come forward to provide sites for such accommodation applications will be considered on the basis of the following policy.

 

Policy H10 - Accommodation for Gypsy and Travelling Communities

The use of land to provide accommodation for Gypsy and Travelling communities will be permitted provided the proposed use will not impact unreasonably on surrounding uses or local environmental quality, and the site has reasonable access to local facilities and services, particularly schools, employment and healthcare and lies outside areas at risk of flooding.

Making best use of the existing stock

11.42 The National Planning Policy Framework expects empty housing and empty buildings to be identified and brought back into use in line with local housing and empty homes strategies. As indicated in the Council's housing strategy, the Council is committed to bringing empty properties back into use.

11.43 Thanet has a substantial stock of empty property and vacant dwellings; a significant percentage of which have been vacant for more than 6 months. The Council maintains a vigorous approach to bringing back empty property into use recognising that it can support area regeneration and provide a valuable contribution to the housing stock.

 

Policy H11 - Residential use of empty property

Within urban and village confines proposals to bring vacant property into residential use will be approved where:

1) compatible with nearby uses, and

2) the proposal would not conflict with any other policy.

 

11.44 To complement policies aimed at increasing the overall housing stock it is important to retain the existing housing stock in such use.

Policy H12 - Retention of existing housing stock

Proposals which would lead to the loss of existing housing (class C3) will be permitted only where one or more of clauses 1 - 3 apply.

1) The proposal relates to the provision of community facilities which it can be demonstrated need to be so located to benefit the client community and are compatible with the residential amenity of the locality.

2) The proposal is for tourism related uses complying with Policy E07

3) The proposal would facilitate development contributing to the relevant area based housing objectives.

and provided

4) where the property lies within a primary frontage the alternative use would be compatible with Policy E04 and

5) where the proposal relates to a House in Multiple Occupation it would be compatible with Policy H09.

 

 

 

12 - Green Infrastructure

Locally Designated Wildlife Sites

12.1 Thanet has two Local Nature Reserves located at Monkton and Pegwell Bay, and eight Local Wildlife Sites. These sites host locally important habitats.

12.2 There are also four Roadside Nature Reserves which have been identified for their habitats and connections to areas of rich biodiversity, and include important features such as calcareous grassland, lizard orchids and diverse populations of butterflies and dragon flies.

The Council considers it important to protect locally designated wildlife sites. The following planning policy seeks to maintain the biodiversity and wildlife at the locally designated wildlife sites.

Policy GI01 – Locally Designated Wildlife Sites

Development which would have a detrimental impact on locally designated wildlife sites will not be permitted unless suitable mitigation can be provided either on or off site within Thanet. Exceptionally, where a strategic need for a proposed development is identified which outweighs the importance of the locally designated sites and cannot be located elsewhere, an equivalent area of habitat will be created elsewhere at a suitable location well related to other existing habitats.

Wherever possible and appropriate, new developments will include measures to enhance and connect locally designated wildlife sites.

Regionally Important Geological Sites (RIGS)

12.3 Thanet has three Regionally Important Geological Sites (RIGS) that are important for historical, scientific research or educational reasons. These are located at Monkton Nature Reserve, Pegwell Bay and St Peters Quarry.

The importance and significance of these sites are acknowledged through the following policy.

Policy GI02 – Regionally Important Geological Sites (RIGS)

At RIGS sites, development which would result in the loss or obstruction of geological features of importance will not be permitted.

Protected Species and other significant species

12.4 The open countryside within the Thanet is known to support a number of important species of farmland birds. As farmland birds have declined over the last few decades it is important to ensure that remaining populations are protected and allowed to increase. The green wedges also provide a dispersal route for migratory bird species which are present on the coast, especially during the winter season. Changing farming practices within the Green Wedges would help to increase populations of farmland and migratory birds by enabling more ecologically diverse habitat to be created.

12.5 Species protected under the Wildlife and Countryside Act, the Protection of Badgers Act or the Habitats Directive may be present on sites and would be a material consideration in the assessment of development proposals. Natural England provide Standing Advice for planning applications providing details the likelihood that protected species are present because of the associated habitats, advice on whether survey reports are required, guidance on the survey requirements for protected species and advice on mitigation proposals.

The following policy seeks to protect, maintain and enhance biodiversity and wildlife, by recognising that important species should be protected and requires this to be considered in determining planning applications for development.

Policy GI03 – Protected Species and other significant species

On sites where protected species or farmland birds may be present, the Council will require a Protected Species survey to be carried out alongside any development proposals. Any mitigation necessary should be carried out in line with Natural England's Standing Advice.

Requirements for New Open Space

12.6 An Open Space Audit was carried out in 2005 which assessed Thanets open space provision. The results and recommendations are set out in Table 7. The following policies seek to deliver these recommendations for open space provision in new development.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Table 7 - Requirements for New Open Space

Type

Primary Purpose

Current Provision

Recommended Provision

Provision in ha at time of survey

Amount needed to meet standards with population increase of 16 900 (pop in 2031=152 500)

Accessibility Standard

To be provided by:

Natural and semi-natural green space

Including Nature reserves, woodlands, wildlife conservation, biodiversity and environmental education awareness

0.95ha per 1000 population

2ha per 1000 population.

119.7

34

All dwellings should be within 2.5km of a good quality natural/semi natural greenspace

On-site provision for over 50 dwellings

Urban and Country Parks

High quality parks that offer a wide range of facilities for formal and informal recreation and events

1.06 ha per 1000 population

Minimum 1.06ha per 1000 population.

134.68

18.02

All dwellings should be within 1km of a good quality site

On-site provision for over 50 dwellings

Formal Gardens

High quality laid out gardens including memorial gardens that include formal grass areas, floral and permanent landscaping and seating

Local Parks and Recreation Grounds

Small parks and recreation grounds that offer a limited range of facilities for informal and formal sport, play and recreation. These sites offer more than just areas for children's play

Allotments

Opportunities for those people who wish to grow their own produce as part of the long term promotion of sustainability, health and social inclusion

0.19ha per 1000 population

0.19ha per 1000 population

24.46

18ha

On-site provision for over 50 dwellings

Amenity Green Space

Opportunities for informal activities close to residential areas and improve the visual appearance of residential or other areas

0.51 ha per 1000 population

0.5 ha per 1000 population.

65.29

8.5

All dwellings should be within 0.82km of good quality informal green space

Preference for on-site provision

Equipped Play Areas

Areas designed primarily for play and social interaction involving children and young people, such as equipped play areas, multi-use games areas, skateboard areas and teenage play zones

0.2ha per 1000 population-

0.7ha per 1000 population.

25.2

11.9

All dwellings should be within 0.87km of good quality equipped play area

Preference for on-site provision

Total Amount of Open Space Required for Plan Period = 75.65 Ha

 


Amenity Green Space and Equipped Play Areas

12.7 Thanet's three main coastal towns each have a ‘flagship’ playground, as well as other standard playgrounds. There are also three skate parks in Thanet.

12.8 The cumulative impact of smaller housing developments and population increase will put pressure upon existing amenity green spaces and existing play facilities. With the drive to provide more housing on brownfield land in urban areas, whether it is new build or conversion, ‘smaller’ sites are likely to be developed. New family housing should provide gardens to ensure the provision of "doorstep" playspace. High quality areas of amenity space and children’s play areas will contribute to quality of life and help social interaction.

12.9 Children's playspace should be adequately equipped and safely and conveniently available to all new residential developments of a size and type likely to generate demand for it. The location of facilities should, however, take into account the potential impact of noise and other disturbance on neighbouring properties. In addition to play space for younger children, facilities for teenagers should also be considered.

12.10 Where a development is proposed for 10-49 units, the Council will expect a commuted payment to be made for the provision, maintenance and upgrade of play facilities.

12.11 Where a development is proposed for 50 or more units, the Council will require the development to incorporate local play area provision to meet the standards set out in Table 7. Such provision will be expected to include an equipped play area and casual/informal playspace.

12.12 The provision of open spaces should be considered at an early stage in the design process and consider:

12.13 The Planning Obligations & Developer Contributions Supplementary Planning Document gives details of how financial contributions can be made towards the upkeep and maintenance of existing play areas if on site provision is not possible. The SPD will be subject to review if the Council implements the Community Infrastructure Levy.

The following policy seeks to ensure the recommended provision of amenity and children’s play space is provided for.

 

Policy GI04 – Amenity Green Space and Equipped Play Areas

New residential development will make provision for appropriate amenity green space and equipped play areas to meet the standards set in Table 7. The type and amount of open space to be provided will depend on:

1. The size and location of the development

2. Existing open space provision near the development site and

3. The number of people likely to live in the proposed development.

New family dwellings* will be expected to incorporate garden space in order to provide a safe "doorstep"** play area for young children.

In exceptional circumstances where it would be impractical to provide adequate and suitably located playspace as part of the development, then a financial contribution may instead be acceptable to offset the costs resulting from the additional use and need for increased maintenance and play equipment at suitably located existing playspaces and amenity areas.

The developer will be responsible for the funding and arrangement of the ongoing maintenance and management of amenity and play areas which will be secured through a legal agreement.

*Family dwellings are considered to be those having two or more bedrooms.

** Doorstep playspace is defined as playspace for young children which is immediately adjacent to, closely visible and safely accessible from the dwellings served.

Outdoor Sports Facilities

12.14 The National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) states that planning policies should plan positively for the provision of sports venues, guard against the unnecessary loss of facilities and that access to high quality open spaces and opportunities for sport and recreation can make an important contribution to the health and well-being of communities.

12.15 Outdoor sports facilities, include pitches, greens, courts, athletics tracks and miscellaneous sites such as croquet lawns and training areas. This includes facilities owned by the local authority, education authorities or facilities within the voluntary, private or commercial sectors that serve the outdoor leisure needs for their members or the public.

12.16 The Infrastructure Delivery Plan will include a more up to date assessment of the current provision of sports facilities and sets out the requirements for future provision.

12.17 It is envisaged, therefore, that for most developments, it will not be practical to provide land for outdoor sports facilities on the site. In such cases the Council will seek financial contributions from developers for the provision of new facilities or the upgrade or renewal of existing facilities. The Planning Obligations & Developer Contributions Supplementary Planning Document gives details of how financial contributions can be made and how they will be calculated. The SPD will be subject to review if the Council implements the Community Infrastructure Levy. The Council is currently undertaking a review of playing fields which will establish a local standard and also keeps an audit of sports facilities in the district. This forms the basis for identifying where improvements or any new facilities are needed.

Protection of Playing Fields and Outdoor Sports Facilities

12.18 The important contribution that sport and recreation, as well as community facilities, can make in improving people’s quality of life is now widely accepted. Participation in sport and recreation can improve the health and well-being of an individual, whilst sports clubs and community facilities can improve social interaction and provide a sense of community pride.

12.19 The current provision for outdoor facilities is considered to be just sufficient, therefore any loss of outdoor sports facilities should be resisted.

Policy GI05 – Protection of Playing Fields and Outdoor Sports Facilities

Built development will not be permitted on playing fields or on land last used as a playing field unless one or more of the following applies:

1) It is demonstrated that there is an excess of playing field provision in the area, for current and future uses of both the school and the community;

2) The proposed use is ancillary to the primary use as a playing field and does not affect the quantity or quality of pitches or adversely affect their use;

3) The proposed development is on land incapable of forming a pitch or part of a pitch and does not result in the loss of, or inability to make use of, a pitch;

4) The playing field or fields that would be lost as a consequence of the proposed development would be replaced, prior to the commencement of the development, by a playing field or fields of a similar or better quality in a suitable location and subject to equivalent or better management arrangements;

5) The proposed development is for an indoor or outdoor sports facility, the provision of which would be of sufficient benefit to sport and recreation as to outweigh the detriment caused by the loss of the playing field or playing fields

 

 

Landscaping and Green Infrastructure in New Developments

12.20 A positive natural environment can have economic benefits by making the area a place where people want to live. New developments should contribute to and enhance the natural environment.

12.21 Green infrastructure can be created through landscaping and design by providing wildlife corridors and stepping stones in new developments, creating links between existing habitats. This can contribute to people’s health and well-being by keeping people in touch with their natural environment, and providing opportunities for residents to manage their local environment and reinforce a sense of community.

12.22 Landscaping can create a pleasant setting for development, provide shade from the sun and pollution attenuation as trees and shrubs absorb water and dust. It should be an integral part of the design of a development, rather than consisting of ‘offcuts’ of leftover land or as a way of camouflaging poor design.

12.23 Landscaping designs should, in the first instance, be related to each plot of land so that each future owner would be responsible for its upkeep, reducing the burden on Council resources. If this is not possible or desirable, commuted payments through legal agreements may be negotiated in appropriate circumstances. Accordingly, landscaping matters should be considered at the earliest stages of the design process.

12.24 Thanet has relatively few trees. The Council will therefore seek to retain existing trees as part of any proposed developments through the making of Tree Preservation Orders and through use of planning conditions where appropriate. British Standard BS5837: 2012 (Guide for Trees in Relation to Design, Demolition and Construction) gives guidance regarding the best approach to new site development in relation to existing trees.

The Council seeks to retain hedges and other semi-natural habitat, such as ponds and species-rich grassland, together with new planting, as they lend maturity to a development and can enhance biodiversity and wildlife habitats, through the following policy.

Policy GI06 - Landscaping and Green Infrastructure

When a development proposal requires a design and access statement, it will include a landscape survey. The Landscape Survey should describe the current landscape features on the application site, and demonstrate how the proposed development will provide landscaping and green infrastructure to enhance the setting of the development, where possible and appropriate, to:

The Council will require to be satisfied that the developer has made adequate arrangements to ensure continued maintenance of landscaping, and may seek to secure arrangements for this purpose by entering into a planning agreement.

12.25 Jackey Bakers sports ground is Thanet’s main area for sports and recreation purposes. The site provides the best opportunity to both enhance existing facilities, and in the longer term, to increase the level of facilities.

12.26 Any new sports development may be supported by a limited development of D2 (leisure facilities) or A3 (restaurants) or D1 (community facilities) uses to subsidise the sporting use and ensure it is viable. Any such proposal will need to be subject to a full justification being made when any application is submitted and will be judged against the amount of land retained for open sporting purposes. There are current proposals for a new astro-turf pitch and pavilion with changing facilities.

Policy GI07 - Jackey Bakers

Jackey Bakers sports ground will be promoted as the long-term primary sports venue for Thanet. Where fully justified, the council will permit ancillary development to subsidise the sports use.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

13 - Quality Development

General Design Principles

13.1 There are many areas in Thanet which are considered to possess certain valuable qualities such as their open form of development, the separation between buildings and the positive contribution made by landscaping. The design, scale and grouping of existing buildings, the spaces between them, the texture, type and colour of materials, enclosure, land contours and views all contribute to the character and identity of a place. New development should respect and complement its surroundings, and enhance areas that are less attractive. Materials should normally be of a local type and harmonise with those of adjoining development (where these present a pleasing appearance). Architectural style should respect that of other development in the locality. Innovation in decoration can, if sensitively considered, enhance the identity and character of a building and place.

13.2 Buildings and the spaces around them should be thought about holistically, with the landscape and public realm being as important as the building itself. Successful landscape design will integrate development into its surroundings and enhance the function, character and amenity value of spaces and boundaries. Taking account of existing landscape features, such as trees, is crucial in creating high quality and responsive schemes. Existing trees can provide a sense of maturity to new developments and play an important role in softening and integrating development into the district. Landscape design extends beyond the curtilage of new buildings to include streets, parks and other open spaces and should help to support an attractive and high quality public realm. This policy does not seek to control the design of individual gardens unless these are a key part of a heritage asset.

13.3 Landscape proposals should result in high quality amenity spaces, which receive adequate sunlight (in accordance with best practice guidance) and which work with the buildings to help define thresholds and boundaries and to provide opportunities for private usable amenity space through gardens, roof terraces and balconies.

13.4 Maintenance and management plans must be provided with any proposals and considered early in the design process. Species that support local distinctiveness, enhance biodiversity and cope with climatic changes will also be sought.

13.5 The function of a building is a major determinant of its built form. However, a principal aim in designing new development should be to respect and complement the merits of existing built and natural features including landscape, while still expressing and accommodating the function of the building through design.

13.6 Some buildings (e.g. public buildings) need to be of larger scale than others. However, the scale and proportion of existing development should generally be respected. It may be possible to break down the bulk of a large building (e.g. by insertion of horizontal design features) to achieve a satisfactory appearance in relation to adjoining plot widths and proportions and to break bland expanses down to a scale sympathetic to that of existing buildings.

13.7 Density is a measure of the number of dwellings which can be accommodated on a site or in an area and can affect the appearance and characteristics of development in the following of ways:

13.8 Some parts of Thanet are already densely developed. Former holiday areas such as Cliftonville have seen significant numbers of conversions of large buildings (often previously used as hotels) into flatted accommodation which has, in some cases, had a detrimental impact due to small, poor quality developments, absent landlords, and a transient population. Other areas of the district benefit from lower density developments. The density of residential developments is not prescribed in this Plan, as, in all instances, the compatibility with the character of the area and the mix of housing to meet local needs or demand will influence design and layout.

13.9 The National Planning Policy Framework states that local planning authorities should consider policies to resist inappropriate development of residential gardens where development would cause harm to the local area.

13.10 In Thanet, applications have been refused for development on garden land due to the impact the proposal would have on the character and appearance of the area. Some parts of the district enjoy a high quality environment, with spacious surroundings, and development within a garden could have a detrimental effect. Residential gardens also form part of Thanet’s green infrastructure providing biodiversity and wildlife habitats. However, there could also be instances where a development within a garden could be in keeping with the pattern of develolpment, forms part of a comprehensive development, enhances the streetscene, or is situated where the property would be a frontage development.

The following policy seeks to ensure all new development respects and enhance local character.

Policy QD01 - General design principles

The primary planning aim in all new development is to promote or reinforce the local character of the area and provide high quality and inclusive design and be sustainable in all other respects. Development must:

1) Relate to the surrounding development, form and layout and strengthen links to the adjacent areas

2) Be well designed, respect and enhance the character, context and identity of its location; particularly in scale, massing, rhythm and use of materials appropriate to the locality

3) Be of a density, layout, scale, mass and design appropriate to the development itself and compatible with neighbouring buildings and spaces

4) Incorporate a high degree of permeability for pedestrians and cyclists, consider access for public transport and provide safe and satisfactory means of pedestrian and vehicle access including provision for disabled access

5) Improve people’s quality of life by creating safe and accessible environments, and promoting public safety and security.

Residential development on garden land will be permitted if it will make a positive visual contribution to the area, the intrinsic value of the site as an open space is not considered worthy of retention, and will not conflict with any other requirements of other design policies.

External spaces, landscape, public realm, and boundary treatments must be designed as an integral part of new development proposals and coordinated with adjacent sites and phases. Development will be supported where it is demonstrated that:

6) existing features including trees, natural habitats, boundary treatments and historic street furniture and/or surfaces that positively contribute to the quality and character of an area are should be retained and protected where appropriate

7) an integrated approach is taken to surface water management as part of the overall design,

8) a coordinated approach is taken to the design and siting of street furniture, boundary treatments, lighting, signage and public art,

9) trees and other planting is incorporated, appropriate to both the scale of buildings and the space available

Living conditions

13.11 The increasing dominance of private housing and policies to maximise use of land have caused concern about homes having levels of “liveable” space. The Council intends to prepare supplementary guidance to promote high quality inclusive design covering internal space standards and additional relevant considerations such as garden space, refuse and cycle storage. It will also maintain a supplementary planning document setting out guidelines and standards for conversion of buildings to quality flats where such accommodation is acceptable.

13.12 It is important that sufficient homes are built or adapted to provide the flexibility to accommodate a range of life stages including for occupants with limited mobility and energy. Lifetime Homes Standards provide a set of simple features to make homes more flexible and functional for all.

13.13 There are opportunities to facilitate meetings between members of the community who might not otherwise come into contact with each other, including through mixed-use developments, strong neighbourhood centres and active street frontages which bring together those who work, live and play in the vicinity. Safe and accessible developments with clear and legible pedestrian routes and high quality open space will also help achieve this by encouraging the active and continual use of public areas.

13.14 Thanet suffers higher crime rates than the average for Kent. Section 17 of the Crime and Disorder Act 1998 places a duty on councils to do all they reasonably can to reduce crime and disorder locally and improve people’s quality of life as a result.

13.15 Design can help achieve a safer environment including in the following ways:

Policy QD02 - Living Conditions

All new development should:

1) Be compatible with neighbouring buildings and spaces and not lead to the unacceptable living conditions through overlooking, noise or vibration, light pollution, overshadowing, loss of natural light or sense of enclosure.

2) Be of appropriate size and layout with sufficient usable space to facilitate comfortable living conditions.

3) Residential development should include the provision of private or shared external amenity space/play space.

4) Provide for clothes drying facilities and waste disposal or dustbin storage, with a collection point for storage containers no further than 15 metres from where the collection vehicle will pass.

Advertisements

13.16 Some advertisements need advertisement consent, and it is important that they are controlled through planning policy as they can form an integral part of the streetscene providing gaiety and colour, or they can be alien, intrusive and discordant. It is also important to make sure that they are not a danger to the public or highway safety. It is particularly important to consider their impact when they are located in conservation areas.

 

Policy QD03 - Advertisements

Applications for advertisements will be considered in relation to their effects upon amenity and public safety. Regard will be paid to the surrounding location, manner of illumination (if proposed), material composition, design and relationship to the land, building or structure to which they are to be affixed. Advertisements should not dominate but should be in balance with the character, townscape and architecture of the buildings on which they are situated. Regard should be paid to the proximity of any listed buildings or structures, and any impact to their setting.

In and adjoining conservation areas the Council will require that the design and siting of advertisements does not detract from, and preferably makes a positive contribution to, the character and/or appearance of the area.

Telecommunications

13.17 The National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) states that when preparing local plans, local planning authorities should support the expansion of electronic communications networks, including telecommunications and high speed broadband.

13.18 Mobile communications are now considered an integral part of the success of most business operations and individual lifestyles. With the growth of services such as mobile internet access, demand for new telecommunications is continuing to grow. The council is keen to facilitate this expansion whilst at the same time minimising any environmental impacts. It is the Council's aim to reduce the proliferation of new masts by encouraging mast sharing and siting equipment on existing tall structures and buildings.

Policy QD04 – Telecommunications

Proposals for telecommunications development will be permitted provided that the following criteria are met.

1) The siting and appearance of the proposed apparatus and associated structures should seek to minimise impact on the visual amenity, character and appearance of the surrounding area.

2) If on a building, apparatus and associated structures should be sited and designed to minimise impact to the external appearance of the host building.

3) If proposing a new mast, it should be demonstrated that the applicant has explored the possibility of erecting apparatus on existing buildings, masts or other structures. Such evidence should accompany any application made to the Council.

4) If proposing development in a sensitive area, the development should not have an unacceptable effect on areas of ecological interest, areas of landscape importance, archaeological sites, conservation areas or buildings of architectural or historic interest.

When considering applications for telecommunications development, the Council will have regard to the operational requirements of telecommunications networks and the technical limitations of the technology.


 

14 - Heritage

Archaeology

14.1 Thanet, the former island located at the north eastern point of Kent and in close proximity to continental Europe, has long been a gateway to new settlers, ideas, trade and custom into Britain and on the frontline of invasion and defence. Some of the great events in the nation’s early history have taken place in or close to Thanet including the arrival of the Romans, Anglo-Saxons and Christianity. The result is an incredible wealth of archaeological remains throughout the Island dating from earliest prehistoric times to the present day. Across Thanet’s towns, villages and countryside, archaeological investigation is regularly making new discoveries of remains that are of regional and national importance and that in many cases exhibit a character that is unique to the former island. The archaeology of Thanet stands comparison with any area of the country.

14.2 Much of Thanet’s archaeology lies shallowly buried beneath the plough soils of the island’s agricultural lands. Here aerial photography and top soil stripping ahead of major infrastructure and other development works has in recent years revealed extensive buried archaeological landscapes, particularly of prehistoric, Roman and Anglo-Saxon date, that are changing our understanding of settlement and other activities at those times. Within the towns and villages, as well as remains of these earlier periods are often found remains, sometimes more deeply buried, associated with the medieval development of the settlements and extending through their periods of growth and industrial development to their 19th and 20th century prominence. Elsewhere across Thanet can be found buried and standing remains associated with the defence of the coast and the airfield at Manston, the industrial heritage of the area and the development of the historic landscape. Much of this rich archaeological resource is particularly vulnerable to new development both in undeveloped and brownfield sites.

14.3 It is not possible for this summary for the Local Plan to provide a comprehensive overview of the archaeology of Thanet however particular themes particularly relevant for land-use planning are:

14.4 In response to their likely potential impact on important archaeological remains, the Council considers it essential for new development proposals to assess and understand the effect that they may have on the significance of archaeological remains whether known or as yet undiscovered. The following policy therefore applies:

Policy HE01 – Archaeology

Thanet’s heritage is a valuable and irreplaceable resource. The Council will promote the identification, recording, protection and enhancement of archaeological sites, monuments and historic landscape features, and will seek to encourage and develop their educational, recreational and tourist potential through management and interpretation

Developers should submit information with the planning application that allows an assessment of the impact of the proposal on the significance of the heritage asset. Where appropriate the Council may require the developer to provide additional information in the form of a desk-based or field assessment. Planning permission will be refused without adequate assessment of the archaeological implications of the proposal.

Development proposals adversely affecting the integrity or setting of Scheduled Monuments or other heritage assets of comparable significance will normally be refused.

Where the case for development which would affect an archaeological site is accepted by the Council, preservation in situ of archaeological remains will normally be sought. Where this is not possible or not justified, appropriate provision for investigation and recording will be required. The fieldwork should define:

(a) The character, significance, extent and condition of any archaeological deposits or structures within the application site;

(b) The likely impact of the proposed development on these features;

(c) The means of mitigating the effect of the proposed development

Recording should be carried out by an appropriately qualified archaeologist or archaeological contractor and may take place in advance of and during development. No work shall take place until a specification for the archaeological work has been submitted and approved by the Council. Arrangements must also be in place for any necessary post-excavation assessment, analysis and publication of the results, and deposition of the archive in a suitable, accessible repository.

 

Development in Conservation Areas

14.5 Conservation areas are designated by the Council where there is a valued distinctive character which the Council considers deserve special protection. Key elements of a conservation area include the architectural design or historic interest of buildings; the materials, colour and texture; the contribution of green and open spaces; street patterns and spaces between buildings; and views in and out of the area. The Council will review the boundaries of existing conservation areas and will consider the designation of new conservation areas as necessary and as resources allow.

14.6 The Council will not permit development which fails to retain those essential features upon which the character of a Conservation Area depends. These features may include natural features, trees, hedges, walls, fences, open areas and ground surfaces, as well as buildings and groups of buildings.

14.7 The character of Conservation Areas depends on the relationship of buildings to each other and their settings, in the local and wider context. The first step in the design process must, therefore, be an appraisal of the qualities of the area and the opportunity to reflect and improve on them. Such an appraisal should be submitted as part of a planning application.

14.8 Particular attention should be paid to conserving attractive views out of and into the area, including those from more distant or higher vantage points. Opportunities should be taken to improve views that detract from the appearance of the area.

Policy HE02 - Development in Conservation Areas

Within Conservation Areas, development proposals which preserve or enhance the character or appearance of the area, and accord with other relevant Policies of this Plan, will be permitted, provided that:

Proposals for New Buildings

1) they respond sympathetically to the historic settlement pattern, plot sizes and plot widths, open spaces, , streetscape, trees and landscape features,

2)they respond sympathetically to their setting, context and the wider townscape, including views into and out of conservation areas

3) the proportions of features and design details should relate well to each other and to adjoining buildings,

4) walls, gates and fences are, as far as possible, of a kind traditionally used in the locality,

5) conserve or enhance the significance of all heritage assets, their setting and the wider townscape, including views into and out of conservation areas

6) demonstrate a clear understanding of the significance of heritage assets and of their wider context,

Proposals for Extensions

7) the character, scale and plan form of the original building are respected and the extension is subordinate to it and does not dominate principal elevations,

8) appropriate materials and detailing are proposed and the extension would not result in the loss of features that contribute to the character or appearance of the Conservation Area.

New development which would detract from the immediate or wider landscape setting of any part of a Conservation Area will not be permitted.

Local Heritage Assets

14.9 Local heritage assets, including buildings, structures, features and gardens of local interest, are an important element of the rich history of the city and reinforce local distinctiveness and sense of place. The National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) requires local planning authorities to have an up-to- date understanding of the local historic environment and its significance. Although not likely to meet the current criteria for statutory listing, local heritage assets are important to their locality by reason of their cultural, architectural and historical contribution.

14.10The retention of local heritage assets may be achieved through appropriate adaptive re-use or change of use.

14.11 Building Regulations will allow a more flexible approach to meeting the required standards when altering buildings of local interest.

14.12 Unlike statutory Listed Buildings or Registered Parks and Gardens, Local Designated Asset status does not put any extra planning constraints on a property; rather it would be a material consideration if a development was proposed (i.e. the historical and architectural quality of the building would be taken into consideration). In addition, is it intended that the Locally Designated Asset Register will raise the profile of and give recognition to the buildings, parks, etc. that are of special importance to Thanet.

14.13 The NPPF supports the introduction of Locally Designated Heritage Assets and heritage best practice encourages further support to this important Local designation by the introduction of Article 4 (2)’s to all Locally Designated single dwellings within a conservation area.

14.14 Authorised works to single dwellings are permitted under article 3 of the Town and County (General Permitted Development) Order 1995 as amended by the Town and County Planning General Permitted Development (Amendment) Order 2008 which came into force from 1st October 2008.

14.15 Many of these small scale permitted development works such as the replacement of as built timber windows and doors with plastic in modern styles can significantly harm the character and appearance of historic buildings and areas.

14.16 When a building is Statutory Listed this problem is avoided by the requirement for listed building consent. In the case of unlisted buildings (even those locally listed) article 3 of the General Permitted Development Order allows a vast range of works to be carried out without the need to apply for planning permission.

14.17 Within conservation areas permitted development rights are more limited than elsewhere but even so those works can still degrade the character of individual buildings as a result of inappropriate changes.

14.18 A local planning authority can restrict the permitted development rights of property owners to carry out certain categories of development that would otherwise be automatically allowed through the making of an article 4 direction. These directions can be made to cover one or more properties and they can restrict one or more classes of development.

14.19 The effect of an Article 4(2) Direction is not that development within the particular class in Schedule 2 of the General Permitted Development Orders can not be carried out but simply that it is no longer automatically permitted, but instead must be subject to a specific planning application (of which there is no fee). This does not necessarily mean that the local planning authority will refuse permission for the works but it does enable the authority to retain some control over the design and detailing of the proposed development and to grant permission subject to appropriate conditions. The introduction of these directions is not intended to prevent all change, but rather to manage the way building and landscape alterations are carried out.

14.20 Before undertaking any works to a designated heritage asset, the significance of that asset must be clearly understood, as well as the potential impact of the development. Where listed buildings are concerned, it is important to address the full impact of modern building standards concerning aspects such as fire prevention, sound and thermal insulation, energy-efficiency savings and disabled access. Pre-application meetings are strongly recommended to ensure that standards can be accommodated without jeopardising the special interest of the building. Applicants considering works to a listed building are also advised to consult best practice guidance.

Policy HE03 - Local Heritage Assets

The Council supports the retention of local heritage assets, including buildings, structures, features and gardens of local interest. Local Heritage assets will be identified in a Local List as part of the Heritage Strategy.

Once adopted where permission is required, proposals will be permitted where they retain the significance, appearance, local distinctiveness, character or setting of a local heritage asset.

Historic Parks and Gardens

14.21 Thanet has a number of important parks; gardens, planned squares, cemeteries and churchyards. These areas provide significant amenity areas for the immediate environs and support and enhance the setting of significant designated and non-designated heritage assests. Parks and gardens of particular historical importance are listed by English Heritage in a Register of Historic Parks and Gardens - Albion Place Gardens in Ramsgate is included in this register. Kent County Councils Historic Environment Record also includes a number of important gardens and urban spaces locally.

14.22 Planned parks such as Ellington Park and Dane Park were opened to the public in 1898 and include features such as ornate bandstands and fountains. Less formal areas include grounds to substantial historic houses such as George V in Ramsgate (former residence of Sir Moses Montefiore), Pierremont Park and Northdown Park. The cemetries at Margate and Ramsgate include a selection of fine memorials, cemetery buildings and mature trees.

14.23 Planned squares are evident within the towns and are typically set pieces subordinate to buildings. Examples include Hawley Square in Margate and Vale Square in Ramsgate where high quality amenity space is closely related to the setting of listed buildings with a high degree of openness and permeability.

14.24 Both registered and non-registered parks and gardens are important because of their design or design history, the plants they contain; their historic significance; or their relationship with adjacent buildings and structures. In many cases, the designed open space is an important element of the design of the surrounding built environment. The Council will resist changes that would harm the character or setting of important parks and gardens, important plant material (particularly trees), views and other features.

In recognising the importance of these heritage assets the following policy applies.

Policy HE04 - Historic Parks and Gardens

Planning permission will not be granted for any development that will adversely affect the visual, historical or horticultural character of an historic park or garden or its setting, whether or not it is included on the statutory register

Works to a heritage asset to address climate change

14.25 The Council is committed to tackling climate change and reducing the carbon emissions of Thanet. At the same time, the Council is committed to conserving the Thanet's historic environment, particularly preserving and enhancing the character and appearance of its heritage assets. The Council’s aim, therefore, is to ensure a balanced approach between protecting the heritage assets of Thanet and ensuring that they contribute to tackling climate change and reducing the carbon emissions of the district.

14.26 Due to the nature of construction of historic buildings, it would be difficult to match the performance of modern structures. However, vernacular design and traditional construction have evolved over time and deal with local conditions. Adaptive re-use of a building gives significant carbon savings in terms of embodied energy in the fabric of the building, so the focus will be on enhancing the performance of traditional buildings as much as practicable without damaging their significance. Minimal intervention will be required, along with assurance that the works do not harm the building’s integrity or significance.

14.27 Planning applications will need to demonstrate a thorough understanding of the building in question via the submission of the following information:

14.28 Prior to looking at alternative means of generating energy, it is important to investigate and put into practice all possible means of conserving energy (hierarchical approach). The Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers’ guidance on building services in historic buildings sets out four principal aims when seeking to enhance the sustainability of heritage assets:

Policy HE05 - Works to a heritage asset to address climate change

Proposals to enhance the environmental performance of heritage assets will be supported where a sensitive and hierarchical approach to design and specification ensures that the significance of the asset is not compromised by inappropriate interventions.

Any works should be undertaken based on a thorough understanding of the building’s performance.


 

15 - Climate Change

15.1 Adaptation is an essential part of addressing the impacts and opportunities created by our changing climate. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) defines adaptation as:

“adjustments in natural or human systems in response to actual or expected climatic stimuli or their effects, which moderate harm or exploit beneficial opportunities”.

Fluvial and Tidal Flooding

15.2 Flooding has become a significant issue and the NPPF states that inappropriate development in areas at risk of flooding should be avoided by directing development away from areas at highest risk, but without increasing the risk of flooding elsewhere. This is known as the ‘Sequential Test’ and is accompanied by an ‘Exception Test’ to be applied where necessary.

15.3 Thanet has few areas of low lying land that are at risk of flooding from the sea. The two primary sources of flooding in the district are fluvial and tidal; fluvial flooding from the Wantsum Channel, and tidal flooding from extreme tide levels. The majority of development proposed in this Plan has been directed away from the identified Flood Risk Areas.

15.4 The densely populated Old Town area of Margate falls within an area of low lying land. The financial cost of damage to property in the Old Town area resulting from a major flooding event could be as much as £70m. Such a flooding event could also put the safety of residents and the public at risk. Recent flood defense works have significantly reduced this risk.

15.5 Areas at risk of flooding are shown on the flood maps on the Environment Agency’s website and are updated regularly – www.environment-agency.gov.uk.

The following policy seeks to ensure that development is not put at risk by flooding.

Policy CC01 – Fluvial and Tidal Flooding

The sequential test and exception test as set out in the NPPF will be applied to applications for development within identified flood risk areas. Development proposals in these areas will need a Flood Risk Assessment to be carried out by the developer.

Surface Water Management

15.6 Management of surface water is important in terms of reducing the risk of pollutants draining into the groundwater and bathing waters, and reducing the risk of surface water flooding.

15.7 The Thanet Surface Water Management Plan 2013 assessed historic flooding incidents, and identifies the causes of this flooding as surface water, sewer, tidal or blocked drains or gullys. SWMPs identify areas which may be vulnerable to surface water flooding as a result of flooding occurring elsewhere (eg excessive drainage into a site from flooding occurring further along a watercourse). An Action Plan has been developed which highlights tidally sensitive areas where action is needed, and the type of action that is considered necessary.

15.8 The following actions are identified for Thanet District Council, which could be achieved through the planning process:

15.9 SUDS are designed to efficiently and sustainably drain surface water, while minimising pollution. Surface water runoff in built up areas tends to flow rapidly into the sewer system, which places a burden on the sewerage network and increases flood risk downstream as piped systems have limited capacity. SUDS can slow the rate at which water disperses, thus reducing the risk of flooding.

SUDS are more sustainable than traditional drainage methods because they:

15.10 Applications to incorporate SUDS must be made to Kent County Council as the SUDS Approving Body (SAB). This includes the design, construction, operation and maintenance details of a drainage system to manage surface water which demonstrates compliance with the SuDS national standards. Developers are encouraged to agree all details with the SAB before submitting an application to the SAB. Kent County Council is preparing guidance on the process from the application to adoption of SUDS.

Methods of providing SUDS are described in the Climate Change Topic Paper.

15.11 Infiltration methods are unlikely to be appropriate in some parts of Thanet due to the quality of the groundwater. Groundwater from the chalk rock beneath Thanet is used to supply water for drinking water, agriculture, horticulture and industry. It also feeds the springs that emerge along the coast and near the marshes. The groundwater is extremely vulnerable to contamination as substances (natural substances and man-made chemicals) are able to pass rapidly through the thin soils and the natural fissures (cracks) in the chalk rock to the groundwater below the ground surface. The acceptability and construction details of infiltration devices is not only based on whether the site is in a Source Protection Zone, it also depends on whether the ground conditions are suitable (i.e. free from contamination) and if there are adequate unsaturated area to help reduce any discharge. Proposals for infiltration methods within the Groundwater Protection Zone should be discussed with the Environment Agency as it may be possible for SUDS to be lined, or for water to be treated prior to infiltration.

15.12 Under the Water Framework Directive (WFD), the Kent Isle of Thanet Groundwater Body has been classified as poor status for the groundwater quality and quantity.The groundwater is impacted by nitrates, pesticides, solvents and hydrocarbons at levels that are of concern.

15.13 The quality of the groundwater also has an impact on Thanets bathing waters. Thanet has 13 beaches which have been designated as ‘Bathing Waters’ under the Bathing Water Directive which aims to protect public health and the environment from pollution. Thanet has received eight blue flag awards for its beaches in 2013 for reaching the ‘Excellent’ standard required under the new EU Bathing Water Directive. In addition to this Thanet has been awarded two Seaside Awards for Ramsgate Main Sands and Viking Bay, Broadstairs, which recognises and rewards beaches in England that achieve the highest standards of beach management and, in the case of bathing beaches, meet guideline water quality. There are also 2 shellfish waters designated under the EU Shellfish Waters Directive.

15.14 Bathing waters can be nominated for designation or delisting from the designations list in the annual DEFRA review.

15.15 Walpole Bay has previously failed to meet current EC mandatory bathing water standards and is therefore considered to be at significant risk of not meeting the revised Bathing Water Regulations.

The following factors could contribute to poor bathing water quality in Thanet:

15.16 As well as pollution by the water industry from sewer system overflows or failures,the quality of bathing water quality can be affected by pollution that arises from a very varied number of sources. Diffuse pollution, from agricultural or other sources, can run off land or percolate through it in to rivers which drain into the sea. The amount of pollution from individual sources may be small but the combined effect can be significant. Water draining from farms and farmland into rivers can contain faecal material coming directly from livestock or indirectly from either the poor storage of manure or poor practices in the application of manure on to land. Non-agricultural diffuse pollution arises from a variety of sources including: wrong connections of waste water from houses and businesses into surface water drainage; road runoff containing animal faeces reaching water courses and septic tanks polluting rivers.

15.17 The loss of blue flags or the failure of any of Thanet’s beaches to meet the requirements of the revised Bathing Water regulations or for Shellfish water failure could have knock-on implications on perception of water quality at neighbouring beaches as well as the local economy and tourist and fishing industry. To ensure development does not negatively impact bathing and shellfish water quality it is important to ensure drainage infrastructure is adequate i.e. sewer capacity is available (or financially viable to increase) and surface water drainage is managed.

The following policy seeks to ensure surface water run-off is management appropriately.

Policy CC02 – Surface Water Management

New development will be expected to manage surface water resulting from the development using sustainable drainage systems wherever possible. SUDS design should be considered as an integral part of the masterplanning and design process for new development.

Proposals for SUDS at sites within the Groundwater Protection Zone as shown on Map 19, or sites near the Groundwater Protection Zone, must demonstrate that the methods used will not cause detriment to the quality of the groundwater.

Sites identified as a Tidally Sensitive Area (as identified in surface water management plans) will need to incorporate Sustainable Drainage Methods and a maintenance schedule where appropriate, at the design stage of a planning application, and a Flood Risk Assessment will be required before planning permission can be granted.

Coastal Development

15.18 There are a number of other discreet areas of flood risk around the coastline; however, the majority of coastline is at risk of erosion and not flooding. Coastal defences have an approximate lifeline of 50 years. If there appears to be an economic justification for maintaining them then they will be; however, feasibility work does not always indicate that the project will be successful in achieving funding, and in such cases defences may cease to be maintained.

15.19 The Isle of Grain to South Foreland Shoreline Management Plan (SMP) provides a large-scale assessment of the risks associated with coastal evolution and presents a policy framework to address these risks to people and the developed, historic and natural environment in a sustainable manner. It also includes an action plan to facilitate implementation of the SMP policies and monitor progress.

The following seeks to ensure that new development is not put at risk from coastal erosion,

Policy CC03 – Coastal Development

Proposals for new development within 40 metres of the coastline or clifftop must demonstrate to the satisfaction of the Council that it will not:

1) expose people and property to the risks of coastal erosion and flooding, or

2) accelerate coastal erosion due to increased surface water run off before planning permission can be granted.

Sustainable Design

15.20 The design of a building or development can help adapt to climate change by increasing solar gain and reducing winter heat loss.

15.21 The Code for Sustainable Homes is the current national standard for the sustainable design and construction of new homes. The Code aims to reduce carbon emissions and create homes that are more sustainable. There are 6 Code levels which new developments can aim to achieve. This relates to the minimum percentage reduction in emissions; Level 1 is a 10% reduction and Level 6 would be a Zero Carbon home.

The Code for Sustainable Homes levels are set out in Table 8 below.

Table 8 - Code for Sustainable Homes 

Level

% energy efficiency higher than Part L1A of the Building Regulations

Daily water usage (litres)per person

1

10

120

2

18

120

3

25

105

4

44

105

5

100

80

6

Zero carbon

80

Source: www.gov.uk

15.22 The requirements to provide these could have an impact on the viability of development in Thanet. The council commissioned a Whole Plan Viability Study to ensure that policies in the local plan and development in Thanet remain viable. The study assumes build costs to current building regulations and an additional uplift of £2,550 per unit to accommodate CSH Level 5 on water resources management.

15.23 Government has consulted on a review of Housing Standards to rationalise the large number of codes, standards, rules, regulations and guidance currently used by different authorities and provide new national standards. This included a review of the Code for Sustainable Homes. The national standards, when published, will replace the Code for Sustainable Homes.

15.24 Government has also consulted on new building regulations as part of their Zero Carbon Homes Policy which will increase the energy efficiency of buildings and is expected to come into force this year. The new regulations aim to introduce zero carbon standards from 2016 for homes, and by 2019 for non domestic buildings by:

15.25 There are measures that can be taken in the design of new development that will help reduce energy consumption and provide resilience to increased temperatures, such as:

15.26 Landscaping can be particularly beneficial as it can provide stepping stones, wildlife corridors or new habitats, and contribute to Thanet's green infrastructure network. In terms of adapting to climate change, integrating vegetation (i.e. planting on building walls and roofs) can help to reduce solar gain as vegetation has a much higher reflective capacity than masonry, as well as providing a cooling effect through evapo-transpiration. Planting can also help mitigate against poor air quality by presenting a large surface area for filtering air. A large tree can deliver the same cooling capacity as five large air conditioning units running for 20 hours a day during hot weather. New planting can help provide more comfortable, cooler spaces via summer shading.

15.27 Within the context of an established development pattern, the most significant change likely to generate demand for travel will result from new housing development. It is necessary, therefore, to consider the location of development in areas accessible to a range of services on foot and by public transport, preventing urban sprawl and improving local high streets and town centres. Methods such as providing showers and changing facilities in employment related development and locating cycle parking close to town centres/entrances will also help reduce the need to travel by car.

The following policy seeks to ensure that new development achieves the necessary levels of sustainable design and construction.

Policy CC04 – Sustainable Design

All new buildings and conversions of existing buildings must be designed to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases and function in a changing climate. All developments will be required to:

1) achieve a high standard of energy efficiency in line with most recent government guidance;

2) make the best use of solar energy passive heating and cooling, natural light, natural ventilation and landscaping

All new buildings and conversions of existing buildings must be designed to use resources sustainably. This includes, but is not limited to:

3) re-using existing buildings and vacant floors wherever possible;

4) designing buildings flexibly from the outset to allow a wide variety of possible uses;

5) using sustainable materials wherever possible and making the most sustainable use of other materials;

6) minimising waste and promoting recycling, during both construction and occupation

New developments must provide safe and attractive cycling and walking opportunities to reduce the need to travel by car.

Renewable energy installations

15.28 There is a number of options for obtaining energy from renewable sources in new or existing developments. These include:

The following policy seeks to encourage the use of renewable energy installations in new and existing development whilst mitigating against any detrimental effects.

 

 

Policy CC05 – Renewable energy installations

Proposals for renewable energy installations incorporated in new developments or existing buildings will be permitted, subject to there being no unacceptable detrimental visual or environmental impact.

 

District Heating

15.29 District heating schemes supply heat from a central source directly to homes and businesses through a network of pipes carrying hot water. This means that individual homes and business do not need to generate their own heat on site.

15.30 Large energy users, or ‘anchor loads’ are an essential part of a district heating network to provide a base heat demand that will allow a system to run efficiently. Anchor loads could be large energy users such as industry, schools, hospitals or leisure centres with heated swimming pools. Map 17 is a heat map for Thanet showing potential areas suitable for District Heating.

Map 17 - Thanet's Heat Density

Description: Heat map for thanet

15.31 District heating is most suitable where there is a high density of built development, and especially where there is a mix of building types. (The high heat density shown outside the urban boundary is the airport.)This diversity of energy demand helps to keep combined heat and power (CHP) or boiler plant running in a more steady state for longer – which is more efficient.

15.32 The Renewable Energy for Kent report identifies the following scale and types of district heating networks which may come forward:

Small local networks: Typically between 10 and 50 homes in a street or a block. Gas fired boilers or biomass boilers supplying heat only

Medium size networks: Typically over 200 homes and normally with an ‘anchor building’ (i.e. a school, hospital or leisure centre)

Large networks – A number of small and medium sized networks linked up and perhaps taking heat from a large biomass or energy from waste power station

The following policy seeks to encourage District Heating schemes where appropriate and feasible.

Policy CC06 – District Heating

Support will be given to the inclusion of district heating schemes in new development. Major development proposals should be supported by an Energy Statement to demonstrate why district heating can or cannot be delivered.

Solar Parks

15.33 There have been a number of developments for renewable energy applications in the district to help reduce emissions.

15.34 A number of Solar Parks have been granted permission – these are mainly located in fields, or parts of fields, are temporary (most have a 25 year lifespan), and the land can revert to its original use when the panels are removed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Map 18 - Solar Parks

15.35 The siting for a solar farm will usually be near to a connection to the national grid due to cost implications for connection, and will require the erection of a fence surrounding the site for security reasons.

15.36 Map 18 shows sites where permission has been granted for solar parks. It may be possible that other sites could be considered for further development of solar parks. Further sites should be located on previously developed land or non-agricultural land wherever possible.There are potential negative impacts to the countryside, landscapes, and to best and most versatile agricultural land. For proposals on agricultural land, the developer will be expected to demonstrate how the land can still be used for agricultural purposes. The developer will be required to outline a management programme to demonstrate that the areas beneath and around the panels will not become overgrown, and to assist with the eventual restoration of the site, normally to its former use.

15.37 The developer will be required to outline a management programme to demonstrate that the areas beneath and around the panels will not become overgrown, and to assist with the eventual restoration of the site, normally to its former use.

Policy CC07 – Solar Parks

Applications for solar parks will only be permitted if there is no significantly detrimental impact on any of the following:

1) Thanet's historic landscapes

2) Visual and local amenity, including cumulative effects

3) Heritage assets and views important to their setting

Proposals on agricultural land must demonstrate that the proposal will comply with all of the following:

5) Cause minimal disturbance to the agricultural land and

6) Be temporary, capable of removal and reversible, and allow for continued use as such on the remaining undeveloped area of the site.

8) Provide biodiversity enhancements.

The need for renewable energy does not automatically override environmental considerations.

15.38 The Richborough area, which straddles the district boundary with Dover, has become a focus for waste treatment, renewable and low carbon energy industries. The former Richborough Power Station provides a potential location for such facilities, as well as a connection to the national grid. Thanet and Dover Councils have approved applications for solar farms and anaerobic digesters in the surrounding area, and a peaking plant facility and site-wide infrastructure to facilitate the creation of energy from waste site, on the former Richborough Power Station site.

15.39 The Council recognises the potential of the site to help to mitigate against climate change. Therefore in liaison with Dover District Council and Kent County Council (as the Minerals and Waste Authority), the Council will continue to explore, with the promoters of any schemes, how this potential can be realised. Particular regard would need to be had to environmental, transport and wildlife impacts together with visual impact on landscape and on the gateway location to and from Thanet.

15.40 The emerging Kent Minerals and Waste Local Plan 2013-2030 and Waste Sites Plan look to this area as a potential location for energy from waste, green waste treatment and for the treatment/material recycling facilities. Development proposals in this area should also refer to these plans and the relevant National Planning Statements.

15.41 The Secretary Of State for Transport has issued directions under the Town and Country Planning (General Development Procedure) Order 1995 to safeguard the route corridor of the Channel Tunnel Rail Link Project. This includes additional land that may be required for associated works/development. (Such direction and works are not proposals of the District Council, and the routes in question will not be determined through the development plan process but through other statutory procedures which will provide appropriate opportunities for any objections by those directly affected by the project).

15.42 Safeguarding directions for development affecting the route corridor for the channel tunnel rail link project apply to land at Richborough. In accordance with the direction, the Council will consult HS1 (south) limited before granting planning permission or resolving to carry out/authorise development within the limit of land subject to consultation, featured on the Policies Map.

Policy CC08 – Richborough

Proposals for the development of renewable energy facilities at Richborough will be permitted if it can be demonstrated that the development will not be detrimental to nearby sites of nature conservation value, or that any potential effects will be fully mitigated.

 

 

 

 


 

16 - Safe and Healthy Environment

16.1 The National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) states that the planning system should contribute to and enhance the natural and local environment. It should prevent both new and existing development from contributing to or being put at unacceptable risk of pollution by soil, air water or noise or land instability, and remediate and mitigate despoiled, degraded, derelict contaminated and unstable land where appropriate. Consideration must be given to the impacts of noise on health and quality of life from new developments, and the presence of Air Quality Management Areas and the cumulative impacts on air quality from individual sites in local areas.

16.2 Environmental pollution and impacts on human health are important issues, and the council is keen to ensure that the environmental quality of the area is maintained and enhanced. The following policies aim to address a number of environmental issues to help achieve this.

Potentially Polluting Development

16.3 Activities with the potential to pollute are controlled by wide ranging powers under pollution control legislation. However, the effects of development that might cause the release of pollutants to water, land or air, or from noise, dust, vibration, light odour or heat, are material considerations when deciding whether or not to grant planning permission. The Council will require any application to contain sufficient information to enable the risk of pollution to be assessed.

Policy SE01 - Potentially Polluting Development

Development with potential to pollute will be permitted only where:

1) Applicable statutory pollution controls and siting will effectively and adequately minimise impact upon land use and the environment including the effects on health, the natural environment or general amenity resulting from the release of pollutants to water, land or air or from noise, dust, vibration, light odour or heat; and

In determining individual proposals, regard will be paid to:

2) The economic and wider social need for the development; and

3) The visual impact of measure needed to comply with any statutory environmental quality standards or objectives

Permission for development which is sensitive to pollution will be permitted only if it is sufficiently well separated from any existing or potential source of pollution as to reduce pollution impact upon health, the natural environment or general amenity to an acceptable level, and adequate safeguarding and mitigation on residential amenity.

Landfill Sites and Unstable Land

16.4 Sites that have been used for the deposit of refuse or waste may generate explosive or otherwise harmful gasses. Thanet has approximately 26 such sites which are all listed in the National Landfill Atlas held by the Environment Agency.

16.5 A former landfill site will be unlikely to be actively gassing after 40-50 years of its closure. The Council is required to consult the Environment Agency, as Waste Regulation Authority, before granting consent for development within 250m of land which is, or has within 30 years of the relevant application, been used for the deposit of refuse or waste.

16.6 If an application for a new development/redevelopment or major change of use on or adjacent to a site included on the landfill register (also known as the landfill atlas) is received, then a full site-investigation report including gas monitoring will be required.

16.7 Where the presence of gas is discovered or it is suspected that it may be present during site development, the Council will require the applicant to arrange for an investigation to be carried out to determine its source and for satisfactory and effective remedial measures to prevent hazards from migrating gas (including accumulation into property or other confined spaces) during the course of development and during subsequent use of the site. Specialist design and construction advice will usually have to be sought by the developer in this regard.

16.8 For development on unstable land, it may be necessary for the developer to carry out specialist investigations and assessments to determine the stability of the site proposed for development and identify any remedial measures that will be needed to deal with instability. Areas known to the Council where land instability is likely to be an issue include:

Policy SE02 - Landfill Sites and Unstable Land

In considering planning applications on or near landfill sites, or where there is otherwise reason to suspect that potential danger from evolving or migrating gas may be present, or on land for which known or suspected instability might render it unsuitable for development, the local planning authority may require a specialist site investigation and assessment by the developer to identify any remedial measures required to deal with it before determining such planning applications.

Development or redevelopment, including change of use, will only be permitted where:

1) the applicant/developer has demonstrated either that there is no unacceptable risk caused by the development or that appropriate remedial measures can overcome such risk;

2) the development would not adversely affect neighbouring land; and

3) any necessary remedial measures can be achieved without unacceptable environmental impact.

Where the local planning authority is satisfied that the risks from landfill or ground instability can be overcome, planning consent may be granted subject to conditions or a legal agreement specifying the necessary measures to be carried out.

Contaminated Land

16.9 Some sites in Thanet are known to be contaminated. The allocation of sites should not be taken as an indication that they are free from any hazardous/physical constraints, or that they are not in the vicinity of other instillations handling hazardous substances.

16.10 Development on contaminated land will require a site investigation and assessment to establish the levels of contamination present and identify any remedial measures to clean the site to make it suitable for its proposed end use.

16.11 A County-wide Contaminated Land Strategy is being prepared by the Kent & Medway Contaminated Land Forum and will form part of the evidence base for this local plan once it has been finalised. The strategy provides information across the county in place of former PPS23. The Council has a Contaminated Land Strategy for the district - this is currently being reviewed.

Policy SE03 - Contaminated Land

Development proposals that would enable contaminated sites to be brought into beneficial use will normally be permitted, so long as the sites can be rendered suitable for the proposed end use in terms of the impact on human health, public safety and the environment, including underlying groundwater resources.

Development on land known or suspected to be contaminated or likely to be adversely affected by such contamination will only be permitted where:

1) An appropriate site investigation and assessment (agreed by the local planning authority) has been carried out as part of the application to establish whether contamination is present and to identify any remedial measures necessary to ensure that the site is suitable for the proposed end use;

2) The proposed remedial measures would be acceptable in planning terms and would provide effective safeguards against contamination hazards during the development and subsequent occupation of the site.

Planning conditions will be attached to any consent to ensure that remedial measures are fully implemented.

In the case of sites where contamination is only considered to be a possible risk, a site investigation will be required by condition. Sites where contamination is believed to have been removed or where the full site history is unknown should not be able to be considered as contaminated land under Part 2A of the Environmental Protection Act 1990 in relation to the untended use of the land.

Groundwater Protection

16.12 Thanet’s groundwater is of poor quality and is vulnerable to contamination due to Thanet’s thin soils and cracks in the chalk rock, which means pollution would soak through quickly to the groundwater. However the groundwater is used to supply water for drinking water, agriculture, horticulture and industry and also feeds the springs that emerge along the coast near the marshes, so it is important that there is no further contamination to the groundwater.

Thanet’s groundwater zones are shown on map 19 below.

Map 19 - Thanet's Groundwater Protection Zones

Description: SPZ map wtih legend (2)

16.13 Thanet’s groundwater is extremely vulnerable to contamination as substances (natural substances and man-made chemicals) are able to pass rapidly through the thin soils and the natural fissures (cracks) in the chalk rock to the groundwater below the ground surface.

16.14 Once the chalk and groundwater is contaminated at a site by a substance it can take decades to clean-up. The Council and the Environment Agency have worked hard to prevent contamination by consistently applying Groundwater Protection policies to any proposed land-use changes in Thanet to reduce potential future impact.

16.15 Under the Water Framework Directive (WFD), the ‘Kent Isle of Thanet Groundwater Body’ has been classified as poor status for the groundwater quality and quantity. The groundwater is impacted by nitrates, pesticides, solvents and hydrocarbons at levels that are of concern. Thanet’s groundwater is currently a candidate Water Protection Zone (WPZ). These zones are used in areas identified as being at high risk as a ‘last resort’ when other mechanisms have failed or are unlikely to prevent failure of WFD objectives. WPZs are a new regulatory tool to address diffuse water pollution. They are designed to help enforce measures to prevent pollution and improve water quality where standards set out in the Water Framework Directive (WFD) are not being met. It is hoped that sufficient measures can be taken, by various organisations and individuals, that will help remediate the problems with Thanet’s groundwater and avoid a WPZ designation.

16.16 The poor groundwater quality cannot be attributed to just one source. In Thanet there are considerable risks to the groundwater from both urban and rural activities. These risks are intensified by the compact nature of the district. Hazards to Thanet’s groundwater include petrol stations, gas works, drainage from roads, drainage from the airport, leakage from sewers, pesticide storage, septic tanks, sheep dips, and farm buildings. Uses that can cause pollution to the groundwater include dry cleaners, mechanics, scrap metal, photo processing, and some sustainable drainage systems.

16.17 Some methods of Sustainable Drainage can cause detriment to the groundwater. Methods that include infiltration, where trenches are created underground so that water filtrates into the surrounding soil and is then transferred to a disposal unit, would not be appropriate in many parts of Thanet due to its thin soils and vulnerability of the groundwater. Proposals for infiltration methods within the Groundwater Protection Zone should be discussed with the Environment Agency as it may be possible for SUDS to be lined, or for water to be treated prior to infiltration. Some methods of sustainable drainage can help improve water quality by controlling the flow of water into the aquifer and enabling the groundwater to recharge.

Policy SE04 - Groundwater Protection

Proposals for development within the Groundwater Protection Zones identified on the proposals map will only be permitted if there is no risk of contamination to groundwater sources. If a risk is identified, development will only be permitted if adequate mitigation measures can be implemented.

Proposals for Sustainable Drainage systems involving infiltration must be assessed and discussed with the Environment Agency to determine their suitability in terms of the impact of any drainage into the groundwater aquifer.

Air Quality

16.18 Thanet generally has very good Air Quality; however there are areas at The Square in Birchington, the junction of Hereson Road/Boundary Road and High Street St Lawrence, Ramsgate where Air Quality is poor due to pollution from road transport.

16.19 An urban wide Air Quality Management Area has been declared to enable effective management of Air Quality.

16.20 The Council has an Air Quality Action Plan to address the Urban Air Quality Management Area (AQMA) that was declared in 2011 where Air Quality fails to meet required standards. The Action Plan considers a broad approach to strategic planning, transport planning, sustainability and climate change.

16.21 Planning is an effective tool to improve Air Quality. It can be used to locate development to reduce emissions overall, and reduce the direct impacts of new development, through policy requirements.

16.22 An AQMA makes consideration of the Air Quality impacts of a proposed development important. However, there is still a need to regard Air Quality as a material factor in determining planning applications in any location. This is particularly important where the proposed development is not physically within the AQMA, but could have adverse impacts on Air Quality within it, or where Air Quality in that given area is close to exceeding guideline objectives itself.

16.23 Developments that may require the submission of an Air Quality Assessment include the following:

1) If the development is likely to have a significant impact upon an AQMA

2) If the development has the potential to cause a deterioration in local air quality (i.e.once completed it will increase pollutant concentrations)

3) If the development is located in an area of poor air quality (i.e. it will expose future occupiers to unacceptable pollutant concentrations) whether the site lies within a Designated AQMA or, if so advised by the Local Authority, or a "candidate" AQMA

4)If the demolition/construction phase will have a significant impact on the local environment (e.g. through fugitive dust and exhaust emissions)

16.24 The types of development that are likely to require an air quality assessment are identified in the Kent and Medway Air Quality Partnerships Technical Planning Guide. These are listed in Appendix D Table 01.

Proposals for new residential development should, wherever possible and appropriate, include an electric car charging point.

Policy SE05 - Air Quality

All major development schemes should promote a shift to the use of sustainable low emission transport to minimise the impact of vehicle emissions on Air Quality, particularly within the designated Urban Air Quality Management Area. Development will be located where it is accessible to support the use of public transport, walking and cycling.

Development proposals that might lead to a significant deterioration in Air Quality or an exceedence of Air Quality national objectives or to a worsening of Air Quality within the urban Air Quality management area will require the submission of an Air Quality assessment, which should address:

1) The cumulative effect of further emissions;

2) The proposed measures of mitigation through good design and offsetting measures that would prevent the National Air Quality Objectives being exceeded or reduce the extent of the Air Quality deterioration. These will be of particular importance within the urban AQMA, associated areas and areas of lower Air Quality.

Proposals that fail to demonstrate these will not be permitted

Noise Pollution

16.25 The Governments Noise Policy Statement will be reflected in planning policy to ensure that noisy and noise-sensitive developments are located away from each other, and from residential or built up areas

16.26 Noise can constitute a statutory nuisance and is subject to the provisions of the Environmental Protection Act 1990.

16.27 The Government’s Noise Policy Statement for England stated priority is to:

Avoid significant adverse impacts on health and quality of life from environmental, neighbour and neighbourhood noise within the context of Government policy on sustainable development’.

16.28 The second aim is to mitigate and minimise adverse impacts, and the third is to contribute to the improvement of health and quality of life through effective management control of noise.

16.29 Noise is a material consideration when determining planning applications. The Governments National Planning Practice Guidance[i] states that consideration should be given to:

16.30 The guidance provides the following noise hierarchy to determine when noise could be a concern:

Table 9 - Noise Hierarchy 

Perception

Examples of outcomes

Increasing effect level

Action

Not noticeable

No effect

No observed effect

No specific measures required

Noticeable and not intrusive

Noise can be heard, but does not cause any change in behaviour or attitude. Can slightly affect the acoustic character of the area but not such that there is a perceived change in the quality of life.

No observed adverse effect

No specific measures required

Lowest Observed Adverse Effect Level

Noticeable and intrusive

Noise can be heard and causes small changes in behaviour and/or attitude, e.g. turning up volume of television; speaking more loudly; closing windows for some of the time because of the noise. Potential for non-awakening sleep disturbance. Affects the acoustic character of the area such that there is a perceived change in the quality of life.

Observed Adverse Effect

Mitigate and reduce to a minimum

Significant Observed Adverse Effect Level

Noticeable and disruptive

The noise causes a material change in behaviour and/or attitude, e.g. having to keep windows closed most of the time, avoiding certain activities during periods of intrusion. Potential for sleep disturbance resulting in difficulty in getting to sleep, premature awakening and difficulty in getting back to sleep. Quality of life diminished due to change in acoustic character of the area.

Significant Observed Adverse Effect

Avoid

Noticeable and very disruptive

Extensive and regular changes in behaviour and/or an inability to mitigate effect of noise leading to psychological stress or physiological effects, e.g. regular sleep deprivation/awakening; loss of appetite, significant, medically definable harm, e.g. auditory and non-auditory

Unacceptable Adverse Effect

Prevent

 

16.31 The guidance suggests four broad types of mitigation against noise:

Policy SE06 - Noise Pollution

In areas where noise levels are relatively high, permission will be granted for noise-sensitive development only where adequate mitigation is provided, and the impact of the noise can be reduced to acceptable levels.

Development proposals that generate significant levels of noise must be accompanied by a scheme to mitigate such effects, bearing in mind the nature of surrounding uses. Proposals that would have an unacceptable impact on noise-sensitive areas or uses will not be permitted.

Noise Action Plan Important Areas

16.32 Noise Action Plans have been prepared in line with the terms of the Environmental Noise Directive and cover noise from roads, railways and agglomerations. There are 26 road related ‘Important Areas’ and 2 rail Important Areas in Thanet. (These correspond with hotspots identified in the AQMA).

16.33 Within the identified areas, residential development will need to include mitigation measures to reduce the impact of noise on residential amenity. Such measures may include screening/barriers, double glazing, locating windows so they are not opposite the noise source. Developers should liaise with Kent County Council as the Highway Authority to agree appropriate mitigation.

 

 

Policy SE07 – Noise Action Plan Important Areas

Proposals for residential development within identified Important Areas in the Noise Action Plan must incorporate mitigation measures against the impact of noise on residential amenity.

 

Aircraft Noise and Noise Sensitive Development

16.34 The Council seeks to limit the effect of aircraft noise on sensitive development such as housing, schools and hospitals, by restricting locations where such development may be sited.

16.35 The 2006 Local Plan uses aircraft noise contours which were commissioned during the production of the Plan, and consider a range of high, medium and low traffic scenarios, including the possibility of increased aviation associated with the potential expansion of the airport.

16.36 There is currently a degree of uncertainty regarding future aircraft noise levels at the airport, therefore the Council will adopt a precautionary approach in relation to aircraft noise and will continue to apply the contour predictions which formed the basis for the previous Local Plan.

Map 20 - Aircraft Noise Contour Map

© Crown copyright and database rights 2014 Ordnance Survey 100018261
 
 Description: LP Appendix J Aircraft Noise Contour Map [Oct 06]

 

16.37 The Council will review this part of the Plan if new information regarding airport activity becomes available or revised contours are received.

16.38 For the purposes of the following policy, noise sensitive development/redevelopment includes, schools, hospitals, and any other use the function or enjoyment of which could, in the Council's opinion, be materially and adversely affected by noise

 

Policy SE08 – Aircraft Noise

Applications for noise sensitive development or redevelopment on sites likely to be affected by aircraft noise will be determined in relation to the latest accepted prediction of existing and foreseeable ground noise measurement of aircraft noise.

Applications for residential development will be determined in accordance with the following noise exposure categories.

Nec

Predicted aircraft noise levels (dbl aeq.0700-23.00)

A

<57

Noise will not be a determining factor

B

57-63

Noise will be taken into account in determining applications, and where appropriate, conditions will be imposed to ensure an adequate level of protection against noise (policy ep8 refers).

C

63-72

Planning permission will not be granted except where the site lies within the confines of existing substantially built-up area. Where residential development is exceptionally granted, conditions will be imposed to ensure an adequate level of protection against noise (policy ep8 refers).

D

>72

Residential development will not be permitted.

Applications for non-residential development including schools, hospitals and other uses considered sensitive to noise will not be permitted in areas expected to be subject to aircraft noise levels exceeding 60 db(a) unless the applicant is able to demonstrate that no alternative site is available. Proposals will be expected to demonstrate adequate levels of sound insulation where appropriate in relation to the particular use.

16.39 The provisions of the following policy will not apply to permissions relating to small extensions to existing houses provided:

  1. Permission for the construction of the house itself was not granted subject to the provisions of this Policy; or
  2. The extension is not intended to form a separate unit of living accommodation.

In such instances the sound insulation standards referred to in this Policy are brought to the attention of all applicants, but it is left to them whether they implement the standards within the new extension or not.

 

Policy SE09 – Aircraft Noise and Residential Development

When planning consent is granted for residential development on any land expected to be subject to a level of aircraft noise of above 57db(a)**, such consent will be subject to provision of a specified level of insulation to achieve a minimum level of sound attenuation in accordance with the following criteria:

 

NEC

Predicted Aircraft Minimum Noise Levels Attenuation required (dB(A) (frequency range 100-3150 Hz)

A

<57

No attenuation measures required

B

57-63

20dB

C

63-72

30dB

 

** LAeq 57dB 07.00-23.00


 

[i][i] http://planningguidance.planningportal.gov.uk/blog/guidance/noise/when-is-noise-relevant-to-planning/

Light Pollution

16.40 Light Pollution is identified as a statutory nuisance under the Clean Neighbourhoods and Environment Act 2005. Poorly designed or installed lighting can be obtrusive by introducing a suburban character into rural areas, and also wastes electricity. Different forms of Light Pollution are identified as:

16.41 Due to Thanet’s open landscapes and vast skies, poor outdoor lighting could have a substantial adverse effect on the character of the area well beyond the site on which the lighting is located.

16.42 Light Pollution should be included as a policy as inappropriate lighting has been shown to have major impacts on wildlife. The impacts of Light Pollution on bat species and potential mitigation measures are particularly well documented.

16.43 The Council refers to the Institute of Lighting Professionals Guidance Notes for the Reduction of Obtrusive Light[i]. The guidance identifies environmental zones and corresponding lighting environments as shown in table 10:

Table 10 - Environmental Zones 

Zone

Surrounding

Lighting Environment

ILP examples

Corresponding areas in Thanet

E0

Protected

Dark

UNESCO starlight reserves, IDA dark sky parks

None

E1

Natural

Intrinsically dark

National Parks, Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty etc

Landscape Character Areas at Pegwell Bay and former Wantsum Channel, the European Marine Sites

E2

Rural

Low district brightness

Village or relatively dark outer suburban locations

Rural areas outside of the built confines (excluding Manston airport)

E3

Suburban

Medium district brightness

Small town centres or suburban locations

Urban areas and villages

E4

Urban

High district brightness

Town/city centres with high levels of night time activity

Amusement area at Margate Seafront

 

The Institute of Lighting Professionals recommends the following standards within these areas:

Table 11- Obtrusive Light Limitations for Exterior Lighting Installations – General Observers

Environmental Zone

Sky Glow

ULR

[Max %](1)

Light Intrusion

(into Windows)

Ev [lux] (2)

Luminaire Intensity

I [candelas] (3)

Building Luminance

Pre-curfew (4)

Pre- curfew

Post- curfew

Pre- curfew

Post- curfew

Average,

L

E0

0

0

0

0

0

0

E1

0

2

0 ( 1*)

2,500

0

0

E2

2.5

5

1

7,500

500

5

E3

5.0

10

2

10,000

1,000

10

E4

15

25

5

25,000

2,500

25

 


ULR = Upward Light Ratio of the Installation is the maximum permitted percentage of luminaire flux that goes directly into the sky.

Ev = Vertical Illuminance in Lux - measured flat on the glazing at the centre of the window.

I = Light Intensity in Candelas (cd)

L = Luminance in Candelas per Square Metre (cd/m2)

Curfew = the time after which stricter requirements (for the control of obtrusive light) will apply; often a condition of use of lighting applied by the local planning authority. If not otherwise stated - 23.00hrs is suggested.

* = Permitted only from Public road lighting installations

1) Upward Light Ratio – Some lighting schemes will require the deliberate and careful use of upward light, e.g. ground recessed luminaires, ground mounted floodlights, festive lighting, to which these limits cannot apply. However, care should always be taken to minimise any upward waste light by the proper application of suitably directional luminaires and light controlling attachments.

2) Light Intrusion (into Windows) – These values are suggested maxima and need to take account of existing light intrusion at the point of measurement. In the case of road lighting on public highways where building facades are adjacent to the lit highway, these levels may not be obtainable. In such cases where a specific complaint has been received, the Highway Authority should endeavour to reduce the light intrusion into the window down to the post curfew value by fitting a shield, replacing the luminaire, or by varying the lighting level.

3) Luminaire Intensity – This applies to each luminaire in the potentially obtrusive direction, outside of the area being lit. The figures given are for general guidance only and for some sports lighting applications with limited mounting heights, may be difficult to achieve.

4) Building Luminance – This should be limited to avoid over lighting, and related to the general district brightness. In this reference building luminance is applicable to buildings directly illuminated as a night-time feature as against the illumination of a building caused by spill light from adjacent luminaires or luminaires fixed to the building but used to light an adjacent area.

Policy SE10 - Light Pollution

Development proposals that include the provision of new outdoor lighting should be designed to minimise light glare, light trespass, spillage and sky glow in order to preserve residential amenity, the character of the surroundings and prevent disturbance to wildlife.

A Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment will be required for proposed developments that fall in to the E1 category.

Proposals that exceed the Institute of Lighting Professionals standards will not be permitted.


[i]https://www.theilp.org.uk/documents/obtrusive-light/


 

17 - Communities

17.1 Social, cultural and community facilities are an integral part of developing inclusive and cohesive communities.

17.2 One of the core principles of the National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) is to take account of and support local strategies to support health, social and cultural wellbeing for all, and deliver sufficient community and cultural facilities to meet local needs.

17.3 The NPPF also states that planning policies and decisions should plan positively for the provision and use of shared space, community facilities and other local services, and to guard against the unnecessary loss of such facilities. It states that planning policy should promote the retention and development of local services and community facilities in villages

17.4 The NPPF affords protection to existing open space, sports and recreational buildings and land, including playing fields should not be built on unless the land is surplus to requirements, or the development will result in better provision of open space or sports and recreational provision.

17.5 Community facilities are defined in this plan as local and village shops, meeting places, sports venues, nurseries, cultural buildings, public houses, places of worship, public rights of way, other local services which enhance the sustainability of communities and residential environments and vacant land last lawfully used as a community facility or previously occupied by a building whose last lawful use was for a community facilities.

17.6 The provision of new facilities can be important in promoting sustainable development by reducing the need to travel and providing a service for those who do not have access to transport.

 

Policy CM01 – Provision of New Community Facilities

Proposals for new, or extensions or improvements to existing community facilities will be permitted provided they are:

1) Of a scale to meet the needs of the local community and in keeping with the character of the area;

2) Provided with adequate parking and operational space; and

3) Accessible by walking or cycling to the local community.

 

 

Protection of Existing Community Facilities

17.7 Community facilities including local shops, services and public houses play a vital economic and social role in both urban and rural areas and their retention can assist in meeting the needs of the local community and reducing the need to travel. The Council recognises that there is a risk that such facilities may be lost to more financially profitable uses, and that such facilities are often difficult to replace. It is therefore considered that the loss of existing facilities should be resisted where they provide for a current or future local need.

17.8 Such facilities that are important to the community should be retained unless genuine but unsuccessful attempts have been made to retain the premises in a community use. To assess applications for the change of use or redevelopment of existing community facilities, the Council will require a thorough analysis of the existing operation and attempts made to secure the future viability of the community use. In all cases, the applicant must demonstrate that:

The following policy seeks to ensure that existing community facilities are protected where there is a need for them.

Policy CM02 – Protection of Existing Community Facilities

Proposals which would result in the loss of a community facility as defined in this plan will not be permitted unless:

Proposals which would result in the loss of a community facility as defined in this plan will not be permitted unless:

1) it can be demonstrated that there is insufficient viable need for the community use or there is alternative local provision which is accessible to the local community, and

2) it is demonstrated that every reasonable attempt has been made to secure an alternative community use before non-community uses will be permitted.

 

New Primary School, Margate

17.9 Kent County Council, as education authority, has identified a need for a new primary school in Margate. Margate's urban area is extensively developed and opportunities to provide a suitable site are extremely limited.

17.10 Evidence identifies that a surplus of employment land was allocated in the 2006 Local Plan and this sets allocates employment sites considered necessary to meet the need for employment development. This does not include the All Saints site, making it available for the development of a new primary school.

17.11 Land is allocated at the All Saints Industrial Estate to accommodate a new primary school. The site is conveniently located in close proximity to Margate train station and is close to main bus routes. The Council will continue to work with Kent County Council in developing this proposal.

Map 21 - New Primary School, Margate

Policy CM03 – New Primary School, Margate

Land is allocated at the All Saints Avenue, Margate, as shown on Map 21, for the development of a new Primary School.

Margate Cemetery Expansion

17.12 Margate Cemetery is nearing capacity and a need has been identified for its expansion. A site of approximately 4.2 ha has been identified to the east of the existing cemetery to accommodate the additional land requirement.

 

Map 22 - Expansion of Margate Cemetery

Policy CM04 - Expansion of Margate Cemetery

Land is allocated and safeguarded for the expansion of Margate Cemetery and ancillary uses.

Extension of Minster Cemetery

17.13 Minster Cemetery is nearing capacity and a need has been identified for its expansion. The precise location of the extension to the existing Cemetery has yet to be established. On this basis no specific site is identified however the following policy seeks to address this issue.

Policy CM05 - Expansion of Minster Cemetery

Land should be provided for the expansion of Minster Cemetery and ancillary uses in reconciliation with the allocated housing site adjoining the existing Cemetery.

 


 

18 - Transport

Transport Assessments and Travel Plans

18.1 Development proposals may need to be accompanied by and judged against transport assessments or statements to assess the impact of development on the highway network and what improvements to transport infrastructure may be needed to accommodate them. Proposals likely to have significant transport implications will also require submission of a travel plan indicating measures to improve accessibility and promote sustainable and low carbon emission travel, such as electric vehicle charging infrastructure. Where feasible, development schemes should incorporate links to walking and cycling networks and/or contribute proportionately to their extension, rationalisation and improvement. Proposals should have regard to the route networks promoted in the walking and cycling strategies and integrate with them and with public transport routes and services. Many people will still choose to travel by car, and development may also need to provide or contribute to improvements to the road network to reduce congestion and improve pedestrian movement safety.

Policy TP01 - Transport assessments and Travel Plans

Development proposals which the Council considers would have significant transport implications shall be supported by a Transport Assessment and where applicable a Travel Plan. These should show how multi-modal access travel options will be achieved, and how transport infrastructure needs arising from the expected demand will be provided.

Walking

18.2 Walking and cycling generally improve overall health and fitness levels, can reduce the number of cars on the network, reducing congestion, improving air quality and saving money for the individual. Creating active street frontages, with more people walking and cycling, also reduces crime levels and can act as a catalyst for more people to become active. The quality, safety and convenience of access by foot, bicycle and public transport are all key factors in encouraging people to select alternative modes to the private car.

18.3 Thanet has a road network which largely accommodates footways on both sides, not only in the main towns and seaside settlements but also along the distributor routes connecting them. In the rural areas the Public Rights of Way network offers walkers (and sometimes horse riders and cyclists) a good connection across open countryside to the coast, rural settlements and end destinations, with some circular walks offering superb views of both coast and countryside combined. The Thanet Coastal Path follows the longest stretch of chalk coastline in the country, the route having been set up in the 1990s. The Viking Coastal Trail is good for beginner walkers, offering good views out to sea. There are other signposted walks in Thanet, including the Turner and Dickens Walk linking Margate and Broadstairs.

18.4 In 2005 “Feet First,” a local walking strategy for Thanet was published. This identifies barriers to walking in the district and aims to promote and enable walking, for example by specifying a network of routes for improvements.

 

Policy TP02 - Walking

New development will be expected to be designed so as to facilitate safe and convenient movement by pedestrians including people with limited mobility, elderly people and people with young children.

The Council will seek to approve proposals to provide and enhance safe and convenient walking routes including specifically connection to and between public transport stops, railway stations, town centres, residential areas, schools and other public buildings.

 

Cycling

18.5 Cycling can provide an alternative to the private car for short trips and form part of longer journeys by public transport. Popularity of cycling as a healthy, enjoyable, efficient, pollution-free and cheap means of transport is dependent on safe, continuous, direct and attractive cycleways, together with facilities for secure cycle storage at interchange points and destinations.

18.6 The Viking Coastal Trail roughly encircles the former island Isle of Thanet providing connections between the towns, leisure and heritage attractions. It forms part of the National Cycle Network and connects to the Oyster Bay Trail to Whitstable. Other routes have designated facilities to make cycling more attractive, such as the shared use footway/cycleways adjacent to New Haine Road. Provision of toucan crossings and facilities (such as cycle parking at stations shopping centres and other key locations) also help to improve the attractiveness popularity of cycling in the district.

18.7 The Council has published a Thanet Cycling Plan, (developed in association with local cycling groups), and, in conjunction with the County Council, will seek provision of a network of cycle routes using existing routes and where appropriate extensions to the primary route network. This includes part of the “Sustrans” national cycle network, which runs through Thanet, together with priority links between residential areas, places of work, schools, stations and town centres. The Council will seek every opportunity to introduce cycle routes in accordance with Thanet Cycling Plan

18.8 Thanet Cycling Plan aims to establish a comprehensive safe network of cycle routes catering for all journey purposes, and features existing and proposed routes. The Cycling Plan may be updated periodically to reflect the evolving network, and its proposed cycle routes are not therefore featured on the Policies Map.

18.9 New development generating travel demand will be expected to promote cycling by demonstrating that the access needs of cyclists have been taken into account, and through provision of cycle parking and changing facilities. (Secure parking facilities and changing/shower facilities will encourage use of cycling). Cycle parking provision will be judged against the standards set out in the cycle parking standards appendix.

 

Policy TP03 - Cycling

The Council will seek the provision at the earliest opportunity of a network of cycle routes. Development that would prejudice the safety of existing or implementation of proposed cycle routes will not be permitted.

New development will be expected to consider the need for the safety of cyclists and incorporate facilities for cyclists into the design of new and improved roads, junction improvements and traffic management proposals.

Substantial development generating travel demand will be expected to provide convenient cycle parking and changing facilities.

New residential development will be expected to provide secure facilities for the parking and storage of cycles.

Bus and rail

18.10 Public transport has a major part to play in the realisation of a sustainable lifestyle by reducing car usage and pollution. Thanet has the lowest level of car ownership in Kent, which means that public transport is vital for personal mobility. A good public transport network is therefore important so that both these issues are addressed.

18.11 The Council has no direct control over the provision of bus and rail services. However, in its planning and other functions the Council will support the continuation and improvement of an effective public transport service for both bus and rail. Developer contributions will be used to facilitate implementation of such improvements. In addition the Council will expect new developments to take into account the needs of public transport. This could include various measures such as designing in waiting areas or the provision of sign posting and bus shelters.

18.12 Thanet is served by seven railway stations and has direct services to London, Canterbury, Ashford and Dover. The Integrated Kent franchise is currently held by Southeastern but a new South Eastern franchise is due to begin in April 2014.

18.13 In December 2009 High Speed One services commenced from Ramsgate to London St. Pancras reducing rail journey times to 1 hour and 16 minutes. For purposes of comparison, the mainline journey time to London Victoria is around 2 hours and to London Charing Cross up to 2 hours and 30 minutes.

Map 23 - The High Speed One Network

© Crown copyright and database rights 2014 Ordnance Survey 100018261
 
 Description: aaa1

 

 

The High Speed One network

 

The three principal stations are Ramsgate, Broadstairs and Margate with routes in three directions:

Buses

18.14 Buses have an important role to play in providing a flexible alternative to the private car. This Local Plan supports development that will facilitate greater use of and improvement to bus services. New development will be expected to provide or contribute towards appropriate improvements.

18.15 In 2000 a Quality Bus Partnership (QBP) was formed between Stagecoach, Thanet District and Kent County Council with the aim of increasing local bus patronage. The formation of the Partnership has seen investment in roadside infrastructure and new vehicles as well as other initiatives to improve services, such as the high frequency LOOP and STAR services. However, there are still areas of congestion and inefficiencies on the highway network that prevent the bus services running as well as they might. The QBP will continue to work to remove these restrictions.

18.16 The introduction of the “Thanet LOOP” in October 2004 was an immediate success and the existing Margate and Ramsgate local services the “Thanet STARS” was upgraded as a result. Bus patronage has steadily increased year on year and continues to do so with more Thanet residents recognising the convenience of bus use for accessibility within Thanet. PLUSBUS tickets are available at all Thanet stations enabling passengers to combine their train and bus tickets for unlimited travel around the district.

18.17 Stagecoach also operates direct routes to Canterbury and Dover. In these towns passengers can join connecting services to the remainder of East Kent, including Folkestone, Faversham and Ashford.

 

Policy TP04 - Public Transport

Development proposals will be expected to take account of the need to facilitate use of public transport. The Council will seek to approve proposals consisting of or incorporating:

1) improvement of passenger and waiting facilities

2) measures to improve personal security

3) improved accessibility for people with mobility limitations

4) bus/rail interchange facilities

5) secure cycle storage

Coach parking

18.18 The tourist trade in Thanet depends to a large extent on coach business. Coach travel is to be encouraged as an acceptable alternative to car based visitor travel. Dedicated sites to park coaches are therefore required. Sites at Palm Bay, Dreamland and Vere Road in Broadstairs are currently used for such purposes. Replacement provision for coach parking, displaced by development at the Rendezvous, Margate is needed; a potential alternative site being within Barnes Avenue car park, Westbrook.

18.19 Ramsgate has no designated coach park, and Broadstairs has limited provision which may prove to be insufficient at peak times. The Council will seek appropriate solutions to accommodate demand on a temporary basis until such time as a specific site may be justified and identified.

Policy TP05 – Coach Parking

Land at Vere Road, Broadstairs and Palm Bay, Cliftonville, as identified on the maps below, will be retained for use as coach parking to serve the tourist trade.

 

Map 24 - Vere Road, Broadstairs

 

© Crown copyright and database rights 2014 Ordnance Survey 100018261
 
 Description: Coach Parking - Vere Road

Map 25 - Palm Bay, Cliftonville

© Crown copyright and database rights 2014 Ordnance Survey 100018261
 
 Description: Coach Parking - Palm Bay

 

Within Barnes Avenue Car Park Westbrook, as identified on the map below, land will be identified and safeguarded and retained for use as coach parking to serve the tourist trade.

Map 26- Barnes Avenue Car Park, Westbrook

© Crown copyright and database rights 2014 Ordnance Survey 100018261
 
 Description: Coach Parking - Barnes Car Park

The Council will consider the need to identify a site to accommodate demand for coach parking at Ramsgate.

 

Car parking

18.20 The availability of car parking is a major influence on choice of means of travel. This Plan recognises the need to maintain some car parking provision, for example to provide choice of travel to urban centres, while restricting provision in new development in order to optimise site development potential, and promote sustainable transport choice.

18.21 The Council will expect new development to make efficient use of sites and optimise site development potential. Accordingly it will encourage well designed schemes that correspondingly minimise the proportion of the site used to accommodate the appropriate level of car parking.

18.22 Dreamland Heritage Amusement Park and other prospective developments are expected to draw increasing numbers of visitors. It is anticipated that during peak periods demand for off-street car parking in Margate and potentially other coastal towns may exceed current capacity. The Council will proactively seek and encourage suitable opportunities and solutions to manage and accommodate demand for car parking.

Policy TP06 – Car Parking

Proposals for development will be expected to make satisfactory provision for the parking of vehicles.

Suitable levels of provision will be considered in relation to individual proposals taking account of the type of development, location, accessibility, availability of opportunities for public transport, likely accumulation of car parking, design considerations and having regard to the guidance referred to below:

1) In considering the level of parking provision in respect of proposals for residential development (use class C3), the Council will refer to the guidance provided in Kent Design Review: Interim Guidance Note 3 - Residential Parking.

2) In considering the level of parking provision in respect of proposals for other development, the Council will refer to the indicative guidance in the Appendix

Where the level of provision implied in the above guidance would be detrimental to the character of a conservation area or adversely affect the setting of a listed building or ancient monument then a reduced level of provision may be accepted.

Within the town centres of Margate, Ramsgate and Broadstairs (as defined on the maps below) new development proposals will not be required or expected to provide onsite car parking spaces. Where feasible such proposals should consider measures to encourage occupiers to make greater use of public transport.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Map 27 - Car Parking in Margate Town Centre

© Crown copyright and database rights 2014 Ordnance Survey 100018261
 
 Description: Town Centre Parking - Margate

 

Map 28 - Car Parking in Ramsgate Town CentreDescription: Town Centre Parking - Ramsgate

Map 29 - Car Parking in Broadstairs Town Centre

Description: Town Centre Parking - Broadstairs

Policy TP09 sets out additional policy provisions in respect of car parking at Westwood.

18.23 The attractiveness of town centres for business, shoppers, residents and tourists depends amongst other things on an adequate level of car parking and effective enforcement of traffic regulations to prevent illegal parking on the highway and on public footpaths. In town centres the objective is to reduce the dominance of the private car in favour of walking, cycling and public transport, and to maximise site development potential. Accordingly the approach is to make better use of parking facilities that already exist, rather than providing more, and to apply charging and enforcement policies designed to encourage use of town centre public car parks for short term parking, and to prevent displacement of parking pressures beyond the immediate town centre area.

18.24 In district centres including Birchington, and Northdown Road, non-car transport and optimum use of existing public and on street provision for short stay will be encouraged through appropriate charges and enforcement.

18.25 Outside the areas referred to above, the Council will monitor the situation, and consider appropriate measures and mechanisms to address any problems identified.

Policy TP07 - Town Centre Public Car Parks

In the town centres of Margate, Ramsgate and Broadstairs the existing level of off-street public car parking will be retained. Development resulting in the loss of space at such car parks will be refused unless:

1) the proposal includes satisfactory replacement provision as part of the development or on an alternative site considered appropriate and compatible with the operational requirements of the Council’s parking section, or

2) exceptional release would enable provision at an alternative location for which there is greater demand and which is compatible with the operational requirements of the Council’s parking section, or

3) evidence demonstrates that the car park is under used and/or loss of spaces would be compatible with the operational requirements of the Council’s parking section.

 

Freight and service delivery

18.26 Effective delivery of goods and services is essential to the health of Thanet’s town centres, local business and economic regeneration. Road freight traffic needs to be directed to routes fit for the purpose. The airport, Thanet’s business parks, industrial estates and the Port of Ramsgate are directly accessible through the primary road network. However, town centre roads are generally unsuited to accommodate large vehicles, and off-street servicing facilities are limited. Proposals for new development in town centres will therefore be expected to include adequate off-street servicing. Where feasible, off-street loading areas, enabling goods to be delivered to shops in smaller loads, will be encouraged in new developments.

 

Policy TP08 - Freight and service delivery

New development proposals will be expected to demonstrate adequate off street servicing.

 

Car parking at Westwood

18.27 Due to its historically ad hoc pattern of growth, Westwood has a number of large, free car parks whose locations encourage shoppers to drive between them to visit its various retail stores. As a multi-purpose destination, Westwood is collectively over-provided with car parking. The Council will seek to encourage non-car travel to Westwood. Within the area shown on the map below, it will restrict parking provision, and encourage developers to work with the Council to reduce existing parking provision, develop better access, services and facilities for customers who wish to walk, cycle or arrive by public transport. The Council will seek to achieve this through cooperation with developers and in determining development applications to extend existing or build new commercial development.

18.28 A key objective of the Westwood Relief Scheme is to remove private vehicles from the area around the A256/A254 intersection in favour of a pedestrian friendly public realm enabling safe and convenient movement on foot between various commercial destinations and a smoother flow of through traffic passing around the area. Delivery of the scheme will require some reconfiguration of the road network and land use in the vicinity including potentially locating and rationalising car parking so that access by vehicle is from outside the pedestrian friendly area.

Policy TP09 - Car parking provision at Westwood

At Westwood, new commercial development proposals will be expected to demonstrate specific measures to encourage at least 20% of customers to arrive at the site by means other than car. Such measures will include restricting total levels of car parking provision as follows and will be the subject of a legal agreement.

1) Car parking provision in new development exceeding 90% of the indicative maximum level set out in the guidance at Appendix will require specific justification.

2) Where new development is proposed at sites with existing car parking then shared use of car parking will be expected and total provision, assessed on the basis of resultant total floor space of existing and new development, shall not exceed the maximum levels of provision referred in Clause 1.

Where extensions to premises are proposed then no new car parking provision will be permitted. Replacement of any car parking lost as a result of such development will not be permitted unless special justification can be demonstrated.

Proposals for development that may impact upon demand for car parking will be considered in light of compatibility with the Westwood Relief Scheme.

 

Map 30 - Car Parking at Westwood

© Crown copyright and database rights 2014 Ordnance Survey 100018261
 
 Description: Westwood parking area Oct 2014

 

 

 

Traffic Management

18.29 The emerging Transport Strategy identifies a range of issues to be addressed, and which may require traffic management based solutions. Such issues include the need to address deficiencies in the highway network or junction capacity affecting efficient running of bus services, causing congestion or affecting air quality and the need to improve connectivity and address barriers to walking and cycling.

 

Policy TP10- Traffic Management

Development required to implement traffic management measures designed to realise the best use of the highway network in terms of safety, traffic capacity and environmental conditions will be approved.



APPENDIX A:  ECONOMY

Strategic Employment Sites


Manston Business Park

Description: Manston

 

Eurokent

Description: Eurokent

 


 

Thanet Reach Business Park

Description: Thanet Reach

 

Hedgend industrial Estate

Description: Hedgend


Retained Employment Sites



Cromptons Site, Poorhole Lane

Description: Cromptons Site, Poorhole Lane

Dane Valley and Northdown Industrial Estates

Description: Dane Valley and Northdown with labels


 

Eurokent

 

Fullers Yard, Victoria Road

Description: Fullers Yard, Victoria Road

 

Haine Road Industrial Estate

Description: Haine Road Industrial Estate

 

Hedgend Industrial Estate

Description: Hedge End by Thanet Way

 

Laundry Road Industrial Estate

Description: Laundry Road Industrial Estate

 

Manston Business Park

Description: Manston Business Park with labels

 

Manston Green Industrial Estate

Description: Manston Green Industrial Estate

 

Manston Road Industrial Estate

Description: Manston Road Industrial Est

Pysons Road Industrial Estate

Description: Pysons Road Industrial Estate

 

St Lawrence Industrial Estate

Description: St Lawrence Industrial Estate

 

Thanet Reach Business Park

Description: Thanet Reach

Tivoli Road Industrial Estate

© Crown copyright and database rights 2014 Ordnance Survey 100018261Description: Tivoli Road Industrial Estate

 

Westwood Industrial Estate

Description: Westwood Industrial Estate

Whitehall Road Industrial, Princes Road Depot and Pioneer Business Park

Description: Whitehall and Princes Rd with labels

 

Manston Road Depot, Margate


 

Major Holiday, Intermediate and Undeveloped Beaches


APPENDIX B: HOUSING

HOUSING SITE ALLOCATIONS

SITE ADDRESS

NOTIONAL DWELLING CAPACITY

NOTIONAL DELIVERY PERIOD

SITE REFERENCE/S

..

 

now-2016

2016-21

2021-26

2026-31

Post 2031

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STRATEGIC SITES

Westwood

1450

300

550

600

S511, S553, S447

Birchington

1000

250

350

400

S515, S498, S499,

Westgate

1000

250

350

400

ST1, ST2

Manston Green

700

200

300

200

SS33

SUB TOTAL

4150

0

1000

1550

1600

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NON STRATEGIC SITES OUTSIDE URBAN AREA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

South of canterbury Rd, Ramsgate

27

 

 

27

 

 

S415

Land fronting Park lane, Birchington

90

 

90

 

 

 

ST3

Land south east of Brooke Avenue, Westbrook

34

 

34

 

 

 

S505

 Land at Haine Rd & Spratling St, Ramsgate

85

 

 

73

12

 

SR60

Land off Nash/Manston Rds, Margate

250